2012 Veterinary Medicine Achievements

* Dan Thomson, Jones professor of production medicine, was one of six professors nationwide to win a 2012 Excellence in College and University Teaching in the Food and Agricultural Sciences Regional Teaching Award. Thomson received the award from the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities. The award recognizes outstanding faculty members for their abilities as classroom teachers, use of innovative teaching methods, scholarship and service to students and their profession. Kansas State is first in the nation in the number of the teaching awards received, with a combined total of 13 national and regional awards. December 2012

* An international scientific collaboration that included two Kansas State University researchers was part of a successful project that mapped the genome of the domestic pig. The sequenced genome gives researchers a genetic blueprint of the pig. Once all of the genetic information is understood, scientists anticipate improvements to the animal's health as well as human health, as pigs and humans share similar physiologies. Taking part in the project were Yongming Sang, research assistant professor of anatomy and physiology, and Frank Blecha, associate dean at the College of Veterinary Medicine and university distinguished professor of anatomy and physiology. November 2012

* The Association of Avian Veterinarians and Lafeber Company recently named Jim Carpenter, professor and service chief of exotic, wildlife and zoo animal medicine at the College of Veterinary Medicine, as the T.J. Lafeber Avian Practitioner of the Year. August 2012

* Three veterinary medicine students took the top honors in the 2012 Smithcors essay contest, sponsored by the American Veterinary Medical History Society. The contest is open to all veterinary students in the U.S. Canada and the West Indies. It promotes awareness among veterinarians about the significant history the field has played in American history. May 2012

* Raymond "Bob" Rowland, professor of diagnostic medicine and pathobiology, and collaborating researchers recently discovered a genetic marker that identifies pigs with reduced susceptibility to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome, or PRRS. The research appeared in the Journal of Animal Science. March 2012

 

2011 Veterinary medicine

2010 Veterinary medicine

2009 Veterinary medicine

College of Veterinary Medicine