K-State Perspectives flag
Home

 

The Konza Prairie Biological Station

History

Future

 

Konza research

Burning, grazing

Evolutionary view

Fires important

Fires maintain prairie

Fungi necessary

Herbarium helpful

Small streams

Soil research

Water quality

 

Life on the Konza

Fisheries

Small mammals

Mammals

Researchers at Konza

Songbirds

Butterflies on Konza

 

Educational value

LTER program

Take a tour

 

Archives

Staff

 

Links

News Services

Konza Prairie Biological Station

Send an electronic postcard featuring Konza

 

Come see the prairie

Konza Prairie Biological Station hiking trails, visitor days

By April M. Blackmon

 

 

trail view
Photo by April M. Blackmon.

The Konza Prairie offers several miles of hiking trails for everyone.

 

 

Konza Prairie is located at the east end of the Kansas River Bridge in Manhattan, Kansas. The entrance is accessible from K-177 by following McDowell Creek Road for six miles or from Interstate 70 by taking exit 307 and going northeast on McDowell Creek Road for four miles.

Three-mile Nature Trail

This trail winds through bottom lands, crosses Kings Creek, Dewey Ranch old brome fields, climbs over ancient limestone ledges until it reaches the tallgrass prairie and at the highest point gives a spectacular view of Konza Prairie and the Kansas River Valley.

Just off this trail is the Hokanson Homestead settled by Swedish immigrants in 1878. Allow 2.5 hours to enjoy this hike of just less than 3 miles. A reservation can be made by calling the Environmental Educator at 785-587-0381 for a guided tour.

Be aware that parts of this trail are fairly strenuous and individuals with physical disabilities may have difficulty.

School groups may make special arrangements to visit other parts of the Konza Prairie Biological Station. For more information, visit the Konza Environmental Education Program.

Biennial Visitors Day

In addition to miles of hiking trails, the Konza Prairie Biological Station holds a biennial fall Visitors Day (on even-numbered years).

Van and bus tours provide an opportunity to view research areas and bison herds; and guided hikes are conducted throughout the day. Hike lengths vary from one-half mile to five miles.

In addition, video and slide presentations, as well as displays and exhibits, provide nformation about prairie life and history, current research and the effects of fire and grazing. Merchandise is also available to purchase.

For more information, call 785-587-0441 or check Konza's calendar for upcoming Visitor Days.

June 2002