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K-State Today

April 26, 2017



Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz to present Hageman Distinguished Lecture at 4 p.m. today

By Melinda Bainter

Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz, member of the National Academy of Sciences and researcher at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Research Campus, will present, "Emerging fluorescence technology to study cell architecture and dynamics" at 4 p.m. April 26 in Town Hall of the Leadership Studies Building.

Lippincott-Schwartz also will present a research colloquium "Imaging cell survival under starvation: role of lipid droplets, mitochondria and autophagy" at 9 a.m. April 27 in the Terry C. Johnson Cancer Research Center, 36 Chalmers Hall.

Both events are part of the Richard H. and Elizabeth C. Hageman Distinguished Lectureship in Agricultural Biochemistry sponsored by the biochemistry and molecular biophysics department. The lecture and colloquium are free and open to the public.

During 30 years at NIH, and now at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Lippincott-Schwartz has studied dynamic aspects of the cell biology of the ER, Golgi, lysosomes and vesicles, using fluorescence techniques to visualize movement, assembly and disassembly. Her recent approaches resolve cellular targets beyond the diffraction limit of visible light, using photo-activated localization microscopy. Lippincott-Schwartz served as president of the American Society of Cell Biology in 2014. She received numerous awards for microscopy, authored 200 peer-reviewed papers, and co-authored a text in the Journal of Cell Biology.

The Richard H. and Elizabeth C. Hageman Distinguished Lectureship in Agricultural Biochemistry is made possible by the generous endowment provided by the Hagemans. Professor Hageman was recognized "for his formulation that rate-limiting enzymes could be identified and used as a basis to select for specific traits which lead to higher crop yields. This singular focus, which resulted from and contributed to his research on nitrate reductase, is so basic and now so readily understood that it is taken for granted in all of plant science." His major contributions to the understanding of plant nitrogen metabolism included the finding that nitrate reductase is an inducible enzyme, and identification of nitrite reductase as a distinct enzyme dependent on ferredoxin in chloroplasts.

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