Annotated List of UGE Courses

This annotated list presents the courses that are currently approved for University General Education credit.  For a complete historical listing, see the Official Registrar's UGE Course List maintained by the Office of the Registrar. UGE Courses are listed here by college only for ease of reference. Each college determines which of these courses will be accepted for their students' University General Education requirements. Students must consult with their advisors.

All UGE courses approved by KSU Faculty Senate as of March 9, 2010.
Agriculture Education
Architecture, Planning & Design Engineering
Arts & Sciences Human Ecology
Business Administration Technology & Aviation

 

 

College of Agriculture

AGEC 120. Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness. (3) I, II. A course suggested for all students interested in the agricultural economy. A study of economic principles, with emphasis on their application to the solution of farm, agribusiness, and agricultural industry problems in relationship to other sectors of the United States economy and foreign countries. No prerequisite. Three hours lec. a week.

AGEC 202. Small Business Operations. (3) I. Opportunities in business ownership, principles governing the starting of a small enterprise; importance, status, problems, and management of a small business.  For non-majors. Pr.: ECON 110 or AGEC 120 or ECON 120.

AGEC 318. Food and Agribusiness Management. (3) I, II. A study of marketing, production, risk, and financial management in agribusiness firms. Particular attention is given to the application of economic principles to the management of marketing and farm supply firms. Pr.: AGEC 120 or ECON 120; and MATH 100.

AGEC 420. Commodity Futures. (3) I, II. This course is designed to introduce students to the purpose, operation and use of commodity futures and options markets.  The objectives are to: (1) understand why futures exchanges and commodity futures contracts exist; (2) understand and be able to forecast basis; (3) understand hedging and be able to design hedging strategies for various commodity producers and users; (4) understand both put and call options and their potential use in a commodity risk management program; and (5) understand the usefulness and shortcomings of fundamental and technical analysis. Pr.: AGEC 120 or ECON 120.

AGEC 525. Natural Resource and Environmental Economics.
(3) I. Emphasis on the application of demand, supply, and price concepts in the study of natural resource use, policies, and management. Interdependence between environmental quality and economic actions are examined through discussion of property rights, economic incentives, externalities and economic components of environmental policies. Pr.: AGECON 120 or ECON 120 or ECON 110 and junior standing.


AGEC 610. Current Agricultural and Natural Resource Policy Issues.
(3) II. Current Issues in agricultural and natural resource policy from divergent perspectives. Classroom discussion, debate, writing assignments, and student presentations. Current events are analyzed and synthesized from both economic and non-economic perspectives. Topics may include environmentsl issues, international agricultural development, the politics of farm programs, and the relationship between technology, agriculture, and society. Pr.: AGEC 505 and either AGEC 525 or AGEC 410. 


AGRON 335. Environmental Quality.
(3) I. An examination and survey of topics in environmental quality. Includes classification of soil, air, and water pollutants and their interaction with the environment, including the human food chain. Discussion of remediation techniques, risk assessment, and environmental legislation. Three lectures a week. Pr.: CHM 110 or 210.

ASI 303. History and Attitude of Animal Use. (3) II. A short history of animal use and the livestock industry; attitudes towards animals; the symbiotic bond between humans and animals; the contribution of animals of food, fiber, work, and recreation; animal well-being; the interaction of livestock production and the environment; and ethical issues about using animals for research, food, and recreation. Three hours of lec./rec. a week. Interactive discussion will be emphasized, no prerequisites.

ASI 330. The Horse as A Window to the World. (3) I. A general education course using the horse as an organizing theme for exploration of many of the aspects of evolution, comparative physiology, economics, ethics, multiculturalism and esthetics. Designed for students in any major.

ASI 595. Contemporary Issues in Animal Science and Agriculture. (3) II. The development and management of current issues affecting animal agriculture and science in three primary areas: (1) how do issues develop; (2) the political aspects of issues; and (3) the development of expertise based on objective assessment. Current issues such as animal welfare/rights, environment, genetic engineering, etc., will be used to provide students with practical learning experiences. Recommended Pr.: Junior standing.

ENTOM 301. Insects and People. (3) I. Intended for undergraduate non-majors as part of the university general education curriculum. The focus will be on the global impact of insects and their relatives on human concerns, from acting as disease vectors, agricultural pests, and pollinators to their roles in art, history, and religion. Two hours lec. and one one-hour interactive session a week.

FOR 375. Introduction to Natural Resource Management. (3) I. A survey of historic and present-day uses, problems, and basic management approaches associated with our renewable and nonrenewable natural resources. The impact of society, economics, law, politics, and philosophy on the management and use of our natural resources will also be examined. Three hours lec. a week.

GENAG 450.Citizenship and Ethics in Agriculture. (3) II.The study of agriculture's relationship with society while encompassing ethics and personal personal development. Current controversial issues and multidimensional policy topics facing the agricultural industry will be explored with an emphasis on moral and philosophical debates. Issues regarding professional ethics and decision making will also be an emphasis. Pr.: Course work or experience in leadership and agriculture. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: Junior or senior standing.

GENAG 582. Natural Resources/Environmental Sciences Project (NRES). (3) I, II. The study of agriculture's relationship with society while encompassing ethics and personal development. Current controversial issues and multidimentional policy topics facing the agricultural industry will be explored with an emphasis on moral and philosophical debates. Issues regarding professional ethics and decision making will also be an emphasis. Pr.: Course work or experience in leadership and agriculture. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: Junior or senior standing.

HORT 210. Concepts of Floral Design. (3) I. An introduction to the use of flowers and related products with emphasis on fundamentals of design. Two hours rec. and three hours studio a week. For majors or non-majors.

HORT 256. Human Dimensions of Horticulture. (3) I, II. Introduction to horticulture applied in schools, psychiatric and medical hospitals, corrections, vocational rehabilitation centers, elderly programs, and consumer horticulture settings. Networking the art and science of horticulture with architecture, business, social sciences, health care, horticulture, and education. Two hours lec. and one hour rec. a week.

PLPTH 300. Microbes, Plants, and the Human Perspective. (3) II The relationship of the biological world (specifically microbes) to our personal and cultural perceptions of how the world works and what our place is in it. The course focuses on microbes as they interact with plants, the plant environment, and the human connection to plants as a resource. Topics include: events and historical context of germ theory, symbiosis as a biological phenomenon and analogue for human social structure, and popular perception of genetically-engineered plants and microbes.

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College of Architecture, Planning, & Design

ARCH 240. Science, Technology, and Architecture. (3) I, II, S. An exploration of the interrelationships between architecture and various sciences including the technological applications of selected scientific theories.

ARCH 290. Architecture Through the Ages. (3) I, II, S (periodically). An introductory survey of the history of architecture worldwide from its prehistoric beginnings up to the present day. May not be taken for credit by students enrolled in the College of Architecture, Planning, and Design.

ARCH 301. Appreciation of Architecture. (3) I, II, S. An analysis of the evolution of architectural styles to determine the relation of architectural expression to the needs of society. Three hours rec. a week. May not be taken for credit by students enrolled in the architecture, landscape architecture, or interior architecture curricula.

IAPD 300. Design and Material Culture.  (3) I, II.   People's personal characteristics or social position can be expressed by the products they purchase, the possessions they own, and the physical environments they create.  design has become a major factor influencing one's final decision for purchasing these products.  This course, examines material culture which is created from the influences of human behavior, design, history, marketing, economics, politics, geography, the arts, and sociology.

LAR 322. Environmental Issues and Ethics. (3) II. An introduction to the relationship of the natural environment to the life within it and as a factor in environmental design ethic. Three hours lec. a week.

PLAN 315. Introduction to City Planning. (3) II. The origins and evolution of planning in response to economic, social, political, and physical problems. The planning process and its relationship to the design professions and the social and behavioral sciences. Three hours recitation a week. Pr.: Sophomore standing and ENGL 100.

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College of Arts & Sciences

AERO 210. Aerospace Studies 2A. (1) II. The development of air power from its beginnings to the end of World War II. It traces the development of various concepts of employment of air power. One hour of class a week.

AERO 211. Aerospace Studies 2B. (1) I. The development of air power from the close of World War II to the present. It focuses upon factors which have prompted research and technological change and stresses significant examples of the impact of air power on strategic thought. One hour of class a week.

AERO 310. Officer Leadership Studies 3A. (3) I. A study of USAF professionalism, leadership, and management. Includes the meaning of professionalism, professional responsibilities, leadership theory, functions and practices, management principles and functions, problem solving, and management tools, practices, and controls. Three hours of class a week.

AERO 311. Officer Leadership Studies 3B. (3) I. Continuation of AERO 310. Three hours of class a week.

AERO 410. Aerospace Studies/Regional Studies and Defense Policy. (3) I, II.  This course will examine the role of the professional officer in a democratic society; socialization processes within the armed services; the requisites for maintaining adequate national security forces; political, economic, and social constraints upon the overall defense policy-making process.  Three hours a week.

AMETH 160. Introduction to American Ethnic Studies. (3) I, II. This course introduces students to the major concepts related to ethnicity and to some of the major American ethnic groups.

ANTH 204. A General Education Introduction to Cultural Anthropology. (3) I, II, S. Introduction to ethnology and ethnography; analysis and comparison of technological, social, and religious characteristics of cultural systems. Not available for credit to students who have credit in ANTH 200.

ANTH 399. Honors Seminar in Anthropology. (1-3) I, II (odd years only). Readings and discussion of selected topics. Open to non-majors in the honors program.

