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News Services
Kansas State University
128 Dole Hall
Manhattan, KS 66506
785-532-2535
media@k-state.edu
Information provided by K-State News Services may be reproduced without permission. The marks and names of Kansas State University are protected trademarks and may not be used in any commercial or private endeavor without the approval of the university.

Huck Boyd National Institute for Rural Development

Director: Ron Wilson
Address: 101 Umberger Hall
Phone number: 785-532-7690
Website: http://www.huckboyd.ksu.edu/

 

The Huck Boyd National Institute for Rural Development was created Dec. 15, 1989, and its doors opened on the K-State campus April 2, 1990. The institute is funded by the State of Kansas through K-State, with additional support from the Huck Boyd Foundation. It is a unique combination of a public-private partnership between the State of Kansas and the Huck Boyd Foundation.

The Huck Boyd National Institute for Rural Development enhances rural development by helping rural people help themselves. The institute strengthens the roles of the private sector, entrepreneurship and local leadership in rural development, encourages cooperation among rural development providers, identifies emerging rural policy needs and communicates needed strategies for the future through outreach to rural communities. In addition, the institute promotes the important benefits of agriculture and rural life and utilizes strategic alliances and partnerships in accomplishing their mission.

The Huck Boyd Institute provides mini-grants to counties for the development and implementation of new educational, adult leadership programs. In addition, the institute's report, County Cooperation, describes voluntary, multi-community cooperative efforts in 16 rural Kansas locations. To encourage entrepreneurship, the institute has compiled and broadcasted more than 200 profiles of entrepreneurs, community leaders and others who have created hundreds of jobs in more than 89 counties in Kansas.