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Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work

ANTHROPOLOGY COURSES

INTRODUCTORY COURSES

Anthropology Majors must take introductory classes in all four subfields, and 301 (Initiation to Anthropology)

Anthropology Minors must take two out of the four introductory classes.

Course Number  & Title

Professor

Description

Terms offered

Requirements Fulfilled

ANTH 200/204/210

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Wesch, Durbin,
Falcone, and Klataske

Cultural Anthropology explores different cultures in all of their manifestations - from how people make a living to what people live for.  This course examines the diversity of people around the world, and how different aspects of culture (such as economics, politics, family structures, and religion) influence one another, and explore the possibilities and challenges of our increasingly globalized world.  This course will also help you recognize your own cultural biases and questioning the assumptions, beliefs, concepts, and ideas you may have previously taken for granted. There is also an online version of the course available.  ANTH 210 is an Honors course, and only available in fall semesters. 

Go to ANTH101.com for more details about the course, offered on campus & distant ed (enroll through Global Campus).

Fall & Spring

 KS-8: Global issues and perspectives, Social sciences.

Basic: Social science, International studies overlay.

ANTH 220

Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology

 Managan

This is a broadly-based entry-level introduction to linguistic anthropology stressing the interactions between language and culture, and between language and social identity. By the end of the course, you should be acquainted with the basics of linguistic analysis, be aware of fundamental similarities and differences among all human languages, and have an informed perspective on issues of language that have an impact on our society. Most importantly, in this class you will acquire the essential tools for learning and analyzing languages in social and cultural contexts, and for understanding the basics of cross-cultural communication.

Fall & Spring

KS-8: Human diversity within the US, Social Sciences.

Basic: Social science, International studies overlay

ANTH 260

Introduction to Archaeology

Ritterbush

Archaeology strives to understand past human societies through the systematic study of their material remains.  In this course students are introduced to the goals of anthropological archaeology and general methods and approaches to interpreting our human past.  Through a survey of past human societies in various parts of the world, students will not only learn about people and cultures of very ancient times, but develop an understanding of how and why humanity developed into the diverse world of today.

 

Fall & Spring

KS-8: Historical perspectives, Social Sciences.

Basic: Social science, International studies overlay

NRES: Social Sciences and Humanities

ANTH 280

Introduction to Biological Anthropology

Alfonso-Durruty and Durband

This course explores the scope of Biological Anthropology.  Students will develop an understanding of: 1) evolutionary theory and evolutionary processes, 2) patterns of adaptation to the environment in primates, and 3) human evolution, human adaptation and human variation.

Fall & Spring

KS-8: Historical perspectives, Natural and Physical Sciences.

Basic: Natural sciences - Life science with a lab.

(Required for Life Science majors)

ADVANCED ANTHROPOLOGY COURSES

Anthropology Majors must take a minimum of 15 credits in advanced classes (300-level or above), in at least three of the four subfields. A minimum of nine of these fifteen credits must be from the 500-level or above.

Anthropology Majors also are required (in addition to the above 15 credit hours) to successfully complete ANTH 301 and ANTH 602 (see Cultural Anthropology Courses below).

Anthropology Minors must take a minimum four advanced anthropology electives (300-level or above) (12 credit hours).

ARCHAEOLOGY COURSES

Course Number  & Title

Professor

Description

Terms offered

Requirements Fulfilled

ANTH 365

Exploring Kansas Archaelogy

Ritterbush

Exploration of the archaeological record of past Native peoples of Kansas and the Central Plains and their diverse lifeways. Evening class. 

Occasional

KS8: Historical Perspective

Basic: Social sciences

ANTH 560 

Archaeological Fact or Fiction

(formerly ANTH 503)

Ritterbush

Many of us are fascinated by the "mysteries" of our human past, devouring popular literature and news stories about archaeological discoveries and long-held ideas about spatially and temporally "exotic" cultures.  But, how valid are the interpretations of these discoveries?   Hone your critical thinking and research skills through the evaluation of varied claims about the human past and explore the effects of our interpretations of the past on modern societies!  A wide range of archaeological case studies are explored including the moundbuilder myth, ancient North American inscriptions, Vikings in the Americas, lost civilizations, advanced prehistoric technologies, archaeology and politics in India, and much more.  (ANTH 260 or a demonstrated knowledge of archaeological methods and approaches, as well as major cultural developments through time is prerequisite for this course. Successful completion of ENGL 200/expository writing II is also recommended.)