ANTH 503. Archaeological Fact or Fiction. (3) I, in even years. Evaluation of popular beliefs about the human past through the application of critical thinking skills. Topics include ancient North American inscriptions, Vikings in the Americas, the moundbuilder myth, lost civilizations, and advanced prehistoric technology. Pr.: ANTH 260 or equiv.

ANTH 505. South Asian Civilizations. (3) I, in even years. Interdisciplinary survey on the development of civilization in India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan, and Afghanistan, including geography, philosophy, social, economic, political institutions, and historical movements. Pr.: 3 hours of social science or junior standing. Same as ECON 505, GEOG 505, HIST 505, POLSCI 505, SOCIO 505.

ANTH 524. Immigrant America. (3) I, II. Discussion of post-1965 immigration to the United States with a focus on Asian and Latino newcomers. Immigrant adaptation, economic strategies and the reinterpretation of cultural identity. Implications for American society. Pr.: ANTH 200, 204, or 210.

ART 100. 2-Dimensional Design. (3) I, II. Introduction to and laboratory practice in the principles and elements of design. Emphasis is placed on organizational command of the two-dimensional picture plane and issues of illusion. Six hours lab.

ART 190. Drawing I. (3) I, II. Fundamentals of drawing as applied to the realistic and expressive representation of objects through the use of a variety of media and approaches. Six hours lab.

ART 195. Survey of Art History I. (3) I, II. Historical development of art from pre-history through the Middle Ages.

ART 196. Survey of Art History II. (3) I. Historical development of art from the Renaissance to the nineteenth century.

ART 399. Honors Seminar in Art. (3) Selected topics in art. Pr.: For students in the honors program only.

ART 560. Art for the Exceptional Individual. (3) I, II. Using art concepts and activities to meet the needs of the mentally deficient, physically impaired, emotionally disturbed, or gifted. Three hours lec. Pr.: PSYCH 110. Same as EDCI 560.

BIOCH 110. Biochemistry and Society. (3) I. Biochemically oriented topics related to aspects of daily living.  Development of knowledge and skills for understanding bioscience information in news media and the internet.  Selected biochemical concepts with applications to humans, such as: chemical principles and biomolecules, nutrition/diets, growth and aging, disease, fermentation, drug action, medical diagnostics and forensics, and bioethics.  Intended for nonscience majors.

BIOCH 111. Biochemistry and Society Laboratory. (1) I, S. Experiments to promote understanding of chemicals and reactions in living systems. Three hours lab a week.  Intended for nonscience majors.  Pr.: BIOCH 110 or conc. enrollment.

BIOCH 265. Introductory Organic and Biochemistry. (5) I, II. For students in human ecology, nursing, and other areas desiring an integrated organic and biochemistry course to provide an understanding of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, and digestive and metabolic systems. Three hours lec. and six hours lab a week. Pr.: CHM 110.

BIOCH 399. Honors Seminar in Biochemistry. (3) II. Lecture, guided reading, and discussion of topics of general interest in biochemistry. Topics will vary depending on the interests and backgrounds of students enrolled. Pr.: Freshman Honors Seminar.

BIOL 198. Principles of Biology. (4) I, II, S (Manhattan campus); II, S (Salina campus). An introductory course for majors and non-majors focusing on plants, animals and microbes. Specific areas covered include biological molecules, cells, genetics, energy flow, physiology, ecology, and evolution. Two two-hour studio sessions incorporating lec. and lab elements.

BIOL 330. Public Health Biology. (3) I. Fundamental concepts of human infectious and organic diseases with emphasis on disease etiology and mechanisms, collection of epidemiological data, and the influences upon, and consequences of, governmental public health policy. Two hours lec. and one hour rec. per week. Pr: BIOL 198.

BIOL 399. Honors Seminar in Biology. (1-3) II. Selected topics. Open to non-majors in the honors program.

CHINE 101. Chinese I. (4) I. Introduction to the fundamental linguistics and cultural characteristics of the Chinese language and its writing systems.


CHINE 102. Chinese II. (4) I. Continuation of Chinese I. Development of functional skills for familiar situations. Pr.: CHINE 101.


CHINE 201. Chinese III. (5) II. Continuation of Chinese II. Further development of functional skills. Intensive practice of spoken and written Chinese. Pr.: CHINE 102.


CHINE 202. Chinese IV. (5) I. Continuation of Chinese III. Presentation of more advanced elements of the Chinese language, with intensive practice of spoken and written Chinese. Pr.: CHINE 201.

CHM 110. General Chemistry. (3) I, II, S (Manhattan campus); I, II (Salina campus). Principles, laws, and theories of chemistry; important metallic and nonmetallic substances. (An optional laboratory course, CHM 111, is available for an additional hour of credit). Three hours lec. a week. Pr.: MATH 010 or at least one year of high school algebra.

CHM 111. General Chemistry Laboratory. (1) I, II, S. A laboratory course to supplement the material of CHM 110. Three hours lab a week. Pr.: CHM 110 or conc. enrollment.

CHM 210. Chemistry I. (4) I, II, S (Manhattan campus); I, S (Salina campus). First course of a two-semester study of the principles of chemistry and the properties of the elements and their compounds. Three hours lec. and concurrent enrolment in CHM 210 Lab. Pr.: One year of high school chemistry and MATH 100 (or two years of high school algebra).

CHM 220. Honors Chemistry I. (5) I. First course of a two-semester study of chemical principles.  Intended for students with a strong background in chemistry.  Conc. enrollment in CHM 220 lab is required. Four hours lec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: One year of high school chemistry and MATH 100 (or two years of high school algebra); ACT Composite of 26 or higher.

CHM 230. Chemistry II. (4) I, II, S. Second course of a two-semester study of the principles of chemistry and the properties of the elements and their compounds. Conc. enrollment in CHM 230 lab is required. Three hours lec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: CHM 210.

CHM 250. Honors Chemistry II. (5) II. Continuation of CHM 220, covering the principles of chemistry.  Pr.: CHM 220

CHM 315. Environmental Science: A Chemistry Perspective. (3) I. An analysis of important technological developments and their impact on society and on the earth's environment; ethical issues raised by technological advances. History, matter and energy, ecosystems, population issues, air pollution, water pollution, hazardous substances, environmental policies, and decision making are discussed. Pr.: CHM 210 or 250.

CHM 350. General Organic Chemistry. (3) I, II, S. A survey of types of organic reactions important to biological science, including pre-veterinary and certain agriculture and human ecology programs. Conc. enrollment in CHM 351 is urged. Three hours lec. a week. Pr.: CHM 230 or 250.

CHM 351. General Organic Chemistry Laboratory. (2) I, II, S. One five-hour lab and one hour of lec. a week. Pr. or conc. enrollment: CHM 350.

CHM 399. Honors Seminar. (3) I. Open to students in the arts and sciences honors program.

CHM 650. History of Chemistry. (2) II, in even years. Traces the beginnings of chemistry from 3500 B.C. to 1920 A.D. Early metallurgy, Greek thought about atoms, alchemy, atomic theory, discovery of gases; definition of elements, chemical bonds, organic, inorganic, and physical chemistry. Pr.: CHM 550, 532, 595, and 598; CHM 230 or 250.

COMM 120. Introduction to Human Communication. (3) I. An introduction to the traditions, foundations and contexts of human communication that are studied and practiced in society.

COMM 311. Business and Professional Speaking. (3) I, II. Principles and practice of speaking in an organizational setting. Areas of emphasis will be oral reports, interviewing, interpersonal communication, and working in groups. Pr.: COMM 105 or COMM 106.

COMM 321. Public Speaking II. (3) I, II. Advanced principles and practice of speech composition, audience adaptation, and delivery. Pr.: COMM 105 or COMM 106.

COMM 325. Argumentation and Debate. (3) II. Basic theories of argumentation with emphasis on the construction and criticism of will reasoned and supported positions. Pr.: COMM 105 or COMM 106.

COMM 326. Small Group Discussion Methods. (3) II. Basic concepts of small-group decision making. Projects emphasize participation in and analysis of communication in the small group. Pr.: COMM 105 or COMM 106. 

COMM 399. Honors Seminar Small Group Communication. (3) II. Open only to qualified students in the arts and sciences honors program.

COMM 470. Rhetoric of Community Building. (3) II. An examination of the symbolic processes of community building. Specifically, the study of the role language plays in sustaining the viability of rural community.

COMM 526. Persuasion. (3) II. The study of communication as persuasion; examination of contemporary approaches to persuasion.

COMM 535. Communication and Leadership. (3) In alternate years. A study of the ways leadership in differing contexts is designed and exercised through communication.  Constructs examined may include credibility, charisma, vision, power, myth, and public memory. Pr.: COMM 105 or COMM 106.

DAS 100. Freshman Seminar. (3) I. An introduction to the intellectual and cultural life of the university.

DAS 300. The Great Conversation: Primary Texts Certificate Core Course. (3) I. An interdisciplinary, team taught course, required for students enrolled in the Certificate in the Study of Arts and Sciences Through Primary Texts.  This course can be taken by students not in the certificate, and for Honors credit.

DAS 333.Origins. (3) An interdisciplinary general education course examining how scholars in the sciences and humanities approach knowledge about the university, the planet earth, and life itself. How did the university begin?  How did life begin and how does it evolve? How has the planet changed throughout its history?  How were answers to these questions discovered? How do we construct narratives about these events, and how do those texts reveal our assumptions and values? .

