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K-STATERS ACROSS THE STATE

Wildcats helping Kansans

Every day, K-Staters are working to make life better for all Kansans. Here's a look at some of those efforts during the past few months.

 

K-STATE DRAMA PROFESSORS CREATE CURRICULUM TO HELP KANSAS TEACHERS USE 'ROMEO AND JULIET' TO TALK WITH STUDENTS ABOUT VIOLENCE: Sally D. Bailey and R. Michael Gros got a grant from K-State's Center for Engagement and Community Development to develop a curriculum that can help teachers use "Romeo and Juliet" to get students talking about teen and family violence and the alternatives. Read more.

 

 

 

 

Agriculture
Community
Economy
Education
Environment
Health
Social and family issues
Transportation
Directory -- K-State people and places helping Kansans
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Agriculture

 

K-State sociologist finds many aging Kansas farmers don't plan to retire and lack strategies to keep family farms going in the future; rural culture at stake
Farming is less a job than it is a way of life for the Kansas farmers who watch their peers retire from office and factory jobs without intentions of quitting themselves. They also often don't have plans for the farms after they're gone.

 

 

 

 

 

radial nodesK-State engineers use computer models to examine how epidemics could spread in rural Kansas
With funding from the National Science Foundation, researchers are using academic models to study the spread of diseases in rural areas. Their goal is to identify optimal strategies to forecast and control disease outbreaks in rural areas. What are used as mitigation strategies in cities will not be so effective in rural areas, they say.

 

 

 

 

 

Jana Sorensen portraitUndergraduate researcher helps educate Kansas agricultural workers about hearing loss
Public education projects were typical during Sorensen's youth when she was a member of 4-H. She wanted to create another such project at K-State about hearing conservation and the importance of agricultural workers wearing hearing protection.

 

 

 

 

 

Cow and calfBovine viral diarrhea Web site available to assist Kansas cattle producers
A new Web site with information about Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus is now available with information regarding the disease, its diagnosis, prevention and control methods. The new site can be found at http://www.bvdinfo.org.

 

 

 

 

 

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Community

 

 

farmhouse in fieldK-State researchers making it easier for rural Kansans to stay in shape
In many Kansas communities, you have to have a car to be anywhere other than among grass and trees. It's a challenge among so-called frontier states: What looks like open space often is privately owned, used for agriculture and otherwise not suitable for recreation. Local parks often are not big enough for walking trails or skating facilities, while local streets may not be suitable for cyclists or pedestrians.

 

 

 

 

 

Native American on poster for sesquicentennialStudents help Wabaunsee County celebrate its history
Four Chapman Center interns created a permanent exhibit on early African-American settlers in Wabaunsee County. The exhibit was on display at the Wabaunsee County Courthouse in Alma for the sesquicentennial celebration, and then was turned over to the county's Museum and Historical Society.

 

 

 

 

 

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Economy

 

 

business logoKansas piano tuner benefits from expertise at K-State's Advanced Manufacturing Institute
The Advanced Manufacturing Institute at K-State has assisted HG Engineering, McPherson, with the launch of Flextrusion, a tooling system that increases process control in plastic extruders for the tubing and profile industries.

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Charles FaulkKansas piano tuner benefits from expertise at K-State's Advanced Manufacturing Institute
Charles Faulk, a pianist, piano technician and professional wood turner with more than 30 years experience in piano manufacturing, restoration and concert-level piano work, received assistance from the Advanced Manufacturing Institute in the development of his piano tuning hammers for his business, Faulk Piano Service.

 

 

 

 

hand reaching for appleK-State helps communities network to keep groceries local
Many community groceries are foundering as rural populations age and decline. And several community-focused organizations, including K-State's Center for Engagement and Community Development are working together to provide resources and support for rural groceries.

 

 

 

 

 

K-State's Advanced Manufacturing Institute provides Kansas company a competitive advantage
Kansas State University's Advanced Manufacturing Institute has assisted a Kansas company with the development of a new machine that helps reduce its costs and improve its product. The company, which has a production facility in Council Grove, received assistance from K-State's Advanced Manufacturing Institute in the development of its new wire bender.

 

 

woman typing on computerK-State's offers free job search to alumni
Kansas State University's Alumni Association and Career and Employment Services are launching a free service during the economic downturn to help members and all graduates of the university locate jobs that require advanced work experience.

 

 

 

 

 

Where's my job?In economically hard times, career and employment services at K-State helps out
Finding a job can be challenging in today's economy, so Kansas State University's career and employment services has launched a new Web site with advice tailored to job seekers from each of K-State's colleges.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Education

 

 

bridges programGrant of $1.1 million to continue K-State's Kansas Bridges program
Kansas State University has been awarded $1.1 million to renew its successful Kansas Bridges to the Bachelor's program. Because of the program's success, the National Institutes of Health has extended funding for five years.

 

 

 

 

 

scene from Romeo and JulietCamp Shakespeare teaches Kansas high school teachers new ways to reach students with the bard's work
K-State professor of English, and Charlotte MacFarland, K-State associate professor of drama, joined two teachers from Manhattan High School to lead Camp Shakespeare. The weeklong course brought 10 teachers from across the state to campus, where they learned how to better teach the bard's work to Kansas teens.

 

 

 

 

 

 

girl in classroom at deskK-State, Geary County schools collaborate to improve K-12 science education
The National Science Foundation awarded K-State a $2.7 million grant for five years to establish a K-State-based project of the foundation's Graduate Science Fellows in Kindergarten through 12th Grade Education program. The K-State project will work to improve the communication and collaboration skills of young scientists while enriching science content in the classroom.

