September 18, 2012



K-State Community Cultural Harmony Week

By scott jones

Founded by Barbara Baker in 1988, Community Cultural Harmony Week is a cooperative effort of Kansas State University, the K-State Union, Union Program Council, School of Leadership Studies, K-State Libraries, office of student life, USD 383 and the city of Manhattan.

Contact the office of atudent lfe, 102 Holton Hall, stulife@k-state.edu, 785-532-6432 for more information. Events include:

Tuesday, Sept. 18 

  • Understanding Rape: A Conversation," 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Room 213, K-State Union 213, presented by Mary Todd, director of the K-State Women's Center. Experiences of sexual assault affect many women, men, and children in our communities. If you are approached for help by someone who has been affected by this type of trauma, you can provide great comfort by having appropriate resource and referral information at hand. This Safe Zone training module will also focus on listening skills and sharing a perspective on the healing process from the crime victim's view. Visit www.ksu.edu/safezone or call 532-6444 to register.
  • “Centered: 40 Years of Expanding Multiculturalism at K-State Libraries," 4 p.m. Hale Library fourth Floor. A celebration honoring the past and looking to the future of the multicultural center first established in 1972. Exhibits, remarks and refreshments will accompany the unveiling of the center's new home. Sponsored by the K-State Libraries & the Dow Corporation; contact Melia Erin Fritch at 532-7361 or visit www.lib.ksu.edu/dowmrc.

Wednesday, Sept. 19

  • “Community Journalism and Other Stuff in a Changing World," 10:30 a.m., Forum Hall, Union, presented by David Dary, author, historian, educator and broadcast journalist. Sponsored by the Huck Boyd Lecture in Community Media in the A.Q. School of Journalism and Mass Communications and by the K-State Libraries.
  • “The Dary Trails: The Library and Papers of David Dary," 3:30 p.m., Hale Library Morse Department of Special Collections Gallery, fifth floor, Hale Library. Sponsored by the Huck Boyd Lecture in Community Media in the A.Q. School of Journalism and Mass Communications and by the K-State Libraries.
  • “Two Spirits” film, 6 p.m. Beach Museum of Art, followed by a discussion led by Lisa Tatonetti. The film interweaves the tragic story of a mother’s loss of her son with a revealing look at the largely unknown history of a time when the world wasn’t simply divided into male and female, and many Native American cultures held places of honor for people of integrated genders. Powerful and moving, Lydia Nibley’s “Two Spirits” explores the life and death of Fred Martinez and the ancient Native American two-spirit tradition. Fred became one of the youngest hate-crime victims in modern history when he was brutally murdered at 16. Between tradition and controversy, freedom and fear, is the truth — the bravest choice you can make is to be yourself. Sponsored by the KSU LGBTQ Resource Center. Visit facebook.com/KState/LGBTQ for more information.
  • Affirmative Action at the Crossroads: The Uncertain Future of Race-Conscious College Admissions," 7 p.m., K-State Alumni Center Ballroom, presented by Steven Ramirez, professor of law at Loyola University of Chicago. Ramirez will analyze an important case set for oral arguments in the U. S. Supreme Court this fall: Fisher v. the University of Texas at Austin. The lawsuit challenges a race –conscious admissions policy at the University of Texas and may lead to the court reconsidering and altering affirmative action policies it had previously ruled constitutional in 2003. This presentation is in observance of Constitution Day and sponsored by the Dorothy L. Thompson Civil Rights Lecture Series of Kansas State University.

Thursday, Sept. 20

  • Banned books readings & screening of “Precious Knowledge," movie trailer, noon, Bosco Plaza. “Precious Knowledge” is a documentary that details the struggles of the students involved in the Ethnic Studies ban in Arizona. Sponsored by K-State Alianza.
  • “A Conversation with the Lacks Family," 7 p.m., Union Grand Ballroom. Join the son and great-granddaughter of Henrietta Lacks to learn about the complex life of Henrietta and her cells. “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks” is a true story of Henrietta, a poor black tobacco farmer whose cells – known as HeLa to the many scientists who use them – were taken without her knowledge and used to help develop some of the most important advances in medicine, including the polio vaccine, cloning, gene mapping, in vitro fertilization, and more.  Lacks was never recognized or compensated for the use of her cells. Sponsored by SGA Diversity Programming and the K-State Book Network. Visit www.k-state.edu/ksbn for more information.

Friday, Sept. 20

  • Community Cultural Harmony Week Awards and Luncheon, noon-1:30 p.m, Union Cottonwood Room. Presentation of the Peace Awards and Joey Lee Garmin Scholarship. Those wishing to dine may purchase lunch through the K-State Union Bluemont Buffet and bring their plate to the Cottonwood Room where glasses and tableware will be provided. Attendees who are NOT dining go directly to the Cottonwood Room.
  • “Precious Knowledge” film, 4 p.m. 13 Leasure Hall. “Precious Knowledge” is a documentary that details the struggles of the students involved in the Ethnic Studies ban in Arizona. Sponsored by K-State Alianza.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Founded by Barbara Baker in 1988, Community Cultural Harmony Week is a cooperative effort of Kansas State University, the K-State Union, Union Program Council, Leadership Studies, K-State Libraries, Office of Student Life, USD 383, and the City of Manhattan.

 

Contact the Office of Student Life, 102 Holton Hall, stulife@ksu.edu, (785) 532-6432 for more information.