DAS 450. Honors Colloquium. (3) An interdisciplinary colloquium in which topics vary by semester. Consistently incorporates perspectives from more than one discipline and area among the arts, humanities, social sciences, and sciences. Pr.: Membership in the honors program; one honors course in addition to introduction to the honors program in Arts and Sciences. 

DAS 582. Natural Resources/ Environ. Science Project. (3) I, II. A comprehensive project in NRES. Requires integration of information and understanding acquired in NRES secondary major courses. Students must prepare and present written and oral reports. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: All writing and oral communications courses required for major. Pr. or conc.: 15 hours of approved courses in NRES secondary major. Cross-listed with GENAG 582 and DEN 582.

ECON 110. Principles of Macroeconomics. (3) I, II, S. Basic facts, principles, and problems of economics; determination of the level of employment, output, and the price level; the monetary and banking system; problems and policies of economic instability, inflation, and growth; principles of economic development; other economic systems. Pr.: Probability of a grade of C or higher (PROB >= C) of at least 40 percent according to the economics component of the ACT Student Profile, a score of 18 or higher on the Math Placement Exam, or a grade of B or higher in MATH 010.

ECON 120. Principles of Microeconomics. (3) I, II, S. Basic facts, principles, and problems of economics including study of the determination of prices; the determination of wages, rent, interest, and profit; theory of the firm; monopoly and government regulation; international economic relations. Pr.: Probability of a grade of C or higher (PROB >= C) of at least 40 percent according to the economics component of the ACT Student Profile, a score of 18 or higher on the Math Placement Exam, or a grade of B or higher in MATH 010.

ECON 399. Honors Seminar in Economics. (3). For sophomores in honors program--scheduled irregularly. Readings and discussions. Open to students in the honors program not majoring in economics.

ECON 505. South Asian Civilizations. (3) I, in even years. Interdisciplinary survey on the development of civilization in India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan, and Afghanistan, including geography, philosophy, social, economic, political institutions, and historical movements. Pr.: 3 hours of social science or junior standing. Same as ANTH 505, GEOG 505, HIST 505, POLSCI 505, SOCIO 505.

ECON 507. The Japanese Economy. (3) II. Analyzes Japan's growth, productivity change, income distribution, government policies, agriculture, industrial structure, labor relations, education and technology, and international trade and finance. Emphases will be on U.S. & Japanese competition and comparisons. Pr.: ECON 110.

ECON 523. Human Resource Economics. (3) II. An introduction to the economic forces influencing wage and employment determination, income differentials, unemployment, and the production and acquisition of human capital. Emphasis on public policy, labor unions, and other relevant institutions. Pr.: ECON 120. May not be counted toward economics major.

ECON 524. Sports Economics.  (3)  An economic analysis of professional and amateur sports.  Pay determination of professional athletes, monopsony power of owners, discrimination, the importance of leagues, competitive balance, antitrust issues, collective  bargaining, the financing of sports, stadiums, and current economic issues in sports.  Pr.: ECON 120. May not be counted toward economics major.

ECON 527. Environmental Economics. (3) II. Economics of environmental market failure and the efficient use of exhaustible and renewable resources. Topics include the application of markets and government policies to greenhouse warming, air and water pollution, and recycling. Pr.: ECON 120.

ECON 536. Comparative Economics. (3) II. The transition by Russia, Ukraine, Eastern and Central Europe, and Central Asia to market economics; economic reform in China, India, and other countries; and Marxian critiques of capitalism. Pr.: ECON 110 or 120.

ECON 555.  Urban and Regional Economics. (3) I. An examination of the determinants of the economic performance of urban and regional economies, including theory, problems, and policy. Pr.: ECON 120.

ECON 682. Development Economics. (3) I, II. Factors influencing the economic modernization of the less-developed countries. Emphasis on capital formation, investment allocation, structural transformation, population growth, development planning, and the international economics of development. Pr.: ECON 110.

ENGL 220. Fiction into Film. (2) I, II, S. Critical analysis of literary texts and their film adaptations. 

ENGL 230. Classical Cultures. (3) I, II, S. Ancient Greek and Roman cultures. As do all courses in this sequence (ENGL 231-234), course examines Western culture through literature, philosophy, religion, art, and music.  The four courses may be taken individually and in any order.

ENGL 231. Medieval and Renaissance. (3) I, II, S. Middle Ages to mid 1600s.  As do all courses in this sequence (ENGL 231-234), course examines Western culture through literature, philosophy, religion, art, and music.  The four courses may be taken individually and in any order.

ENGL 233. Reformation to Enlightenment. (3) I, II, S.  Beginnings of Protestantism through the 18th century.  As do all courses in this sequence (ENGL 230-234), course examines Western culture through literature, philosophy, religion, art, and music. The four courses may be taken individually and in any order.

ENGL 234. Modern. (3) I, II, S.  19th century to the present. As do all courses in this sequence (ENGL 230-234), course examines Western culture through literature, philosophy, religion, art, and music. The four courses may be taken individually and in any order.

ENGL 260. British Literature.  (3) I,II. Selected writers from various periods of British literary history. Designed for students not majoring/minoring in English.

ENGL 270. American Literature. (3) I, II, S. Selected writers from various periods in American literary history. Designed for students not majoring/minoring in English.

ENGL 285. Introduction to American Ethnic Literatures.  (3) I, II. Study of ethnic and multic8ultural literatures of the United States, such as African American, Asian American, Latina/o, Jewish, and Native American.  May offer cross-cultural comparisons of different ethnic traditions or may focus on a single ethnic tradition.

ENGL 287. Great Books. (3) I, II. Introduction to world classics from past to present.

ENGL 297. Honors Introduction to the Humanities I. (3) I. Study of selected major works of history, literature, and philosophy of central importance in the Western cultural tradition. Emphasis on classroom discussion and writing interpretive essays. Limited to entering freshmen. Pr.: Consent of instructor. Same as HIST 297, MLANG 297, PHILO 297.

ENGL 298. Honors Introduction to the Humanities II. (3) II. Continuation of ENGL 297. Pr.: ENGL 297 or consent of instructor. Same as HIST 298, MLANG 298, PHILO 298.

ENGL 315. Cultural Studies. (3) I, II, S. This course introduces the theories and methods of cultural studies through practical application to particular topics in culture and/or literature. An introductory class that addresses such issues as gender and sexuality, power relations among social groups, the construction, communication, and preservation of knowledge. The course typically features theoretical cultural studies material and a variety of media, including traditional and nontraditional literature, film, comics, television, the Internet, and other popular culture platforms.

ENGL 330. Fiction. (3) I, II, S. Fiction selected from various periods and cultures. Concern for form and critical analysis.

ENGL 335. Film. (3) I, II, S. Study of film as genre from historical beginnings through classic Hollywood to contemporary cinema. Emphasis on form and critical analysis.

ENGL 340. Poetry. (3) I, II, S. Close reading of poems and analysis of poetic genres, with emphasis on modern poetry.

ENGL 345. Drama. (3) I, II, S. Study of drama from classical times to the present.

ENGL 355. Literature for Children. (3) I, II, S. Survey emphasizing the reading and evaluating of books for children.  Required for certification in elementary education. Pr.: Sophomore standing.

ENGL 385. Selected American Ethnic Literatures.  (3) I, II. Studies in ethnic and multicultural literatures of the United States, such as African American, Asian American, Latina/o, Jewish, and Native American. May offer cross-cultural comparisons of different ethnic traditions or may focus on one tradition. Repeatable once with change of topic.

ENGL 386. African American Literatures. (3) I, II. Study of African American literatures. Will apply to the diversity overlay for English majors.  Repeatable once with change of topic.

ENGL 387. American Indian Literatures. (3) I, II. Study of American Indian literatures. Will apply to the diversity overlay for English majors.  Repeatable once with change of topic.

ENGL 388. Asian American Literatures. (3) I, II. Study of Asian American literatures. Will apply to the diversity overlay for English majors. Repeatable once with change of topic.

ENGL 389. Latina/o Literatures. (3) I, II. Study of Latina/o literatures. Will apply to the diversity overlay for English majors. Repeatable once with change of topic.

ENGL 390. Fable and Fantasy. (3) I, II. Study of modern works in the fabulous or fantastic modes in relation to the traditions underlying them. Pr.: ENGL 100 or 110.

ENGL 399. Honors Seminar in English. (1-3) Readings and colloquia in selected masterpieces. Pr.: Honors students only.

ENGL 420. Topics in Film. (3) Selected studies in film analysis. Repeatable once with change of topic. Pr: ENGL 125 or 200.

ENGL 440. Themes in Literature. (3) I, II, S. Explores the literary treatment of important and recurring themes. Repeatable once with change of topic. Pr.: ENGL 125 or 200.

ENGL 445. Literary Kinds. (3) I, II. Examines the characteristics, the growth and development, or the uses of specified literary genres. Repeatable once with change of topic. Pr.: ENGL 125 or 200.

ENGL 450. Literature and Society. (1-3) I, II (Manhattan campus); II (Salina campus). Literature in relation to social and cultural patterns and influences. Repeatable once. Pr.: ENGL 125 or 200.

ENGL 470. The Bible. (3) I, II, S. Literature, history, and cultural backgrounds of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) and/or the New Testament and early Christianity. Repeatable once with change of topic. Pr.: ENGL 125 or 200.

ENGL 525. Women in Literature. (3) I, II. Study of literary works by or about women. Repeatable once with change of topic. Pr: ENGL 125 or 200.


