2003-2004 Provost Lecture Series

Comforting the Afflicted and Afflicting the Comfortable: Teaching Heroes and Warrior-Pacifists
Thursday, December 4, 2003
10:30am to 12:00pm
Hemisphere Room
5th Floor, Hale Library

Dr. Andrew Barkley
2003-2004 Coffman Chair for Distinguished Teaching Scholars, and
Professor of Agricultural Economics, Kansas State University

Biographical sketch:
Dr. Barkley teaches three courses: (1) an entry-level course, Principles of Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness, (2) a distance education course in International Agriculture and the Global Economy, and (3) a senior-level course in International Agricultural Trade. Dr. Barkley's research interests are in international trade, organic agriculture, and the assessment of teaching and research programs in higher education. He received a B.A. from Whitman College in Walla Walla, Washington, and a M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. He has taught courses in economics at the University of Chicago, Kansas State University, Quaid-I-Azam University in Islamabad, Pakistan, the University of Arizona, and the University of Cambridge in Cambridge, England.
Abstract:

Teaching is hard work. Why do we teach? Diverse answers to this query will be explored using economic principles and personal perspectives. Evidence will be presented to demonstrate that University teaching is increasingly important and interesting. As a result, enhanced teaching effectiveness provides enormous personal, professional, and social benefits. Teachers who accept and confront paradox, contradiction, and adversity receive three of life's highest rewards: (1) learning something new, (2) conquering a difficult challenge, and (3) helping students to achieve their personal and professional goals. Strategies for pursuing effective teaching and enhanced student learning will be discussed, using characteristics of "teaching heroes" and "warrior-pacifists" for guidance and inspiration. "To give anything less than your best is to sacrifice the gift." -Steve Prefontaine