Michel Lab

Mailing Address
Kansas State University
Division of Biology
267 Chalmers Hall
Manhattan, KS 66506
USA

Phone
office +1-785-532-0161
lab +1-785-532-0183
insectary +1-785-532-5837

Fax
+1-785-532-6653

email

Photograph of lab members at Konza prairee

Lab members

Kristin Michel

Kristin Michel
Associate Professor

I obtained a Diplom in Biology (M.Sc. equiv.) at the Christian-Albrechts-University in Kiel, Germany, and a Ph.D. in Entomology at the University of California Riverside.  I did my Ph.D. training with Dr. Peter Atkinson working on insect transformation systems,  and subsequently worked on mosquito immunity in Dr. Fotis C. Kafatos' laboratory at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory and Imperial College London. I joined the faculty in the Division of Biology at K-State in 2007.

Phone: 785-532-0161
email: kmichel@ksu.edu
  

Research Associates

Bart Bryant

Bart Bryant
I received my Ph.D. in Biology at Kansas State University in 2008 and subsequently trained in Dr. Alex Raikhel's laboratory at the University of California Riverside. I joined the Michel Laboratory in January of 2011.

My research focuses on the analysis of hemocytes and the signal transduction pathways that lead to their proliferation and differentiation.

Phone: 785-532-0183
email: wbb@ksu.edu

Photograph of Dave Meekins

Dave Meekins
I received my Ph.D. in Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry at the University of Kentucky in 2014 studying the structural dynamics of glucan phospatases in Dr. Matthew Gentry's lab. I joined the Michel Laboratory in July of 2014.

My research focuses on the structure-function analysis of serpins and identification of their protease targets.

Phone: 785-532-0183
email: dmeekins@ksu.edu

Xin Zhang

Xin Zhang
I received my Ph.D. in Entomology at Kansas State University in December of 2010 and subsequently joined the Michel Laboratory.

My research focuses on the analysis of extracellular protease cascades that regulate melanization in mosquitoes. My work uses a combination of biochemical and reverse genetic tools to determine how serpins regulate melanization pathways.

Phone: 785-532-0183
email: xz65@ksu.edu

Graduate Students

Victoria Davidson

Tori Davidson
I received my bachelor's degree in Microbiology from Kansas State University in 2012.  After a rotation in the Michel Laboratory in the Fall of 2012, I joined the lab this year to pursue my doctorate degree.

My research focuses on the analysis of extracellular protease cascades that regulate the innate immune system in mosquitoes. For these investigations, I am establishing novel fungal and bacterial challenge models in mosquitoes.

Phone: 785-532-0161
email: victorea@k-state.edu

 Mary (MK) Mills

 MK (Mary) Mills
I graduated with a B.A. in Biology with minors in Chemistry and Spanish from Georgia Southern University in 2012 and joined the Michel lab in Fall 2012. My research focuses on reverse genetic analyses of the biting midge Culicoides sonorensis.

Phone: 785-532-0161
email: mm02463@ksu.edu

Undergraduate Students

 Jessica McKeown

 Jessica McKeown
I am a Junior in Biology and the Premedical Program at Kansas State University.  I joined the Michel lab in the Spring of 2014.

Together with Konner, I currently maintain the Anopheles gambiae mosquito colonies in the insectary and contribute to general lab maintenance. 

 Phone: 785-532-0161
email:
jmckeown@k-state.edu

Erin Peel

Erin Peel
I am a Junior at Kansas State University.  My major of study is microbiology.  I joined the Michel lab in the Spring of 2013 with an undergraduate research scholarship.

My research project aims to determine the extracellular protease network upstream that regulates melanization in mosquitoes. This work is supported by a K-INBRE student scholarship.

 Phone: 785-532-0161
email: peel@ksu.edu


 Konner Winkley

  Konner Winkley
I am a Freshman in Biology and the Premedical Program at Kansas State University. In addition, I am getting a minor in Business. I joined the Michel lab in the Fall of 2013.

Together with Jessica, I currently maintain the Anopheles gambiae mosquito colonies in the insectary and contribute to general lab maintenance. In addition, I explore the functions of signaling pathways on fungal and bacterial infections in mosquitoes. This research was funded initially by an A&S undergraduate research award, and is now supported by a K-INBRE student scholarship.

 Phone: 785-532-0161
email: kmwinkley@k-state.edu