ENGL 545. Literature for Adolescents. (3) I, II. Selecting, reading, and evaluating books for adolescents. Required for those seeking middle school and high school certification in English. Pr.: ENGL 125 or 200.

ENGL 580. Selected World Literature. (3) I, II.  Addresses writing by authors whose native origins lie outside Europe or the United States. Content may vary with instructor. May examine literature from several countries and regions, concentrate upon literature for one country or region, or focus on a topic which transcends national or regional boundaries. Works are written in or translated into English.

FREN 111. French I. (5) Introduction to the structure of modern French, emphasizing the spoken language with practice in the language laboratory.

FREN 112. French II. (5) Continuation of French I, completion of basic presentation of the structure of French. Emphasis on spoken language, use of language lab. Pr.: FREN 111 or equiv.

FREN 113. Beginning Accelerated French.  (5) Course covering material from French 1 and 2 in one semester.  Listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  Includes one hour lab per week in language laboratory or other language opportunities outside of class time.  For students with one or two years of previous French instruction or advanced learners of other languages who desire a faster pace.

FREN 211. French III. (5) Continuation of French II, presentation of more advanced elements of the French language. Emphasis on spoken language, use of the language lab. Pr.: FREN 112 or equiv.

FREN 213. French IV. (4) Continuation of French III, presentation of more advanced elements of the French language. Emphasis on spoken language, use of the language lab. Pr.: FREN 211 or equiv.

FREN 514. Contemporary France. (3) Introduction to French culture with special emphasis on social and historical developments since World War II. Pr.: FREN 213 or equiv.

FREN 515. French and Francophone Culture. (3) A survey of French and Francophone culture from the Middle Ages to the present, including but not limited to, developments in art and architecture, music, and literature. Pr: FREN 213 or equivalent.

FREN 516. Readings in French. (3) Practice in reading a variety of literary, journalistic, and specialized texts from France and Francophone countries. Pr.: FREN 213 or equiv.

FREN 517. Commercial French. (3) Advanced grammar necessary for adequate oral and written expression in international business and diplomatic situations, including specialized terminology, conversation and discussion, and translation. Pr.: FREN 213 or equiv.

FREN 520. Introduction to French Literature I. (3) The reading and discussion of major works of French literature from the Middle Ages to the end of the eighteenth century. Pr.: FREN 516 or equiv.

FREN 521. Introduction to French Literature II. (3) The reading and discussion of major works of French literature from the early nineteenth century to the present. Pr.: FREN 16l or equiv.

GEOG 100. World Regional Geography. (3) I, II. Introduction to geography structured on a framework of major world regions and countries. With the regional approach is an explicit discussion of the essential concepts of certain systematic specialties, such as political, social, economic, and urban geography.

GEOG 200. Human Geography. (3) I. A geographical assessment of the way human activities shape landscapes throughout the world. The course is especially appropriate for students interested in the social and behavioral sciences.

GEOG 201. Human Geography (Honors). (3) I Spatial aspects of human organization and behavior are examined through selected concepts in modern geography. The course is especially appropriate for students interested in the social and behavioral sciences.

GEOG 221. Environmental Geography I. (4) I, II. A basic physical geography course emphasizing the atmosphere, weather, climate, and the biosphere. Includes human modification of atmospheric conditions, climate change, severe storms, and the association between global climate and plant distributions. Introduces map use, including isopleths and weather maps. Three hours lec. and one two-hour lab a week.

GEOG 300. Geography of Tourism. (3) II. The geography of tourism is concerned with the structure, form, use, and conservation of the landscape as well as with such spatial conditions as the location of tourist areas and the movements of people from place to place. This course addresses such concepts as the economic, environmental, social, and cultural impacts of tourism as well as examining the tourist geography of each of the world's regions, focusing on the major tourist areas.

GEOG 302. Cartography and Thematic Mapping. (3) I. Introduction to cartographic history, theory and principles, thematic map design, symbolization, map perception, color theory, typography, and digital cartographic research. Laboratory work will familiarize students with the latest cartographic software that will be used to produce a series of thematic maps. The course will consist of two hours of lecture and two hours of lab per week. Pr.: STAT 325 (or equiv.).

GEOG 310. Geography of Kansas. (3) I. Perceptions of Kansas, and a regional analysis of the state including discussion of climate, landforms, soil, water, and minerals as well as patterns of settlement, population, agriculture, industry, transportation, and urban development.

GEOG 321. Environmental Geography II. (4) I, II. A basic physical geography course emphasizing the atmosphere, weather, climate, and the biosphere.  Includes human modification of atmospheric conditions, climate change, severe storms, and the association between global climate and plant distributions. Introduces map use, including isopleth and weather maps. Three hours lec. and one two-hour lab per week. Pr.: GEOG 221.

GEOG 340. Geography of Natural Resources. (3) I. The distribution, significance, and environmental consequences of world agriculture, fishing, forestry, and mining, emphasizing the principles which account for the spatial variation in the extraction and consumption of natural resources.

GEOG 350. Earth System Geography. (4) S A basic physical geography course emphasizing the geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere, including the processes, patterns, and physical science background required to understand related issues such as natural hazards and human modification of earth systems.

GEOG 399. Honors Seminar in Geography. (2-3) Selected topics. Open to non-majors in the honors program.

GEOG 500. Geography of the United States. (3) I, in odd years. A regional analysis of the United States with special attention to the historical, political, economic, and social factors which contribute to a real differentiation within the area.

GEOG 505. South Asian Civilizations. (3) I, in even years. Interdisciplinary survey on the development of civilization in India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan, and Afghanistan, including geography, philosophy, social, economic, political institutions, and historical movements. Pr.: 3 hours of social science or junior standing. Same as ANTH 505, ECON 505, HIST 505, POLSCI 505, SOCIO 505.

GEOG 508. Geographic Information Systems I.  (3) II. Examination of the major concepts, theories, and operations in geographic information systems (GIS). Topics include: the nature of geo-referenced data, data acquisition, and spatial database management, coordinate systems and maps, data structure, and the basic GIS operations that are available for spatial analysis. The course will consist of two hours of lecture and two hours of lab a week. Pr.: GEOG 302 or instructor permission.

GEOG 510.  Geography of the American West.  (3) II, in even years.  A broad survey of the geography of the American West with a focus on the distinctive human and environmental characteristics of the region.  Historical, cultural, ethnic, resource, land use, and physical landscape patterns are examined through lectures, readings, videos, and discussions.  Pr.:  A previous course in geography and sophomore standing.

GEOG 535. Fundamentals of Climatology. (3) II. An examination of Climatology on global, regional, and local scales, with emphasis on the physical processes and environmental factors that influence and control climate. Climatic change and its impact on human activities are explored. Pr.: GEOG 321.

GEOG 600.  Mountain Geography.  (3) I, in even years.  A broad survey of the human and physical geography of mountains. The course utilizes lectures, discussion, videos, and photographs to examine the human-environment interactions, cultural symbolism and sacredness, recreation and tourism, and sustainable development of mountain landscapes.  The regional focus is primarily on the American West, but other mountains throughout the world will also be studied.  Pr.: A previous course in geography and junior standing.

GEOG 620. Mexico, Central America, and Caribbean. (3) A broad survey of the physical and human patterns of the Mexican, Central American, and Caribbean culture area, past and present, with emphasis on the changing landscape features in the successive patterns of human occupancy and globalization.

GEOG 622. Geography of South America.  (3) A broad survey of the physical and human patterns of the South American culture area, past and present, with emphasis on the changing landscape features in the successive patterns of human occupancy and globalization.

GEOG 650. Geography of Former Soviet Lands. (3) II, in odd years. Physical limitations, resource potentials, economic capabilities, and political and nationality issues, with particular emphasis on agriculture, manufacturing, urbanization, cultural diversity, and regional development. Pr.: Six hours of social science.

GEOL 100. Earth in Action. (3) II (Manhattan Campus); I, II (Salina Campus). The earth's physical, structural, and dynamic features; the most common minerals and rocks; processes affecting the earth. Three hours rec. a week.

GEOL 102. Earth Through Time. (3) I, II. An introduction to the immensity of geologic time and a review of the history of the earth and the life upon it. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: GEOL 100.

GEOL 103. Geology Laboratory. (1) I, II, S (Manhattan Campus); I, II (Salina Campus). Field and laboratory investigation of minerals, rocks, and fossils; use of maps; environmental studies, erosion, transportation, sedimentation. Two hours lab a week. Pr.: GEOL 100, 102, 105, or 125 or conc. enrollment.

GEOL 105. Oceanography. (3) I, II, S. The oceans: their boundaries, contents, and processes. Three hours rec. a week.

GEOL 115. Environmental Geology. (3) I. Major reservoirs of Earth and the hydrologic cycle; minerals and rocks on the surface and in subsurface environments; minerals and rock-water interactions; compositional variations of waters; surface and ground water pollutions; atmospheric pollutions; waste disposal problems.

GEOL 125. Natural Disasters. (3) I, II. Discussion of geological phenomena such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, and floods, with particular emphasis on their causes, effects, and significance as hazards. Three hours rec. a week.

GEOL 399. Honors Seminar in Geology. (1-3) I, II. Selected topics. Open to non-majors in the honors program.

GEOL 506. Environmental Studies. (2) I, II, S. Physical and chemical qualities of natural environments and health from a geologic perspective- detection and prediction of environmental changes, identification of sources of pollutants and their movements in soils, rocks, and waters. Pr.: GEOL 100.

