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K-State Today

December 16, 2014



Recent publications, presentations by English department faculty, students

By Karin Westman

During the fall semester, faculty in the English department published 16 works:

  • Traci Brimhall, assistant professor, published the poem "How to Survive the Revolution" in the collection "Best American Poetry 2014," page 11. Brimhall also published the poem "In My Third Trimester, I Dream My Own Death" in the journal Crab Orchard Review vol. 19.1, 2014, page 19, and poems "The Old Miracles Return on Victoria Cruziana," "The Fate of Maria Jose da Cruz's Seven Faiths," and "Belterra Exodus" in the journal Poet Lore vol. 109.3/4, 2014, pages 111-114.

  • Mark Crosby, assistant professor, published "'till all law is annihilated': Godwin versus the Bar" in the journal Nineteenth-Century Prose vol. 41: 1/2, 2014, pages 313-334.

  • Elizabeth Dodd, university distinguished professor, published the essay "'The Grand Word Whither': Review of No Need of Sympathy by Fleda Brown" and poems "Mirror Neurons" and "Inflection Studies" in the journal Miramar 2, 2014, pages 47-49 and 180-83. Dodd also published the essay "Constellation" in the anthology "The Tallgrass Reader," University of Iowa Press, 2014, pages 333-345.

  • Don Hedrick, professor, published "Distracting Othello: Tragedy and the Rise of Magic" in the journal PMLA vol. 129.4, 2014, pages 649-71.

  • Katy Karlin, associate professor, published the story "How to Live in the Midwest" in the journal New Letters vol. 80.3/4, 2014, pages 59-63.

  • James Machor and Amy Blair, published the journal issue Reception: Texts, Readers, Audiences, History vol. 8, 2014.

  • Philip Nel, university distinguished professor, published "Nightmare Neighbors, Dream Collaborators: Mark Newgarden and Megan Montague Cash on Bow-Wow, Comics, Picture Books and Telling Stories Without Words" in The Comics Journal, Nov. 3, 2014.

  • Lisa Tatonetti, associate professor, published "The Queerness of Native American Literature," Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2014.

  • Karin Westman, associate professor and department head; Naomi Wood, professor; and David Russell published the journal issue The Lion and the Unicorn vol. 38.3, 2014.

Faculty, graduate students, and undergraduate students in the English department also presented 27 conference papers, invited talks and readings:

  • Cydney Alexis, Rebecca Nowacek and Matthew Capdevielle presented "On the Generative Power of Not Knowing" at the International Writing Centers Association and National Conference on the Peer Tutoring of Writing Conference on Oct. 31 in Orlando, Florida.

  • Traci Brimhall, presented a reading of six new poems at Poet Lore's 125th Anniversary Reading at the Folger Shakespeare Library on Sept. 15 in Washington, D.C. Brimhall also presented "Tuning Your Tension" Writing Workshop in Raleigh, North Carolina, on Oct. 11, and a reading at the 8th Street Taproom Reading Series on Oct. 19 in Lawrence.

  • Gregory Eiselein, professor, and Jenna Brack, Emily Lehning, Carlie Ness and Charles Sanders presented "Making a Case for Collaboration" at the Association of College and University Housing Officers – International Living-Learning Programs Conference on Oct. 25 in Kansas City, Missouri.

  • Susan Elder, undergraduate student, presented "Teaming to Fight for Writer Authority" Workshop at the International Writing Centers Association-National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing Joint Conference on Nov. 1 in Orlando, Florida.

  • James Hunter Gilson, graduate student, presented "Foucault's Writing Center: The Writing Center as an Underground Heterotopic Space" at the International Writing Centers Association-National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing Joint Conference on Nov. 1 in Orlando, Florida.

  • Christina Hauck, associate professor, presented "Alternating Currents: Film, Electricity and Narrative Duplicity in 'Brief Encounter'" at the Midwest Popular Culture Association and the Midwest American Studies Association on Oct. 5 in Indianapolis, Indiana.

  • Sara Hernandez, undergraduate student, and Brent Weaver, undergraduate student, presented "It's a Small World After All: Writing Against Racism" at the International Writing Centers Association-National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing Joint Conference on Oct. 31 in Orlando, Florida.

  • Elizabeth Hoyt, graduate student, presented "Saving Childhood: Pilot as Intermediary in Antoine de Saint Exupéry's 'Le Petit Prince'" at the Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association Conference on Oct. 31 in Riverside, California.

