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K-State Today

July 10, 2017



Three psychological sciences faculty elected as fellows over the past year

By Michael Young

Over the past year, three professors in the Department of Psychological Sciences were elected as fellows in national scientific organizations. Each was selected as a result of their national and international reputations in their respective areas of scientific expertise.

In summer 2016, Donald Saucier was elected as a fellow of the Society for Experimental Social Psychology and as a fellow of Division 9, or Psychological Study of Social Issues, of the American Psychological Association. Saucier studies expressions of antisocial and prosocial behaviors; he is especially well known for his research on prejudice. He was promoted to full professor this spring and serves as the undergraduate program director for the department.

In December 2016, Gary Brase was elected as a fellow of the Association of Psychological Science. Brase's research is concerned with evolutionary approaches to the study of human rationality with a particular focus on judgments under uncertainty and social decision making. He currently serves as the department's graduate program director.

This year, Kimberly Kirkpatrick also was elected as a fellow of the Association of Psychological Science. Kirkpatrick studies the role of timing and reward processes in impulsive and risky choice in rats as a model of human decision making. She also is a fellow of Divisions 3, or Experimental Psychology and Cognitive Science, and 6, or Behavioral Neuroscience and Comparative Psychology, of the American Psychological Association.

These professors join three colleagues in psychological science who are fellows in national scientific societies:  Laura Brannon, professor, Society for Experimental Social Psychology; Mary Cain, professor, Division 6 of American Psychological Association; and Michael Young, professor, Division 3 of American Psychological Association.