GEOL 540. Ice Ages and Environmental Change. (3) I. Studies of the recent geologic past, especially of the last major ice age to the present. Causes of glaciation and climatic change, ways of reconstructing past geologic environmental and geologic environments changes during the time when human civilization developed, including recent historic time. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: GEOL 100 or GEOG 221.

GRMN 121. German I. (5) Introduction to the structure of modern German. Practice of the spoken language with additional experience in the language lab.

GRMN 122. German II. (5) Continuation to the introduction of modern German. Practice of the spoken language, additional experience in reading and with a variety of additional media. Pr.: GRMN 121 or equiv.

GRMN 221. German III. (5) Conclusion of the introduction to modern German. Continued practice of the spoken language, reading and additional experience with a range of audio and visual media. Pr.: GRMN 122 or equiv.

GRMN 223. German IV. (4) Review of select points of German language structure accompanied by practice in conversation, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as additional experience with audio and visual media. Pr.: GRMN 221 or equiv.

GRMN 503. German Literature in Translation. (3) Selected readings in English from such major German authors as Thomas Mann, Brecht, Hesse, Grass, and Kafka.

GRMN 510. German Film. (3) In English.  Addresses various topics within a German historical-cultural context.  Students will consider what makes cinema a distinct form of artistic expression.  May be taken for major credit if assignments and discussion are completed in German. Normally taken concurrently with German IV.

GRMN 515. Topics in German Cultural Studies.  (3) In English.  Specific course content will vary by semester and instructor. May be taken for German major credit.

HIST 297. Honors Introduction to the Humanities I. (3) I. Study of selected major works of history, literature, and philosophy which have been of central importance in the Western cultural tradition. Considerable emphasis is placed on classroom discussion and writing interpretive essays. Limited to entering freshmen students. Pr.: Consent of instructor. Same as ENGL 297, MLANG 297, PHILO 297.

HIST 298. Honors Introduction to the Humanities II. (3) II. Continuation of HIST 297. Pr.: HIST 297 or consent of instructor. Same as ENGL 298, MLANG 298, PHILO 298.

HIST 330. History of East Asian Civilizations. (3) II. East Asia history from earliest times to the present. Social structures, beliefs and values during key periods of Chinese and Japanese history. Major developments in religion, philosophy, literature and the arts.

HIST 399. Honors Seminar in History. (3) Selected topics in history. May be repeated once for credit. Pr.: Membership in honors program or consent of instructor.

HIST 505. South Asian Civilizations. (3) I, in even years. Interdisciplinary survey of the development of civilization in India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan, and Afghanistan, including geography, philosophy, social, economic, political institutions, and historical movements. Pr.: 3 hours of social science or junior standing. Same as ANTH 505, ECON 505, GEOG 505, POLSCI 505, SOCIO 505.

HIST 511. Environmental History. (3) I, in alternate years. An introduction to environmental history as an academic specialization through selected reading and topical lectures. The course emphasizes the study of people in nature through time; it stresses people's response to environmental change through three broadly defined periods: pre-industrial, modern industrial, and contemporary. Pr.: Sophomore standing.

HIST 520. Death and Dying in History. (3) I, II, in alternate years. Examines European and American attitudes toward death and dying in various historical periods. Topics include: death and dying in the European Middle Ages and in nineteenth and twentieth century America, the impact of the Nazi Holocaust on modern opinions about death, suicide as a historical problem, the fear of cancer in modern times, and others. Pr.: Sophomore standing.

HIST 534. Social History of Medicine. (3) In alternate years. An exploration of the development of American social thought and practices regarding health care from colonial times to the present. The course stresses changing cultural attitudes toward disease as well as alterations in social practices and institutions related to healing. Special emphasis is given to the institutional development and professionalization of modern medicine. Pr.: Sophomore standing.

HIST 536. The American West. (3) I, in alternate years. Primary emphasis on the nineteenth century when Americans were rapidly spreading across the continent. Also examines the earlier developments of the frontier and considers the twentieth century role of the trans-Mississippi region. Pr.: Sophomore standing.

HIST 537. History of the Indians of North America. (3) In alternate years. A discussion of Indian-white relations from 1492 to the present. Special emphasis given to federal government policy and the cultural decline of the native people of North America. Also includes an examination of Indian reservations and urban Indians.

HIST 554. History of the South. (3) II, in alternate years. Topical analysis of important issues in Southern history. Compares the plantation myth of popular films with interpretations by important historians. Emphasis on plantation agriculture, slavery, race relations, class, and gender in the Old South. Post-Civil War topics include federal Reconstruction efforts, segregation, economic reform, and the modern Civil Rights movement. Pr.: Sophomore standing.

HIST 556. Bill of Rights in American History. (3) This course provides a topical survey of the American Bill of Rights from the colonial era to the present. It begins with the origins of American rights in England and colonial America. An analysis of the need for a Bill of Rights at the founding and Supreme Court interpretations in 1835 and during the Reconstruction era follow. The bulk of the course is concerned with the nationalization and expansion of the Bill of Rights in the twentieth century and its meaning in the everyday lives of American citizens.

HIST 570. Europe in the Seventeenth Century. (3) I, in alternate years. Surveys the economic, social, political and intellectual history of western Europe in the seventeenth century, a period marked by economic depression, international conflict, and domestic revolutions as well as by cultural achievement. Emphasizes the complex interaction among social groups; the rise of a European state system; the development of constitutional monarchy in England and absolute monarchy in France; and the change in values generated by the scientific revolution. Pr.: Sophomore standing.

HIST 577. European International Relations Since 1815. (3) II, in alternate years. The nature, evolution, and functions of the European diplomatic system from 1815 to the present. Focuses on the Vienna settlement, the Eastern Question, the Crimean War, Italian and German unification, origins of World War I, international developments between the two world wars, the cold war, and the post-cold war era. Includes analysis of major theorists.

HIST 583. History of France, 1400-1715. (3) In alternate years. France from the conclusion of the Hundred Years War to the death of Louis XIV. French economy, society, and royal administration, and the changes generated in these areas by significant events: the Reformation and the Wars of Religion; the rise of France to world power; peasant uprisings and constitutional crisis; and the reforms of Richelieu, Colbert, and Louis XIV. Trends in art, architecture, and philosophy. Pr.: Sophomore standing.

HIST 584. History of France since 1715. (3) In alternate years. France from the death of Louis XIV to the present. The impact of the French Revolution and the Napoleonic system on the agrarian economy and aristocratic society of the eighteenth century; the evolution of liberalism, socialism, and colonialism; the development of parliamentary democracy and the impact of the Industrial Revolution; the French response to the devastation of World War I, the humiliation of World War II, and the colonial wars of the De Gaulle era. Pr.: Sophomore standing.

HIST 591. The Russian Empire. (3) I, in alternate years. Imperial Russia from the earliest Slavic tribes through 1881, with emphasis on Russia's heritage as a multi-ethnic state and the phenomenon of Russia's Revolutional intellectuals.   Pr.: Sophomore standing.

KIN 220. Biobehavioral Bases of Physical Activity. (3) I, II. Current perspectives from the biological and behavioral domains of Kinesiology will be used to explore the significance of physical activity for optimal health. Topics include physiology of physical activity, social and behavioral epidemology of physical activity and health, control and biomechanics of human movement. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory experiences.

KIN 360. Anatomy and Physiology. (8) I, II.  Anatomy and Physiology of the organ systems of the human body.  Laboratory includes physiology experiments, study of anatomy from computer simulation, dissection demonstrations, X-rays, and slide work.  Pr.: BIOL 198 taken at K-State (with a C grade or better) or transfered introductory biology credit.  (Note: Five hours lec. and two three-hour lab sessions a week.)

KIN 399. Honors Seminar. (1-3) Selected topics in Kinesiology. Open to non-majors in the honors program. On sufficient demand.

MATH 399. Honors Seminar in Mathematics. (1-3) Pr.: Membership in honors program.

MC 110. Mass Communication in Society. (3) I, II, S. A historical, social, legal, economic, and technological study of mass communication and its role and impact in society. Open to majors and non-majors.

MC 112. Web Communication in Society. (3) I, II. History and social impact of the World Wide Web as a mass communication medium, with emphasis on applications in informatio0n dissemination, such as entertainment, advertising and public relations.  Open to majors and non-majors.  

MC 399. Honors Seminar in Mass Communications. (3) Pr.: Honors students only.

MLANG 297. Honors Introduction to the Humanities I. (3) Intersessions only. Study of selected major works of history, literature, and philosophy which have been of central importance in the Western cultural tradition. Considerable emphasis is placed on classroom discussion and writing interpretive essays. Limited to entering freshman students. Pr.: Consent of instructor. Same as ENGL 297, HIST 297, PHIL 297.

MLANG 298. Honors Introduction to the Humanities II. (3) I. Continuation of MLANG 297. Pr.: MLANG 297 or consent of instructor. Same as ENGL 298, HIST 298, PHIL 298.

MLANG 399. Honors Seminar in Modern Languages. (1-3) II. Reading and discussion of selected masterpieces of European literature in English translation. Open to non-language majors in the honors program.

MSCI 200. Self/Team Development. (V) II. Ethics-based military leadership skills that develop individual abilities and contribute to building effective teams. Oral presentations, advanced first aid, land navigation and basic military tactics. Two classroom hours; a required leadership lab; optional, but encouraged, participation in three one-hour physical fitness sessions. Participation in a weekend exercise.

