Skip to the content

Kansas State University

[an error occurred while processing this directive]
Print This Article  

NEW FINDINGS HAVE FORMED BASIS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF RABIES VIRUS VACCINES, ACCORDING TO RESEARCHER PRESENTING AT INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM AT K-STATE

 

By Erinn Barcomb-Peterson

 

New findings about innate and adaptive immune responses have formed the basis for the development of new rabies virus vaccines, according to researcher Bernhard Dietzschold.

He spoke about Borna disease and the rabies virus Nov. 14 at an international symposium at Kansas State University. The Emerging Infections Symposium: A Tribute to the One Medicine, One Health Concept drew nearly 150 researchers from across North America, Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

Dietzschold, from Thomas Jefferson University, said these new rabies virus vaccines have pre- and post-exposure efficacies that are superior to conventional vaccines.

K-State's own rabies lab, part of the K-State College of Veterinary Medicine, performs a variety of services including serologic testing of humans, serologic testing of animals for export to rabies-fee countries, diagnostic testing of Kansas and Nebraska animals, maintenance of numerous related databases, and regional variant typing on samples from throughout the Great Plains. More information about the lab is available at:
http://www.vet.ksu.edu/depts/dmp/service/rabies/index.htm

The Emerging Infections Symposium's major sponsors included the Kansas Bioscience Authority and the Heartland BioAgro Consortium, which is leading an effort to bring a federal institute for animal health to Kansas. K-State is one of the finalists for relocation of the National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility.