1. K-State home
  2. »DCM
  3. »K-State News
  4. »News
  5. »K-State in the news today
  6. »K-Staters in the news — May 2015

K-State News

K-State News
Kansas State University
128 Dole Hall
1525 Mid-Campus Dr North
Manhattan, KS 66506

785-532-2535
785-532-7355 fax
media@k-state.edu

K-Staters in the news — May 2015

The top stories mentioning Kansas State University are posted below. Download an Excel file with all of this month's news stories.

Friday, May 29, 2015

*New study examines the possibility of a leadership gene
05/29/15 Washington Post
Researchers at Kansas State University and the National University of Singapore chose to look at that particular gene because past research has shown the body's dopamine systems are linked with things like motivation, impulsivity and self-regulation: all factors that could have an impact on leadership.
 
*U.S. Department of Homeland Security Joins McCarthy Mortenson NBAF A Joint Venture to Break Ground on $835 Million National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility
05/28/15 Bloomberg Business
The construction team was joined by representatives from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Department of Agriculture, the state of Kansas, Kansas State University, and the community of Manhattan, Kan.
 
*K-State Unveils Test for New Dog Flu Strain
05/28/15 Veterinary Practice News
The Kansas State Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory has added a canine influenza test designed to differentiate between the common H3N8 and emerging H3N2 strains.
 

Thursday, May 28, 2015

Officials break ground on federal bioscience lab in Kansas
May 27, 2015 The Washington Post via AP
A $1.25 billion animal research facility in Kansas will fill a vital role in protecting the nation’s food supply while also providing a boost to the state’s economy, federal officials said Wednesday at a groundbreaking ceremony for the National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility.

Drenching rains green pastures, bode well
May 28, 2015 The Daily Telegraph
"Nationally, range and pasture conditions are notably improved from last year and other recent periods of drought throughout the US," Kansas State University Extension beef specialist Glynn Tonsor said, adding that it means beef cow herds will expand as planned.

K-State research offers insight into new canine influenza
May 27, 2015 The Topeka Capital-Journal
Researchers at Kansas State University say they have a better understanding of the new strain of canine influenza that has sickened large numbers of Midwest dogs. Such new information, they say, might ultimately lead to development of a vaccine for the disease.

New Vaccines Could Protect Poultry and Humans from Bird Flu
May 27, 2015 IFLScience
"In Southeast Asia there are a lot of markets that sell live birds that people can buy and prepare at home," Kansas State University’s Jürgen Richt explains. "In contrast to the H5N1 virus that kills the majority of chickens in three to five days, chickens infected with the H7N9 virus do not show clinical signs of sickness. That means you could buy a bird that looks perfectly healthy but could be infected. If an infected bird is prepared for consumption, there is a high chance you could get sick, and about one in three infected people die."

 

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

*GMO Scientists Could Save the World From Hunger, If We Let Them
5/21/15 Newsweek
Ideally, we would know everything about the genome of all our favorite produce staples, down to the placement of every single gene. And this cataloging is happening with astonishing speed. Researchers at Kansas State University have sequenced the first and toughest of wheat's 20 chromosomes—and that one chromosome is far more complex than the entire rice genome. They say they'll be able to do the next 19 in three years. The result will be complete knowledge of the genome of the world's third-most cultivated crop, the one with the most protein and arguably the grain that is most versatile as a food and cooking source.

*Vaccines developed for H5N1, H7N9 avian influenza strains
5/25/15 Medical News Today
A recent study with Kansas State University researchers details vaccine development for two new strains of avian influenza that can be transmitted from poultry to humans. The strains have led to the culling of millions of commercial chickens and turkeys as well as the death of hundreds of people.

Phenotyping wheat breeding lines takes on new look
5/25/15 AgriLife Today
The instrumentation strapped to a bicycle wheel and the software, Phenocom, was prototyped last season by Jared Crain, Jesse Poland and other researchers at Kansas State University, Reddy said.

 

Monday, May 25, 2015

*Kansas State University Scientists Develop Vaccine For H5N1, H7N9 Avian Influenza Strains
5/23/15 International Business Times
Researchers at Kansas State University have developed a vaccine for two new strains of avian influenza that have been making their way across Asia, leaving hundreds of people dead and causing farmers to kill millions of animals.

Drenching rains green pastures, bode well for herd expansions
5/23/15 ABC News
"Nationally, range and pasture conditions are notably improved from last year and other recent periods of drought throughout the U.S.," Kansas State University Extension beef specialist Glynn Tonsor said.