MSCI 202. Individual/Team Military Tactics. (V) I. Introduction to individual and team aspects of military tactics in small unit operations. Safety assessments, movement techniques, military orders process, rifle marksmanship, rappelling. Two classroom hours; a required leadership lab; participation in three one-hour physical fitness sessions. Participation in a weekend exercise is optional, but highly encouraged.

MUSIC 100. Music Fundamentals. (3) I, II, S. Elementary instruction in the theory of music. Limited to non-music majors.

MUSIC 160. Music Listening Laboratory. (2) I, II, S. A basic introduction to music. Overview of Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Classic, Romantic, and Twentieth Century stylistic periods; elements of music (melody, rhythm, harmony, form, timbre); and instrument recognition. The focus of the class is on developing listening skills and learning to write brief papers using the new language that has been acquired. Performances are provided by university ensembles, faculty artists, and special guests. Limited to non-music majors.

MUSIC 170. History of Rock and Roll. (3) A study of Rock and Roll from its origins through today, focusing on the development of rock styles from its roots in blues, folk, country, and pop.  Expansion of listening experience through study of song forms, musical instruments of rock, and the socio-political significance of song lyrics.  Examinations, research paper required. 

MUSIC 245. Introduction to American Music. (3) II. An introduction to the functions of music in American society and the elements of music, including a survey of the development of various types and styles of music in America.

MUSIC 250. Introduction to Music. (3) I, II, S. Elements of music as represented in selected masterpieces of the standard concert repertory, designed to heighten the perception and the enjoyment of the listener who has limited musical knowledge. For non-music majors only.

MUSIC 310. History of Musical Instruments. (2) I, II. The development of musical instruments in each period of Western music. Pr.: MUSIC 160 or 250.

MUSIC 399. Honors Seminar. (3) II. For selected sophomores. 

MUSIC 420. History of Jazz. (3) I. Survey of jazz styles and personalities. For music majors and non-majors. Pr.: MUSIC 160, 250, or equiv. 

MUSIC 421. Salsa: Afro-Cuban Music of the Past and Present. (3) On sufficient demand. Appreciation, historical knowledge, mechanics, aesthetics, and cultural contexts of salsa. Pr.: MUSIC 225, 245, or 250.

MUSIC 424. Jazz in Kansas City and the Southwest. (2-3) II. The history and development of jazz styles in Kansas City and the southwestern United States, emphasizing the influence on styles of other geographic areas. Pr.: MUSIC 160.

PHILO 100. Introduction to Philosophical Problems. (3) I, II, S (Manhattan campus); II (Salina campus). An introduction to some of the main problems of philosophy, such as the nature of morality, knowledge, mind and body, political authority, and the existence of God.

PHILO 110. Introduction to Formal Logic. (3) I, II, S. Systematic study of deductive reasoning (and possibly inductive reasoning) using the techniques of modern logic.  Examines different types of valid inference, the logical structure of English sentences, and the validity of arguments generally. Involves the development and use of a symbolic system which models logical relations among sentences.

PHILO 115. Introduction to Philosophy of Religion. (3) I, II, S.  Arguments pertaining to the existence of God, the nature of religious experience, the problem of evil, the proper relation between reason and faith, and religious diversity.

PHILO 120. Introduction to Philosophy of Art. (3) I, II S. Philosophical problems concerning the concept of art, aesthetic value, patterns of reasoning in art appreciation and criticism and writing histories of art and artistic movements.

PHILO 125. Introduction to Philosophy of Science. (3) I, II, S. Examines the nature of science and how it differs from pseudo-sciences such as astrology, and raises questions about the nature of reality and social value of science.

PHILO 130. Introduction to Moral Philosophy. (3) I, II, S (Manhattan campus); II (Salina campus). Philosophical issues arising in and about morality, such as the nature of moral judgments, moral knowledge, moral justification, and the relation of morality to religion. Topics might be approached by a study of contemporary moral problems, by reading of classical philosophical texts, or by both methods.

PHILO 135. Introduction to Social and Political Philosophy. (3) I, II, S. Examines rival theories of justice and applies them to current debates about economic inequality, gender, race, and sexual orientation.  Combines some influential historical texts with contemporary philosophical literature on current political issues. 

PHILO 140. Introduction to Philosophy of Mind. (3) I, II. Philosophical problems concerning the nature of human beings, including the relation between mind and body, the existence of the soul, the nature of consciousness, the possibility of artificial intelligence, human freedom and personal identity. 

PHILO 145. Historical Introduction to Philosophy. (3) I, II. Introduction to philosophy through the study of major thinkers in the history of philosophy, such as Plato, Descartes, Hume.  Topics may include the immortality of the soul, the existence of God, skepticism, reasons for being moral. 

PHILO 297. Honors Introduction to the Humanities I. (3) I. Study of selected major works of history, literature, and philosophy which have been of central importance in the Western cultural tradition. Considerable emphasis is placed on classroom discussion and writing interpretive essays. For students in an honors program. Pr.: Consent of instructor. Same as ENGL 297, HIST 297, MLANG 297.

PHILO 298. Honors Introduction to the Humanities II. (3) II. Continuation of PHILO 297. Pr.: PHILO 297 or consent of instructor. Same as ENGL 298, HIST 298, MLANG 298.

PHILO 365. Medical Ethics. (3) II. Selected moral issues which confront the medical professional, including experimentation on human subjects, informed consent, abortion, euthanasia, conflict of interest, and confidentiality.

PHILO 380. Philosophy and Race.  (3) I. The concept of race and racial identity, and contemporary controversies about the nature of racism and social justice, examined through fiction, movies, and readings in Biology, Anthropology, History, and Philosophy.

PHILO 390. Business Ethics. (3) I or II (Manhattan campus).  An examination of the principles of ethics as applied to situations and practices in modern American business.

PHILO 399. Honors Seminar in Philosophy. (3) I.

PHYS 101. The Physical World I. (3) I, II, S (Manhattan campus); S (Salina campus). The courses The Physical World I and II are designed to present an overview of the physical sciences for students who have little or no previous physical science. The Physical World I is principally physics and atomic theory. The observations and phenomena are simple and basic. Three hours lec. a week. Not available for credit to students who have credit in PHYS 106.

PHYS 106. Concepts of Physics. (4) I. An introductory course in physics which emphasizes the topics of physics normally presented to elementary school children. A qualitative approach with integrated laboratory, this course is recommended for students preparing for careers as elementary school teachers. Not available for credit to students who have completed PHYS 101.

PHYS 191. Descriptive Astronomy. (3) II. A qualitative study of the sun and planets, stars and galaxies; a survey of what is known about the universe and how it is known.

PHYS 399. Physics Honors Seminar. (1-3) I. Discussions of topics of current interest in physics. Students must be enrolled in the arts and sciences honors program or have permission of the instructor.

PHYS 451. Principles of Contemporary Physics. (3) II. A nonmathematical introduction to twentieth century physics: relativity, quantum mechanics, the physics of solids, and fundamental particles. Not open to physics majors. Credit is not granted for both PHYS 451 and PHYS 452. Pr.: PHYS 101 or equiv.

PHYS 452. Contemporary Physics: Problems and Principles. (4) II. An introduction to twentieth century physics; relativity, quantum mechanics, the physics of solids and fundamental particles. The lectures are in common with PHYS 451. Three hours lec. and one hour rec. each week. The laboratory will include the quantitative aspects of the subject matter. Not open to physics majors. Credit is not granted for both PHYS 451 and PHYS 452. Pr.: One year of college physics (PHYS 113 and 114 or equiv.), college algebra, and trigonometry. 

POLSC 110. Introduction to Political Science. (3) I, II, S by Telenet. Introduction to politics, public policy, and governmental processes from a political science perspective, studying political power, political thought, public opinion, groups, parties, institutions, public law, careers in politics, and related topics.

POLSC 301. Introduction to Political Thought.  (3) An introduction to the major themes and leading writers in political philosophy and a discussion of their application to modern politics. This course emphasizes learning how to read and appreciate classic texts. Pr.: Sophomore standing.

POLSC 325. United States Politics. (3) The national government with emphasis on constitutional principles, basic structure, functions, and the political process.

POLSC 326. United States Politics, Honors. (4) I, II, S. The national government with emphasis on constitutional principles, basic structure, functions, and the political process. Pr: Membership in an honors program.

POLSC 333. World Politics. (3) II. Introduction to the study of politics among nations-states and other world actors, including a survey of major contemporary problems of world politics and focusing on the pursuit of power, order, wealth, and safe environment.

POLSC 344. Introduction to Comparative Politics. (3) I, II. Comparative analysis of politics in both ''developed'' and ''developing'' countries. Though some attention will be given to abstract and theoretical concepts, the emphasis will be on the actual political process in the countries selected for study.

POLSC 399. Honors Seminar in Political Science. (1-3) I.

POLSC 505. South Asian Civilizations. (3)I, in even years. Interdisciplinary survey on the development of civilization in India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan, and Afghanistan, including geography, philosophy, social, economic, political institutions, and historical movements. Pr.: 3 hours of social science or junior standing. Same as ECON 505, GEOG 505, HIST 505, SOCIO 505, ANTH 505.

PSYCH 110. General Psychology. (3) I, II, S. An introductory survey of the general content areas of psychology, including methods, data, and principles.

PSYCH 115. General Psychology (Honors). (4) II. An introductory survey of the general content areas of psychology, including methods, data, and principles.

