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K-State in the news today

Read some of today's top stories mentioning Kansas State University. Download an Excel file (xls) with all of the day's news stories. 

See more K-State faculty, staff and students in the news in the clip archives

Thursday, March 21, 2019

National

American farmers confront a mental health crisis
3/20/19 San Francisco Gate
"The peak of the crisis was in 1986," said Allen Featherstone, an agricultural economist at Kansas State University in Manhattan. "It is the worst since then by far."

For these intrepid crickets, Hawaii’s lava is home sweet home
3/20/19 Science
These conditions might even contribute to a rather rare evolutionary scenario, says Jeremy Marshall, a cricket researcher at Kansas State University in Manhattan. "Usually when we think about who is choosy, it's females of a species," he says. "But if mating is going to be even more costly for males, we might get a situation in which … we'd expect to see the opposite, for males to become the choosy ones driving sexual selection."

State

Kansas House Approves Medicaid Expansion, But The Fight Isn't Over Yet
3/20/19 KCUR
Neither the state nor the KHI estimate include a projection of how much economic activity triggered by an infusion of nearly $1 billion in additional federal Medicaid funding would increase state revenues. New research done by economists at Kansas State University indicates the spike in revenue would be nearly enough to cover the state’s share of expansion costs.

Floods, tornado outbreaks, more signs of change
3/20/19 The Marysville Advocate
Several years ago, a few scientists from Kansas State University and the University of Kansas joined researchers from around the world on a panel that earned the Nobel Peace Prize for its work to lay out what climate change is doing to our planet. Their work showed greater extremities in weather events. For this part of Kansas it meant harsher rainfall, more frequent flooding along with warmer, wetter nights and all their side effects. 

 *Note: Asterisks indicate clips that resulted from recent news releases or pitches from Communications and Marketing.