NBAF was reached through difficulties
5/23/15 Wichita Eagle
On Wednesday we will celebrate the groundbreaking of the National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility in Manhattan at Kansas State University. (Letter from Sen. Pat Roberts).

 

Friday, May 22, 2015

27 veterinary schools receive $70,000 in scholarship funding from Bayer
05/21/15 Reuters
The winning veterinary students from the other schools in the 2015 Bayer Excellence in Communication Award program are: … Anna Champagne, Kansas State University
 
Gardening in a polluted paradise: Is it safe?
05/15/15 Science Daily
Researchers at Kansas State University have looked into how vegetables take up different soil contaminants. They also considered how different gardening practices could reduce this uptake. They found that, in the majority of examples, eating vegetables grown in the contaminated soils studied was safe.
 
Wind Turbines Drive Male Prairie Chickens Away From Mating Sites
05/21/15 Environmental Monitor
Prairie chickens provided an ideal target species, as they require plenty of space and are sensitive to habitat loss and fragmentation, said Brett Sandercock, co-author on the study and professor of wildlife ecology at Kansas State University. Conservation efforts directed at prairie chickens would likely benefit a whole range of grassland birds, he said, citing his past research that revealed shared habitat preferences between many ground-nesting species.


Thursday, May 21, 2015

*Your Genes May Influence Leadership Ability In The Workplace, Kansas State University Research Finds
May 20, 2015 BioSpace
The right genes may help you become an organization's next president or CEO. But the same genes may also hinder your leadership path, according to Kansas State University psychological sciences research.

*People Who Don't Subscribe To Moral Relativism Support Harsher Criminal Punishments
May 20, 2015 Science 2.0
Our belief in evil influences our feelings about capital punishment, according to Donald Saucier, associate professor of psychology at Kansas State University and Russell Webster at St. Mary's College of Maryland.

*K-State researchers developing bird flu vaccines
May 20, 2015 The Topeka Capital Journal online
A recent study by Kansas State University researchers explains vaccine development for two new strains of avian influenza that can be transmitted from poultry to humans. The strains have led to the culling of millions of commercial chickens and turkeys as well as the death of hundreds of people.

 

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Campus Rape May Be 'Worse Than We Thought,' Study Shows
5/20/15 Huffington Post
Kansas State University: Less than 1 percent said in a survey they'd experiences unwanted sexual contact at the school.

To garden, or not to garden? Study examines urban soil
5/19/15 Yahoo! News
"Fruiting vegetables, leafy vegetables and root vegetables all take up nutrients and accumulate contaminants differently and that's why we tested three different types of plants," says Ganga Hettiarachchi of Kansas State University.

Genes may influence leadership in the workplace
5/19/15 Science Daily
The right genes may help you become an organization's next president or CEO. But the same genes may also hinder your leadership path, according to Kansas State University psychological sciences research.

 

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Country of Origin Labeling: All Cost, No Benefit | Commentary
5/18/15 Roll Call
The USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service, which enforces COOL, has repeatedly said COOL is not a food safety program, but rather a marketing program. However, as a marketing program it is a failure. According to a 2012 Kansas State University study, typical U.S. consumers are unaware of country of origin labeling and do not look for meat origin information when purchasing beef, pork and chicken products.

Gardening in a polluted paradise: Is it safe?
5/18/15 OEN OpEd News
reen thumbs, do not fret. Pockets of soil in urban areas are still available for the increasingly popular practice of urban gardening. And while the proximity of these soils to pollution and industry can increase levels of contamination by harmful compounds, some scientists have found that the risks associated with gardening in these soils may not be as high as first thought. Researchers at Kansas State University have looked into how vegetables take up different soil contaminants.

US: high demand for Angus beef than for meat Choice
5/18/15 Beef Point (Portuguese) 
Demand for beef quality classified as USDA Choice increased by 9% in the first quarter, versus the same period in 2014, although spot prices in April for Choice beef have been $ 31 higher than the previous year according to the model K-State. The demand model of the University economist, Ted Schroder, and Cattle-Fax analyst Lance Zimmerman, has been updated from a graduation project created by Schroder in 2010.

 

Monday, May 18, 2015

*Do you believe in pure evil? Researchers say our views can decide whether we back the death penalty for criminals
5/17/15 UK Daily Mail Sunday
'We found that as people's beliefs in pure evil increased, they were more likely to support sentences like life in prison without parole and even the death penalty,' said Donald Saucier of Kansas State University, who looked at how beliefs in pure evil influenced how people treated those who committed crimes with Russell Webster at St. Mary's College of Maryland.