PSYCH 202. Drugs and Behavior. (3) I, II. Effects of drugs on human performance, cognition, and physiological processes will be discussed and the empirical evidence surveyed and critically evaluated in relation to both use and abuse of drugs in society. Pr.: PSYCH 110.

PSYCH 280. Psychology of Childhood and Adolescence. (3) I, II. Survey of behavioral development from birth through adolescence. Pr.: PSYCH 110. 

PSYCH 370. Brain and Behavior. (3) I, II, S. A general overview of human brain function using case studies as a primary means for understanding the relationship between behavior and brain mechanisms. Pr.: PSYCH 110.

PSYCH 399. Honors Seminar in Psychology. (3) I, II. Selected topics. Open to non-majors in the honors program.

SOCIO 211. Introduction to Sociology. (3) I, II, S (Manhattan campus); I, II (Salina campus). Development, structure, and functioning of human groups; social and cultural patterns; and the principal social processes.

SOCIO 214. Introduction to Sociology, Honors. (4) I, II. Development, structure, and functioning of human groups; societal and cultural patterns; the nature of sociological inquiry. Lecture, discussion, and independent study.

SOCIO 363. Global Problems. (3)  Analysis of globalization and contemporary social problems around the world. Emphasis on non-Western, low-income countries.  Examination of food and hunger, global warming, debt crisis, democratization, ethnic conflict, and structures of economic and political inequality.

SOCIO 399. Honors Seminar in Sociology. (1-3) II. Readings and discussion of selected topics. Open to non-majors in the honors program.

SOCIO 470. The Criminal Justice System and Family Violence. (3) II. This course critically examines the incidence and prevalence of family violence in society, emphasizing how the criminal justice system responds to this social problem.

SOCIO 505. South Asian Civilizations. (3) I, in even years. Interdisciplinary survey on the development of civilization in India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan, and Afghanistan, including geography, philosophy, social, economic, political institutions, and historical movements. Pr.: 3 hours of social science or junior standing. Same as ECON 505, GEOG 505, HIST 505, POLSCI 505, ANTH 505.

SOCIO 510. Social Welfare as a Social Institution. (3) I, II. The development and present status of social welfare in meeting changing human needs and the requirements in other parts of our social system; the analysis of present-day philosophy and functions of social welfare. Same as SOCWK 510. Pr.: SOCIO 211.

SOCIO 533. Rural Society. (3) I. A survey of U.S. rural society, including change in agricultural structure, rural demographic shifts, growth of the rural service sector, rural class structure, decline and transformation of rural communities, and linkages to urban society. Examination of selected rural institutions such as education and religion. Pr.: SOCIO 211 or consent of instructor.

SOCIO 562. Social Construction of Serial Murder.  (3) The course critically examines the social construction of serial murder as a phenomenon that has long existed but only recently has been polarized as a concern of the criminal justice system and the public in general. The objective of the course is to synthesize historical and social scientific analysis of serial murder, assess public and media debates centered on both offenders and victims, and evaluate the portrayal of serial murder in contemporary literature and film.

SOCIO 665. Women and Crime. (3) I. Nature and extent of criminal offending among women and women offenders' interactions with legal and criminal justice systems; women's victimization, including rape and intimate violence; women workers in the criminal justice system, specifically in law, policing, and prison work. Pr.: SOCIO 561 or 545 or other Women's Studies courses at the 500-level or above.

SOCIO 670. Diversity and Social Interaction in the Workplace.  (3) Intersession. Examines changes in the world of work; examines various contexts of work, such as business, the professions, education, and home; analyzes the social organization of work, both in terms of formal arrangements, such as authority and hierarchy, and in terms of informal structure, such as gender, race, class, and other categories of social difference; provides hands-on experience in dealing with interpersonal relations, management styles, communication, diversity issues, and conflict and stress management. Pr.: 6 hours of social science.

SOCWK 510. Social Welfare. (3) I, II. The development and present status of social welfare in meeting changing human needs and the requirements in other parts of our social system; the analysis of present-day philosophy and the functions of social welfare. Same as SOCIO 510. Pr.: One course in each of the following areas: Sociology, Economics, and Political Science.

SOCWK 580. Women's Perspectives on Peace and War. (2-3) Intersession only. This course will consider the issue of the participation of women in opposition to war and weapons of war and advocacy for peaceful resolution of conflict. Readings and discussions will focus on four areas: (1) historical and contemporary women's peace movements; (2) the influence of a male-dominated societal structure on the use of violence and militarism as a means of resolving conflict; (3) the question of whether or not women are naturally more inclined to be peaceful; and (4) the activities, thoughts, and works of individual women in their quest for peace, within themselves, and in the world.

SPAN 161. Spanish I. (5) I (Salina campus). Introduction to Spanish language and Hispanic culture for students with no previous Spanish experience. Listening, speaking, reading and writing. Includes 1 hour per week in language laboratory or other language opportunities outside of class time. Heritage speakers of Spanish see SPAN 365.

SPAN 162. Spanish II. (5) II (Salina campus). Continuation of Spanish I, devoted to Spanish language and Hispanic culture. Listening, speaking, reading and writing. Includes 1 hours per week in language laboratory or other language opportunities outside of class time. For students with fewer than two years of high school Spanish. Heritage speakers of Spanish see SPAN 365. Pr.: SPAN 161 or equiv.

SPAN 165. Accelerated Beginning Spanish. (5) Course covering material from Spanish 1 and 2 in one semester.  Listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  Includes one hour per week in language laboratory or other language opportunities outside of class time.  For students with one or two years of previous Spanish instruction or advanced learners of other languages who desire a faster pace.  Not open to heritage speakers of Spanish see SPAN 365.

SPAN 261. Spanish III. (5) Continuation of Spanish sequence, devoted to Spanish language and Hispanic culture.  Listening, speaking, reading, writing, and review of language structures. Includes one hour per week in language laboratory or other language opportunities outside of class time. Heritage speakers of Spanish see SPAN 365.  Pr.: SPAN 162 or 165 or equiv.

SPAN 361. Spanish IV. (4) Culmination of intermediate Spanish sequence and bridge to upper-level classes. Application of listening, speaking, reading, writing skills to cultural and literary topics. Includes one hour per week of language opportunities outside of class time. Heritage speakers of Spanish see SPAN 365.  Pr.: SPAN 261 or equiv.

STAT 100. Statistical Literacy in the Age of Information. (3)This course is intended for majors in non-quantitative fields. Focus will be on the development of an awareness of statistics at the conceptual and interpretative level, in the context of everyday life. Data awareness and quality, sampling, scientific investigation, decision making, and the study of relationships are included. Emphasis will be on the development of critical thinking through in-class experiments and activities, discussions, analyses of real data sets, written reports, and collaborative learning. Computing activities will be included where appropriate; no previous computing experience required. Pr.: MATH 100. Cannot be taken for credit if credit has been received for any other statistics course.

STAT 325. Introduction to Statistics. (3) I, II (Manhattan campus); I, II, S (Salina campus) A project-oriented first course in probability and statistics with emphasis on computer analysis of data.  Examples selected primarily from social sciences, natural sciences, education and popular culture.  Descriptive statistics, probability, sampling, tests of hypothesis and confidence intervals for means and proportions, design and analysis of simple comparative studies, chi-square tests for association, correlation and linear regression. Cannot be taken for credit if credit has been received for STAT 340 or STAT 350. This course replaces both STAT 320 Elements of Statistics and STAT 330 Elementary Statistics for Social Sciences, effective Spring 2007.

STAT 340. Biometrics I. (3) I, II, S. A basic first course in probability and statistics with textbook, examples, and problems aimed toward the biological sciences. Frequency distributions, averages, measures of variation, probability, confidence intervals; tests of significance appropriate to binomial, multinomial, Poisson, and normal sampling; simple regression and correlation. Cannot be taken for credit if credit has been received for STAT 320, 330, or 350. Pr.: MATH 100.

STAT 350. Business and Economic Statistics I. (3) II. A basic first course in probability and statistics with textbook, examples, and problems pointed toward business administration and economics. Frequency distributions, averages, index numbers, time series, measures of variation, probability, confidence intervals, tests of significance appropriate to binomial, multinomial, Poisson, and normal sampling; simple regression and correlation. Pr.: MATH 100. Cannot be taken for credit if credit has been received for STAT 325, or 340.

STAT 399. Honors Seminar in Statistics. (3) I, II, S.  Selected topics. May be used to satisfy quantitative requirements for B.S. degree. Open only to students in the honors program.

THTRE 261. Fundamentals of Acting. (3) Theory and practice of fundamental skills and techniques of acting. Major emphasis is on freeing and training the individual's imagination, intellect, body, and voice through designed exercise and performed scenes. Three hours rec. per week.

THTRE 270. Introduction to Theatre. (3) A comprehensive introduction to theatre: basic elements of theater and theater production, theater history, dramatic literature, multicultural theater traditions and perspectives, and the theatre experience.

THTRE 361. Intermediate Acting. (3) Intersession only.  Emphasis upon expanding the actor's capabilities through more advanced scene work and character study. Pr.: THTRE 261 and consent of instructor.

*THTRE 565. Principles of Directing. (3)  Principles, processes, and techniques of directing for the theatre.  Pr: THTRE 261.  [*UGE Equivalent Course:  Approved only as an upper-division, major-specific UGE course with significant advanced writing.  Check with instructor before enrolling.]

