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K-State in the news today

Read some of today's top stories mentioning Kansas State University. Download an Excel file (xls) with all of the day's news stories. 

See more K-State faculty, staff and students in the news in the clip archives.

Monday, March 4, 2024

National/International

Realizing Potential: Libraries employ (and investigate) artificial intelligence
3/1/2024 American Libraries Magazine
In 2021, the Sunderland Foundation Innovation Lab (SFIL) at Kansas State University in Manhattan opened its AI Studio. The studio, located inside Hale Library—the main library on campus—provides access to technologies and programming to students and faculty across disciplines and members of the public. "People are very interested in what AI is doing for them," says Jeff Sheldon, SFIL's associate director. "With that comes exploration of things like ethics and how to apply [them]."

Babies born March 2 can get a free book for Dr. Seuss Day
3/1/2024 USA TODAY
As for "The Cat in the Hat," "the cat is somewhere in between offensive and inoffensive," Philip Nel, Kansas State University professor of English and author of "Was the Cat in the Hat Black?: The Hidden Racism of Children's Literature and the Need for Diverse Books," previously told USA TODAY. Nel said that telling aspects of the cat clearly are derived from racist blackface performers popular a century ago – performers, who, like the cat, often wore white gloves and neckwear.

Realizing potential: Libraries employ (and investigate) artificial intelligence
3/1/24 American Libraries Magazine
In 2021, the Sunderland Foundation Innovation Lab (SFIL) at Kansas State University in Manhattan opened its AI Studio. The studio, located inside Hale Library, provides access to technologies and programming to students and faculty across disciplines and members of the public. “People are very interested in what AI is doing for them,” says Jeff Sheldon, SFIL’s associate director. “With that comes exploration of things like ethics and how to apply [them].”

How to Keep Snakes Out of Your Yard — Easy Expert Tips Stop Them From Slithering
3/2/2024 Yahoo!Life and For Women First
"Tall grass is always snake habitat," says Drew Ricketts, associate professor and extension wildlife specialist for Kansas State University Research and Extension. That's because tall grasses help snakes hide from their natural predators, birds like hawks and owls. Since snakes are also generally shy animals and prefer being left alone, taller grasses give them ample hiding places. So neglecting to mow your yard can be a problem.

State/Regional

K-State president speaks at Cattlemen's Day
3/1/2024 High Plains Journal
Cattle producers heard about plans at Kansas State University from its top cat on March 1 in Manhattan, Kansas. President Richard Linton opened the 111th K-State Cattlemen's Day and talked about the university's strategy for the future.

Local

State wheat experts to outline best practices for growing wheat in Kansas
3/3/2024 JC Post
K-State Research and Extension and Kansas Wheat are hosting a pair of meetings in Dodge City (March 7) and Wichita (March 8) to share what those organizations term "a prescription for producing high-yielding and high-quality wheat in a sustainable manner." The meetings – called Kansas Wheat Rx – combine suggested management practices for the economical and sustainable production of high-quality winter wheat in Kansas. The information is based on research conducted at Kansas State University and funded – at least in part – by Kansas Wheat, a cooperative agreement between the Kansas Wheat Commission and the Kansas Association of Wheat Growers.

Severe weather looms; make plans now to stay safe, says K-State meteorologist
3/2/2024 The Mercury
Kansas State University meteorologist Chip Redmond agrees that weather in Kansas can change pretty quickly, so it's important to know what to do in any situation in order to remain safe. "It starts with preparedness," said Redmond, who is also manager of the Kansas Mesonet. "We all should have a plan, including such things as just knowing how you get your weather alerts. You may get those from a weather radio or other sources, such as news media. And then, you need to talk with your family."

 

*Note: Asterisks indicate clips that resulted from recent news releases or pitches from Communications and Marketing.