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Division of Biology

Division of Biology
Kansas State University
116 Ackert Hall
Manhattan, KS 66506
785-532-6615
785-532-6653 fax
biology@k-state.edu

Jocelyn McDonald, Assistant Professor

Jocelyn McDonald

Contact information

239B Chalmers Hall
(785) 532-6087
jmcdona@ksu.edu

Lab website: http://mcdonaldlab.org/

Education

Ph.D. 1998, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Cell and Developmental Biology.

Area(s) of Specialization

Developmental and cell biology; cell migration; tissue morphogenesis.

Research Focus

The overall interest of my laboratory is to understand how cell migration is regulated within the normal three-dimensional environment of tissues. We are particularly interested in a type of migration called "collective" migration, in which small to large groups of cells coordinate and move together. Cells move collectively during normal physiological processes, such as during embryonic development and wound healing, whereas abnormal collective migration contributes to birth defects, tumor metastasis in cancer, failure of wounds to heal, and other disease pathologies. Therefore, it is of fundamental medical importance to identify the genetic, cellular, and molecular mechanisms that control this type of cell movement.

My laboratory primarily uses border cells, a model of collective cell migration in tissues. These six to 10 cells move as a cohesive group during development of the ovary in the model organism Drosophila melanogaster (the fruit fly). The variety of sophisticated genetic and molecular tools in Drosophila allow us to identify new genes that control movement of border cells. Many of these genes have counterparts in humans, and the ultimate goal of the lab is to determine whether the genes identified in Drosophila also regulate human cell migration in pathological contexts.

We use a combination of live imaging, genetics and cell biological approaches to uncover mechanisms that control multicellular collective cell migration. Ongoing interests in the lab include: how groups of cells break away from epithelia to become migratory; how individual cells adhere together and become coordinated to produce group movement; and interplay of cell polarity and cytoskeletal regulatory proteins in collective migration. Finally, we have an ongoing collaboration with investigators at the Cleveland Clinic to apply our findings in the Drosophila border cell model to tumor invasion, particularly in glioblastoma.

Selected Publications

Aranjuez G, Burtscher A, Sawant K, Majumder P, McDonald JA. 2016. Dynamic myosin activation promotes collective morphology and migration by locally balancing oppositional forces from surrounding tissue. Mol Biol Cell. 2016 Jun 15;27(12):1898-910. doi: 10.1091/mbc.E15-10-0744. PMID: 27122602.

Veeman MT, McDonald JA. 2016. Dynamics of cell polarity in tissue morphogenesis: a comparative view from Drosophila and Ciona. F1000Res. 2016 Jun 2;5. pii: F1000 Faculty Rev-1084. doi: 10.12688/f1000research.8011.1. Review. PMID: 27303647.

McDonald JA. 2014. Canonical and noncanonical roles of Par-1/MARK kinases in cell migration. Int Rev Cell Mol Biol. 312:169-199. Review. PMID: 25262242.

Geisbrecht ER, Sawant K, Su Y, Liu ZC, Silver DL, Burtscher A, Wang X, Zhu AJ, McDonald JA. 2013. Genetic Interaction Screens Identify a Role for Hedgehog Signaling in Drosophila Border Cell Migration. Dev Dyn. 242: 414-31. PMID: 23335293. PMCID: PMC3721345.

Aranjuez G, Kudlaty E, Longworth MS, McDonald JA. 2012. On the role of PDZ domain-encoding genes in Drosophila border cell migration. G3 (Bethesda). 2: 1379-1391. PMID: 23173089. PMCID: PMC3484668.

Majumder P, Aranjuez G, Amick J, McDonald JA. 2012. Par-1 Controls Myosin-II Activity Through Myosin Phosphatase To Regulate Border Cell Migration. Curr Biol. 22: 363-372. PMID: 22326025. PMCID: PMC3298626.

McDonald JA, Khodyakova A, Aranjuez G, Dudley C, Montell DJ. 2008. The Par-1 serine/threonine kinase regulates epithelial detachment and directional protrusion of migrating border cells. Curr. Biol. 18: 1659-1667. PMID: 18976916. PMCID: PMC2593744.

View the complete publication list in NCBI