  • Michele Janette, associate professor, presented "'Transform and Transfigure Me': Monique Truong's Historical Refashionings in 'Bitter in the Mouth'" at the National Women's Studies Association Conference on Oct. 14 in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

  • Mary Kohn, assistant professor, presented "Acoustic Analysis, Data Extraction, and Data Visualization" at the Week-Long Linguistics Workshop at West Virginia University on Nov. 17-21 in Morgantown, West Virginia. Kohn also presented an invited talk "'People Say I Sound Country': African American English and the Localized Sound of an Ethnolect" at West Virginia University on Nov. 19 in Morgantown, West Virginia.

  • Allison Kuehne, graduate student, presented "'Daughters of the Air': Transforming and Transcending the Page in Robert Sabuda's Pop-Up Adaptation of Hans Christian Andersen's 'The Little Mermaid'" at the Midwest Popular Culture Association on Oct. 5 in Indianapolis, Indiana.

  • Jesse Lobbs, graduate student, presented "Garden Living: Welty's 'A Curtain of Green'" at the South Central Modern Language Association Conference on Oct. 19 in Austin, Texas.

  • Theresa Merrick, instructor, presented "Promoting Lifelong Writing Learning: Applications of the Johari Window in the Engineering Classroom" at the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers International Professional Communication Conference on Oct. 13 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

  • Philip Nel, university distinguished professor, presented "How to Read Uncomfortably: Affect, Power, and Resisting Racist Children's Books" at the American Studies Association Annual Meeting on Nov. 9 in Los Angeles, California. Nel also presented "Crockett Johnson and Ruth Krauss: How an Unlikely Couple Found Love, Dodged the FBI, and Transformed Children's Literature" at the Rowayton Historical Society on Sept. 26 Rowayton, Connecticut, and an invited talk "Not So Simple: The Genius of Crockett Johnson's 'Harold and the Purple Crayon'" at the University of Connecticut on Sept. 24 in Storrs, Connecticut.

  • Kara Northway, Pam Bromley, and Eliana Schonberg presented "'Something that stays with you' or 'Oh, I learned this in the Writing Center!': A Mixed-Method, Cross-Institutional Study of Transfer" at the International Writing Centers Association-National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing Joint Conference on Nov. 1 in Orlando, Florida.

  • Kristin Selby, graduate student, and alumni Alicia Beeson, Brittney Tyler Millholland, and Meggie Romick, all 2014 master's degree graduates, presented "Imagining New Methods for Creating More Productive Long-term Tutoring Relationships" at the International Writing Centers Association-National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing Joint Conference on Oct. 31 in Orlando, Florida.

  • Shana Schmidt, undergraduate student, and Kayla Smalley, undergraduate student, presented "The Writing Center as a 'Borderland'" at the International Writing Centers Association-National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing Joint Conference on Nov. 1 in Orlando, Florida.

  • David Smit, professor, and Richard Hoag presented "The Rhetoric of Designing Graphic Displays Combining Text and Image" at the Biannual Conference of the Design Communication Association on Oct. 3 in Marietta, Georgia.

  • Joy Smith, instructor, presented "Mournful Melancholy: The Natural and Supernatural in Louisa May Alcott's 'Elegies'" at the South Central Modern Language Association Conference on Oct. 22 in Austin, Texas.

  • Grant Stucky, undergraduate student, presented "Creeping Shadows in the Writing Center: Gaining Awareness of Ineffective Writing Tutor Pedagogy" at the International Writing Centers Association-National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing Joint Conference on Oct. 30 in Orlando, Florida.

  • Adam Szetela, graduate student, presented "'They Labored for Hours, Rep after Rep': An Interdisciplinary Study of Labor Symbolism in American Bodybuilding" at the South Central Modern Language Association Conference on Oct. 19 in Austin, Texas.

  • Lisa Tatonetti presented "Female Masculinity, Affect, and Two-Spirit Traces in the Work of Thirza Cuthand" at the Western Literature Association Conference on Nov. 6 in Victoria, British Columbia.

  • Naomi Wood, professor, presented "A Lie, a Pretty Story, or a Map? Terry Pratchett's Deconstruction of Religions of the Book in 'The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents'" at the American Academy of Religion Conference on Nov. 24 in San Diego, California.