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Students of our undergraduate digital humanities research lab gain professional experience as they research, write, and publish Kansas history. Visit our digital archive of small town research papers here. Launch your research by visiting our resource page or arrange a visit to our Center at Kansas State University.

News & Events 

Chapman Center Intern and 2016 Graduate, Anthony Porter, Leaves Written Legacy
By Dr. MJ Morgan, Research and Curriculum Director, Chapman Center for Rural Studies

Anthony P, author of Magic study

Chapman Center for Rural Studies intern, Anthony Porter, a 2016 K-State graduate, Bachelor of Arts (BA) in history, left a written legacy of his time with us. Anthony’s study of the vanished community of Magic, Riley County, Kansas, appears in the May issue of Kansas Kin, published by the Riley County Genealogical Society (RCGS). “Magic: The Ultimate Vanishing Act” was an invited piece and marks the start of a fruitful collaboration between Chapman Center and RCGS.

Magic, Riley County, SchoolhouseWe hope to offer more student work for inclusion in Kansas Kin as undergraduate researchers tackle the long-disappeared communities, villages, and trading centers of a lost Kansas landscape. Like many of our researchers, Anthony used both documentary and oral history sources, conducting interviews with Magic community descendants.

Through leads and contacts often suggested by RCGS, students learn to piece together the fascinating and sometimes quirky history of rural Kansas. Readers can also enjoy Anthony’s study of Magic in our Lost Communities Archive, at http://lostkscommunities.omeka.net/items/show/180.(Click the link, scroll down below the featured photograph, and click the printer icon on the black top bar above the pdf-copy of Anthony’s Magic paper. You can now print off and read Anthony’s paper at your leisure.) 

Coming Soon: make sure to catch Anthon’s digital museum exhibit on the Quivira Society, an early 20th century amateur archaeology club in Wabaunsee County appearing later this summer in our Kansas History and Life Collection.

 


 Have you visited our blog,"The Rural Telegraph," featuring original student research or swung by the Chapman Center for Rural Studies on Facebook and Twitter? #MakeHistory and come on by.


 

Passion for History Evident in Student's Small Pox Research
In “The End of an Old Enemy: Smallpox in Clay County from 1900-1925,” Shannon Nolan discusses the devastating effect the epidemic had on the small communities in Clay County Smallpox in Clay County

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Spring Break in Western Kansas with New Friends
While K-State students searched for their Spring Break refreshment, the Chapman Center’s Executive Director headed west to forge new connections on behalf of Chapman Center for Rural Studies’ research. What did she find?

Student's Determination Opens Doors in Research
During the lengthy and complicated research process, all students are faced with obstacles of some form, but the roadblock Rachel surmounted was quite significant. She visited the Pearl three times... Read more

Oronoque: Out of the Ashes
“What comes to mind when you think of northwestern Kansas? Is it the rolling hills, prairie grass, fields of wheat and corn, or flowing streams? This paints a scene of Oronoque, Kansas. Discover more

History in Action: Students help restore Maple City School House
Students in Dr. Bonnie-Lynn Sherow's History of American Agriculture and Food class recently traveled to Maple City, Cowley County, Kansas, to help restore the town site's school house. Learn more here

Explorations in Public History
Spring 2015 
Dr. Lynn-Sherow led her Public History class through several collaborative projects exploring Lost Kansas Communities, historic preservation, digital humanities, museum curation, and even WikipediaDiscover more

Summer 2015 Busy with Research, Digitization, and Exhibit Development
Meet the Chapman Center Summer 2015 Research Team and learn about their projects here.

Field Research and the Chapman Center for Rural Studies
Learn how History comes to life and students explore Kansas history. Read more
 A Rediscovered Legacy
Thanks to diligent research by Chapman Center Intern, Michael Spachek, the once forgotten history of a substantial group of Wabaunsee County black farm families has been brought to life. Read more

Adams' Collection Research Honors Family
Jessica Hermesch worked with a donated collection of military records to build a service narrative of George Adams, Sr., World War I soldier. Read more

Chapman Center Presents Alan Winkler with Bruntzel Award
The Chapman Center for Rural Studies is pleased to announce Alan Winkler, retired Wabaunsee County Historical Museum Curator, as the recipient of the 2015 Bruntzel Award. Read more
In Loving Memory of Mark A. Chapman (1943-2014)
We lost a very close member of the K-State family early April 18, 2014. Mark A. Chapman passed away at 71. Read more

The Chapman Center for Rural Studies is an undergraduate research-based center that provides hands-on experience in doing the real work of historians. We are located in 111 Leasure Hall in the heart of the Kansas State University campus in Manhattan, Kansas.

Office hours: Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Call us at 785-532-0380.

Search through the Chapman Center's on-going project, the Lost Town Digital Archive: Lost Kansas Communities.


For more information, email us or email the Executive Director, Professor Bonnie Lynn-Sherow.

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