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Biochemistry student from Leawood recognized with Women in STEMM award

Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2015

Eaton

Muriel Eaton, junior in biochemistry, Leawood, conducts research on the assembly of the proteasome, a protein that helps break down damages and excessive proteins in cells. | Download this photo.
 


MANHATTAN — A Kansas State University biochemistry student has been recognized for her contributions to the science field and her chemistry magic shows for the community.

Muriel Eaton, junior in biochemistry, Leawood, is the recipient of the 2015 Women in STEMM student achiever award.

Women in STEMM, sponsored by Central Exchange, held its second awards gala on Sept. 24 to honor six Kansas City women who are involved in a STEMM — science, technology, engineering, math or medicine —field.

"When I found out I received the student achiever award, I realized that not only am I a contributing member of the scientific community, but also of the real world," Eaton said. "I want to use my skills to help change the world for the better."

Recipients of the award must have demonstrated academic achievements, professional aspirations related to STEMM and community involvement.

As a member of Alpha Chi Sigma, Beta Rho chapter, Eaton promotes the science industry through chemistry magic shows for the community. She also is a member of Company G-7, the university’s chapter of the National Society of Pershing Rifles, which encourages citizenship and showing patriotism during community events.

"Muriel shows an amazing ability to excel at her coursework while at the same time conducting research and engaging in extracurricular activities," said Alina De La Mota-Peynado, assistant professor of biology.

Eaton was inspired by science at a very young age.

"In elementary school I conducted my first experiment of making a dull penny shiny again, and it was then that I knew I would always be on the side of science," Eaton said. "Since then, teaching hands-on science to kids for my Gold Award project and caring for my grandmother who has nominal aphasia, my love for science has only grown."

Currently, Eaton is conducting research on the proteasome, a protein that helps break down damages and excessive proteins in cells. Proteasomes are the target of many cancer treatments, and research needs to be conducted on the assembly and function, Eaton said.

Eaton is a student in the College of Arts & Sciences and plans to receive her doctorate in molecular biophysics, or medicinal chemistry and molecular pharmacology. Her future aspirations include conducting research on how to minimize the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

Source

Muriel Eaton
meaton02@k-state.edu

Website

Central Exchange WiSTEMM

News tip

Leawood

Written by

Taylor Manges
785-532-1543
taylorhm@k-state.edu

At a glance

Muriel Eaton, junior in biochemistry, is the recipient of the 2015 Women in STEMM student achiever award.