Jeni's Splendid Resumes Ice Cream Production After Listeria Recall
5/15/15 NASDAQ/Dow Jones Business News
Fadi Aramouni, a food-science professor at Kansas State University, said Jeni's "should have had these things in place all along." However, he said, the company's steps are a positive sign and "it's never too late to implement a good sanitation program."

*Garmin official donates $1 million to Kansas State
5/15/15 KCTV 5
He is a member of the Kansas State University Foundation's Presidents Club and the College of Engineering's Seaton Society.

Friday, May 15, 2015

*Funds for water conservation shrink, but will be focused on Great Plains
05/14/15 Miami Herald
The enormous underground aquifer supplies water to eight states from South Dakota to Texas, but it is quickly being drained. Seventy percent of the Ogallala’s water will be gone within 50 years if nothing is done, according to a Kansas State University study.
 
3 Kansas universities part of unmanned aerial system team
05/14/15 KCTV5
The Salina Journal reports Kansas State University, the University of Kansas and Wichita State University have been named members of the FAA's Center of Excellence for Unmanned Aircraft Systems. According to a news release, the center will focus on research, education and training for the systems that are also known as drones.
 
Ribbon Cut On Bulk Solids Innovation Center
05/14/15 KSAL
Officials gathered to celebrate a one-of-a kind facility that is now operating in Salina. A purple ribbon was cut to celebrate the official grand opening of the  Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center.


Thursday, May 14, 2015

* Study: Spring heat poses greater danger to wheat yields
May 13, 2015 Huffington Post
WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — Spring heat poses a greater danger to winter wheat crops than early freezes in the fall, according to a new Kansas State University study that highlights the need develop more heat-tolerant varieties as climate change increases global temperatures.

* Blue Key awards scholarships to K-State students
May 13, 2015 Manhattan Mercury
Kansas State University’s chapter of Blue Key, the senior honorary, has awarded scholarships to several students for the 2015-2016 academic school year.

Veterinarians Discuss Limb Deformities
May 13, 2015 The Horse
Nearly 100 practitioners crammed into one room during the 2014 American Association of Equine Practitioners' (AAEP) Convention, held Dec. 6-10 in Salt Lake City, Utah, to discuss flexural and angular limb deformities with Larry Bramlage, DVM, MS, Dipl. ACVS, of Rood & Riddle Equine Hospital, in Lexington, Kentucky, and Elizabeth Santschi, DVM, Dipl. ACVS, now a professor of equine surgery at the Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine in Manhattan.

 

Tuesday, May 12, 2015

A taste for risk: Looking into Canada's household debt
5/11/15 MSN Canada
"It's an emotional experience, when you're paying with cash. That provides some checks and balances," said financial psychologist Brad Klontz, a professor at Kansas State University. "We're not even using money any more, we're swiping cards – it becomes unconscious.

7 Healthy Foods You're Not Eating 
5/11/15 MSN
Call these nature's steroids: A number of studies have shown that consuming beets can improve your athletic performance. Drinking beet juice caused a 38 percent increase in blood flow to muscles, particularly "fast twitch" muscles that affect quick bursts of speed and strength, a study conducted at Kansas State University showed.

NC State's NextGen Air Transportation program will work with a consortium of research universities to help the FAA safely integrate unmanned aerial vehicles into the national airspace
5/12/15 Bloomberg Businessweek
Besides NC State, the ASSURE alliance comprises Mississippi State University, Drexel University, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Kansas State University, Montana State University, New Mexico State University, Ohio State University, Oregon State University, University of Alabama-Huntsville, University of Alaska-Fairbanks, University of California, Davis, University of Kansas, University of North Dakota, and Wichita State University; associate members include Auburn University, Concordia, Indiana State University, Louisiana Tech University, Tuskegee University, and University of Southampton.

 

Monday, May 11, 2015

*K-State is first area college to release results of climate survey
5/9/15 Kansas City Star
Results of the first-ever comprehensive survey to see how students, faculty and staff feel being on Kansas State University’s campus are in, and most said they’re fairly comfortable, but there’s work needed on sexual conduct as well as gender and race inclusion.

WSU, K-State and KU part of new drone research center
5/8/15 Wichita Eagle
Kansas State University and the University of Kansas are also part of the team, whose name is Alliance for System Safety of UAS through Research Excellence.

*K-State to add drone cybersecurity training
5/10/15 Washington Times
Kansas State University is expanding into drone cybersecurity training.