 

 

 

 

 

Olathe schools logoK-State opening up world of research, animal health industry to Olathe students
The Olathe district and K-State are collaborating to offer a special, hands-on animal sciences program to Olathe high school students, beginning in fall 2009. The program -- the newest in the district's 21st Century High School Programs -- will introduce students to the broad range of career choices the animal sciences industry has to offer.

 

 

 

 

T-rex in Second LIfeGeology project using Second Life to teach Kansas City, Junction City students
Iris Totten, an associate professor of geology at Kansas State University, and Molly Davies, an associate professor of geology at University of Missouri at Kansas City, designed TerraWorld, an island in Second Life, to help students learn geology in an interactive way. The programs are being piloted at Tolbert and Brookside charter high schools in Kansas City, Mo. In the fall, about 400 ninth-grade students at Junction City High School will start using the program.

 

 

 

 

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Environment

 

 

Grasshopper sparrow with grasshopper in its mouthK-State ecologist looks for answers as to why Flint Hills bird populations are declining
More research is needed before recommendations can be made to help manage these bird populations, but the results are still valuable because -- like a canary in a coal mine -- birds indicate a region's overall environmental health.

 

 

 

 

 

man on bicycleK-Staters research attitudes about biking, walking to work in Manhattan
Among the campus findings were that students were most likely to actively commute, then faculty members, and then staff. Women and men were equally interested in walking or biking. Older individuals were less likely to actively commute than younger individuals.

 

 

 

 

 

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Health

 

 

Doctor artK-State engineers helping Kansas safety net clinics operate more efficiently
Using data from clinics represented by the Kansas Association for the Medically Underserved, K-State researchers of industrial and manufacturing systems engineering are measuring which clinics are the most efficient and what lessons other clinics can learn from them.

 

 

 

 

 

radial nodesK-State engineers use computer models to examine how epidemics could spread in rural Kansas
With funding from the National Science Foundation, researchers are using academic models to study the spread of diseases in rural areas. Their goal is to identify optimal strategies to forecast and control disease outbreaks in rural areas. What are used as mitigation strategies in cities will not be so effective in rural areas, they say.

 

 

 

 

farmhouse in fieldK-State researchers making it easier for rural Kansans to stay in shape
In many Kansas communities, you have to have a car to be anywhere other than among grass and trees. It's a challenge among so-called frontier states: What looks like open space often is privately owned, used for agriculture and otherwise not suitable for recreation. Local parks often are not big enough for walking trails or skating facilities, while local streets may not be suitable for cyclists or pedestrians.

 

 

 

 

Jana Sorensen portraitUndergraduate researcher helps educate Kansas agricultural workers about hearing loss
Public education projects were typical during Sorensen's youth when she was a member of 4-H. She wanted to create another such project at K-State about hearing conservation and the importance of agricultural workers wearing hearing protection.

 

 

 

 

 

fresh fruitExtension brings healthy choices to kids in Kansas City, Kan.
Learning about food, nutrition, and health is helping youth in the Kansas City metropolitan area choose foods -- and activities -- that contribute to health, said Peggy Berrier Boyd, a K-State-Research and Extension agent. The educational afterschool program is part of Healthy Kids in KCK. Watch a slide show about the project.

 

 

 

 

 

drawing of house with radon coming outEducation program boosts radon testing in Kansas homes
The Kansas Radon Program uses K-State's statewide network of county and district offices to offer one-on-one information and do-it-yourself radon test kits -- at cost. As budget allows, the program also solicits mini-grant proposals to help agents build local awareness and promote radon testing.

 

 

 

 

 

red crossResearchers look to improve Hispanics' health in southwest Kansas communities
A healthy lifestyle is not a one-size-fits-all kind of method, according to Kansas State University researchers investigating the current health status of some heavily Hispanic communities in southwestern Kansas to provide direction and ideas for improving health in the future. The researchers partnered with various community organizations in Dodge City, Garden City and Liberal to get a current snapshot of Hispanic health in the cities through discussions with community leaders and surveys.

 

 

 

 

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Social and family issues

 

 

military familiesK-State addressing the impact of war with the new institute for the health and security of military families
Kansas State University has long partnered with Fort Riley to meet the needs of America's soldiers, a tradition that will continue with K-State's Institute for the Health and Security of Military Families.

 

 

 

 

 

cards and poker chipsK-State preparing Kansans for expanded gambling in the state
Among the campus findings were that students were most likely to actively commute, then faculty members, and then staff. Women and men were equally interested in walking or biking. Older individuals were less likely to actively commute than younger individuals.

 

 

 

 

 

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Transportation

 

 

Speed limit sign on gravel roadK-State engineers find that Kansas communities may be wasting money on speed limit signs on gravel roads
Among the campus findings were that students were most likely to actively commute, then faculty members, and then staff. Women and men were equally interested in walking or biking. Older individuals were less likely to actively commute than younger individuals.

 

 

 

 

 

man on bicycleK-Staters research attitudes about biking, walking to work in Manhattan
Among the campus findings were that students were most likely to actively commute, then faculty members, and then staff. Women and men were equally interested in walking or biking. Older individuals were less likely to actively commute than younger individuals.

 

 

 

 

 

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Directory

 

A list of programs, centers and people at K-State helping Kansans

 

 

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