THTRE 664. Creative Drama. (3) The development of creative imagination and personal well-being through theatre games, improvisation, storytelling, and puppetry for use in educational and recreational settings. Pr.: Junior standing.

THTRE 665. Drama Therapy with Special Populations. (3) I, II. The therapeutic uses of drama in the development of creative imagination, self expression, and social relatedness with special populations such as clients who have developmental disabilities, physical disabilities, health issues, or are aging. Pr.: Junior standing.

THTRE 672. American Ethnic Theatre. (3) Drama and stagecraft of ethnic groups in the United States, including the theatre of African, Asian, Hispanic, Jewish, and Native Americans. Pr.: Junior standing.

WOMST 105. Introduction to Women's Studies. (3) I, II, S. An interdisciplinary introduction to academic and community-based thinking about women's lives: (1) how gender inequality in society restricts women's development, limits their contributions to the dominant culture, and subjects women to systematic violence and (2) strategies with which women gain power within existing institutions and develop new models of social relations. Particular attention will be paid to issues of race, ethnicity, class and sexuality.

WOMST 380. Women and Global Social Change. (3) I.  This course explores contemporary approaches that help meet the needs of women and their families in different parts of the world, including the Plains region. Students will learn how approaches to social change in the Third World influence women in North America, and how First World women relate to women's movements and organizations in the Third World. Pr.: ENGL 100 or 110.

WOMST 450. The Stories of a Young Girl. (3) II. An interdisciplinary examination of female adolescence, focusing in particular on the way it is depicted in literature. Pr.: ENGL 100 or 110.

WOMST 480. Women & Environmentalism. (3) II. Because women have and continue to be an integral part of environmentalism in the U.S. and globally, this course examines the philosophical and historical intersections between women, nature and environmental activism.

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College of Business Administration

ACCTG 231. Accounting for Business Operations. (3) I, II S. An introduction to the operating activities of businesses and the roles that accounting information plays in planning, evaluating, and recording those activities. An introduction to financial statements is included. Pr.: Sophomore standing and MATH 100.  

ACCTG 241. Accounting for Investing and Financing. (3) I, II, S. Extends the concepts of planning and evaluation to the business activities of acquiring, disposing, and financing productive assets. Financial statement analysis will be covered. Pr.: ACCTG 231.

FINAN 250. Personal Investing and Risk Management. (3), II. Provides a framework for identifying, analyzing, and managing the lifetime financial risks faced by the average person. An overview of the types and mechanics of investment instruments, development of personal risk profiles and investment plans, asset allocation methods, diversifiable and non-diversifiable risk, and risk avoidance and hedging methods. Pr.: Sophomore standing and MATH 100.

MANGT 300. Introduction to Total Quality Management. (1) I, II S. Overview of major topics related to Total Quality Management (TQM), including managerial and engineering aspects. One hour lec. a week. Pr.: MATH 100, 205, or 220, sophomore standing. Cross listed with DEN 300.

MANGT 641. Management of Quality. (3) I. Development of quality as a management philosophy through the study of ideas from contemporary quality philosophies of Deming, Juran, and Taguchi. Statistical process control charting as a process and quality improvement tool and product and process design as important components of quality. Pr.: MANGT 421.

MKTG 400. Marketing. (3) I, II, S. A general study of marketing principles which lead to the development of marketing strategy. A review of environmental influences and key analytical tools used in formulating marketing plans. Product or service design, distribution, pricing, and promotional programs. Pr.: ECON 110 and 120, junior standing.

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College of Education

EDCEP 103. Healthful and Safe College Life. (3) I, II, S.  Addresses pertinent health education topics that impact college students and explores the effect of lifestyle choices on academic achievement.  Topics include sexual health, mental health, nutrition and fitness, alcohol/drugs/tobacco, injury and illness prevention education. Not intended to replace the HN 352 Personal Wellness course when required in a curriculum.

EDCEP 120. Academic and Career Decisions.  (1) I, II.   Addresses general principles of academic and career choice through lectures, class discussions, and individual research.  Topics include decision-making models and principles; exploration of interetes, abilities, and avalues through career assessments; and academic and career investigation using interactive software, library materials, online resources, and experiential learning opportunities.

EDCEP 312. Sexual Health Awareness Peer Educators (SHAPE) . (3) I, II. Application of a systematic approach to interaction skills in a paraprofessional helping relationship.  Includes background knowledge of listening skills and practice in emitting skills which influence interaction quality.  Pr.: Junior standing or sophomore standing and consent of instructor.

EDSP 500. Introduction to Human Exceptionality. (3) II. Survey of history and legal aspects of service, etiologies, characteristics, and special needs of exceptional individuals.

LEAD 212. Introduction to Leadership Concepts. (2-3) I, II. This course is organized to provide students with a broad overview of leadership theories, an introduction to ethical decision making, examination of personal leadership styles, and current societal issues for leaders. Pr.: None.

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College of Engineering

DEN 210. History of Building and Construction. (3) I. An introduction to the art and science of building. Historical review from ancient to contemporary including related construction methods, equipment, and systems. Three hours rec. a week.

DEN 325. Introduction to Personal and Professional Development. (1) I, II. Overview of major topics related to personal and professional development, including communication, leadership, teamwork, total quality management, and ethics. One hour lec. and one hour activity a week. Pr.: Sophomore standing.

DEN 582. Natural Resources/Environmental Sciences Project (NRES). (3) I, II. A comprehensive project in NRES. Requires integration of information and understanding acquired in NRES secondary major courses. Students must prepare and present written and oral reports. Three hours rec. a week. Pr.: ENGL 415, COMM 105. Pr. or conc.: 15 hours of approved courses in NRES secondary major. Cross listed with DAS 582 and GENAG 582.

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College of Human Ecology

FSHS 110. Introduction to Human Development. (3) I, II S. A study of life span human development through an individual's awareness and understanding of his or her own physical, social, and psychological growth and relationships with family, peers, and others.

FSHS 350. Family Relationships and Gender Roles. (3) I, II, S. Effects of family interaction upon individual development and gender roles; consideration of premarital, marital, and parent-child relationships. Pr.: FSHS 110 or PSYCH 110 or SOCIO 211.

FSHS 670. Working with Parents. (3) II, S. Approaches to parenting and parent education with emphasis on programmatic implications of life-span developmental principles within a family context. Pr.: FSHS 110; and FSHS 350 or 550.

GERON 315. Introduction to Gerontology. (3) I, II, S. Multidisciplinary introduction to the field of aging. Examines social, psychological, developmental, organizational, and economic aspects of aging. Theoretical, methodological, and applied issues of aging related to contemporary American society. Pr.: None.

GNHE 310. Human Needs. (3) I, II. Examination of theories of human needs from a human ecological perspective, with emphasis on the impact of human, economic, and material resources. Analysis of developmental, ethical, cultural, and public policy factors that influence need satisfaction. Pr.: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor.

HMD 340. Contemporary Issues: Controlled Beverages. (2) II. The study of historic, social, ethical, physiological, and legal issues relating to alcoholic beverage service and use in contemporary America with emphasis on responsible and knowledgeable service of beer, wine, and spirits in hospitality operations. Pr.: PSYCH 110 or SOCIO 211 or concurrent enrollment.

HN 132. Basic Nutrition. (3) I, II, S. Concepts of human nutrition applied to personal food choices and health.

HN 352. Personal Wellness. (3) I. Impact of the effect of personal actions on lifelong wellness. Practical methods of assessing, maintaining, and improving behaviors to reduce the risk of illness and disability. Emphasis on developing skills to make informed, responsible health decisions. Pr.: Sophomore standing.

ID 600. Interior Design Study Tour. (1-3) I, II, S. Supervised off-campus tour to acquaint the student with rich artistic and cultural locations around the world and expand student's global perspectives of the design profession.  Lectures and tours target important interior/architectural design and furniture collections. Pr.: HIST 101 or 102, or ART 195 or 196.

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College of Technology & Aviation

BUS 251. Financial Accounting. (3) I, II, S. Study of business topics such as alternative forms of business organizations; typical business practices; legal instruments such as notes, bonds, and stocks; and financial statements and analysis. The main objective is to develop the ability to provide information to stockholders, creditors, and others who are outside an organization.

BUS 252. Managerial Accounting. (3) I, II, S. This course outlines the use of internal accounting data by managers in directing the affairs of business and non-business organizations. Pr.: BUS 251.

BUS 315. Supervisory Management. (3) I, II, S. An analysis of the responsibilities and work environment of a supervisor, with an examination of skills, practices, and concepts helpful in the development of effective relations with people in today's changing environment. Pr. ENGL 100 and SPCH 105 or 106.

COT 150. The Humanities through the Arts. (3) II. A general introduction to the humanities, focusing on what they are and their basic importance.  Painting, sculpture, architecture, literature, drama, music, dance, film, and photography will be explored.  Emphasis will be on participation, involvement, guest speakers, tours, and appreciation.

ECET 100. Basic Electronics. (4) I. A survey course designed to provide an overview of basic direct and alternating current circuits and an introduction to linear and digital electronics.  Laboratory exercises reinforce circuit theory and provide skills in the use of common electronic instruments. Coreq.: MATH 100 or consent of instructor.

HIST 320. History of Technology. (3) This course focuses on the development of technology from ancient times to modern day, with emphasis on technology and American society from colonial times to present. Students will prepare a portfolio project that will feature a research or service learning component. PR.: ENGL 100 .

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University General Education (UGE)

For students who began at K-State before Summer 2011.