Friday, May 8, 2015

Decade Of Change For College Students: Less Religious, More Diverse And Lonely
05/05/15 Huffington Post
Pilot programs at some large universities have showed that converting classes to "open educational resources" can yield tremendous savings for students. One program at UMass-Amherst that cost $60,000 saved an estimated $851,530 for students. Another at Kansas State University that cost $96,250 up front resulted in $1.11 million in student savings.
 
Giving a cat a pill takes patience, persuasion
05/08/15 Hartford Courant
Here's the million-dollar question: Are you using a flea preventive on all pets in the home or just the dogs? According to veterinary parasitologist Dr. Michael Dryden, of Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Manhattan, "you also need to protect the cats, even if they're indoors only. People tend to protect their dogs, which is wonderful. Then, the fleas go to whomever they can bite, and they're happy to take their blood meal from the cats."
 
Research Says Origin Labeling Hurts Economy
05/07/15 WHO-TV
New research from Kansas State University suggests that USDA’s controversial country of origin labeling rule will have a negative economic impact, because it increases compliance costs without quantifiable benefits.

Thursday, May 7, 2015

*Study finds moderate amount of exercise may make cancer treatments more effective
May 6, 2015 Fox 28
(CNN) Cancer patients may have a new tool to fight the disease, exercise. A study from Kansas State University says slow jogs and brisk walks could help with cancer treatments. The researchers say moderate workouts could increase the oxygenation of tumors which may improve treatments in cancer patients. However, moderation is key.

Virtual Classroom, Real Value: Value Colleges Releases 2015 Ranking of Top 50 Best Value Online MBA Programs
5/6/15 Bloomberg
Value Colleges, an independent online guide to the best values in undergraduate and graduate college education, has published its 2015 ranking of the Top 50 Best Value Online MBA Programs and includes Kansas State University College of Business Administration.

Secretary of Homeland Security to deliver Landon Lecture
5/4/15 San Francisco Gate
The secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Jeh Johnson, will deliver a Landon Lecture on May 27 at Kansas State University.

The threat of tick-borne diseases growing across the U.S.
5/6/15 Chicago Tribune
There are more ticks in more places than ever, and they continue to spread. Veterinary parasitologist Dr. Michael Dryden, of Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine-Manhattan, calls it a "tick explosion."

 

Tuesday, May 5, 2015

Heavy rain floods roads, submerges cars across the Plains
5/5/15 Weather Channel
Photos out of Kansas show people wading in water up to their knees and floodwaters reaching up to vehicle bumpers. Manhattan is the home of Kansas State University, and campus police asked people to avoid campus roads.

Moderate exercise may make cancer treatments more effective
5/4/15 Health News Report
Kansas State University kinesiology research offers encouraging information for cancer patients: A brisk walk or a slow jog on a regular basis may be the key to improved cancer treatments.

Kansas and Missouri beef farmers cashing in on high prices
5/4/15 Washington Times
In time the increased supply of cows should stabilize beef prices at the grocery counter, said Glynn Tonsor, an agricultural economist at Kansas State University.

 

Monday, May 4, 2015

Secretary of Homeland Security to deliver Landon Lecture
5/4/15 Washington Times
The secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Jeh Johnson, will deliver a Landon Lecture on May 27 at Kansas State University.

Are you aware of these health hazards in your kitchen?
5/4/15 Yahoo! Health
“In general our food is very safe, but there are also things consumers can do help prevent problems,” says Jeannie Sneed, Ph.D., research professor at Kansas State University and author of a new study about how consumers’ food-handling habits can lead to food contamination.

Getting started: Wallet Hub quiz puts your money know-how to the test
5/4/15 Wichita Eagle
Cliff Robb, an associate professor at the Institute of Personal Financial Planning at Kansas State University, said young people tend to be less informed about specific financial products.


Friday, May 1, 2015

What are the 10 best companies for new dads?
04/30/15 USA Today
"It's pretty simple, paternity leave is not just good for the child, but also the marriage and ultimately the employer," says Jared Durtschi, an assistant professor in the Marriage and Family Therapy Program, at Kansas State University.
 
'Pilling' a cat takes patience and purrsuation
04/30/15 Chicago Tribune
Here's the million-dollar question: Are you using a flea preventive on all pets in the home or just the dogs? According to veterinary parasitologist Dr. Michael Dryden, of Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Manhattan, "you also need to protect the cats, even if they're indoors only. People tend to protect their dogs, which is wonderful. Then, the fleas go to whomever they can bite, and they're happy to take their blood meal from the cats."
 
Kansas State awards $500K in grants for global food research
04/30/15 KCTV 5
Kansas State University has awarded $500,000 in grants to faculty members who are researching way to boost food production as the world population grows.