Fall

KS-8: Empirical and quantitative reasoning, Social Sciences.


Basic: Social science.

ANTH 561 

Archaeological Field Methods

(formerly ANTH 535)

 Logan & Ritterbush

 This field class introduces students to archaeological field methods, including basic artifact identification, pedestrian survey; GPS, total station, and unit mapping; excavation and associated skills and interpretation; various forms of record-keeping, and more through hands-on training and experience in a field research situation.  The field school is commonly held in June in even-numbered years.  (This is an essential course for anyone considering a career in archaeology, but also a useful course for anyone interesting in experiencing archaeology first hand.)  Supplementary fees are required to cover field supplies and daily transportation.  Students must be in good physical condition, prepared to spend the entire day outdoors, have had a tetanus shot within the past 10 years, and carry health insurance.  Consent of instructor through an application process is required prior to enrolling.  Further information and the application form are available through the course website (http://www.k-state.edu/sasw/anth/field-school/index.html). See a brief  story and video of the 2016 field school here and 2010 field school here.

 

Summer

(occasional)

 

KS-8: Empirical and Quantitative Reasoning

Basic: Social science

ANTH 562 

Archaeology Laboratory Methods

(formerly ANTH 540)

Logan

 After initial collection of archaeological remains and associated contextual information through fieldwork, data collection, analysis, and interpretation continues in the lab.  This class, held in the K-State archaeology lab, provides hands-on experience with sorting, classifying, and analyzing actual archaeological remains.  Students learn about different types of archaeological documentation, common artifacts, and basic analyses while working with materials from a site in Kansas.  This is an essential course for anyone considering a career in archaeology, but also for those simply interested in exploring archaeological remains through hands-on analysis, material culture and its interpretation, learning about the process of archaeological analysis, and regional archaeology.  No previous archaeological experience is necessary although an introductory course in archaeology (such as ANTH 260 Introduction to Archaeology) is required.  This course is designed for Sophomores through Seniors.

  Fall

 KS-8: Empirical and Quantitative Reasoning.

Basic: Social science.

ANTH 568

Topics in Archaeology

 Giles

Archaeology of Ancient Symbols (S18) - This class explores how different types of archaeological and art historical analyses can provide insights into the symbols and religious beliefs of past peoples through a series of case studies from the Americas. We will explore how archaeologists assess the material symbols of past peoples through examining their 1) depositional context, 2) use wear, and 3) production, which in turn can lead to more sophisticated analyses of exchange patterns, social structure and meaning. In particular, we will discuss how archaeologists have theorized the role that material symbols play in social communication and information exchange, as well as the way in which symbols have been argued to structure and constitute peoples’ worldviews. We will contrast these perspectives with art historical, iconographic approaches to representational imagery that assesses the meaning of particular motifs and themes, through a ‘configurational’ approach. Students will draw on these perspectives to develop their own assessment of a particular archaeological symbol or set of symbols, in their term paper.  (ANTH 260 or a comparable introductory course in archaeology is prerequisite.)

 

Occasional

 

 

KS-8: None.

Basic: Social science.

ANTH 565  

North American Archaeology

(formerly ANTH 570)

 Ritterbush

 This course explores the archaeological evidence of native peoples of North America prior to European contact.  The archaeology of various cultures in different parts of North America are studied, including in the Desert West and eastern Woodlands.  Throughout the semester we address questions professional archaeologists are addressing through new discoveries and analytical technologies.  Among the specific issues we explore are interpreting how, when, and by whom the Americas were first settled; how Puebloan and Hohokam farmers adapted to the diverse environments of the American Southwest and how and why their cultures changed through time; and why did moundbuilding become a major activity of many different groups at different times in the Midwest and Southeastern United States.  Broad course objectives include critical thinking, culture change, and cultural diversity in native North America prior to European contact.  (ANTH 260 or comparable introductory archaeology course is required for enrollment.)

 

Spring  (Odd Years)

 

KS-8: Historical Perspectives.

Basic: Social science

ANTH 665

European Archaeology

(formerly ANTH 676)

Ritterbush

Survey of human prehistory in Europe from the earliest Paleolithic hominins to evolve in Europe, expansion of Homo sapiens and associated cultural  developments, the spread of agriculture, diversity of Bronze Age adaptations, to the development of Celtic societies. Studies of archaeological and related evidence are investigated to interpret the dynamics of past ways of living.

Spring (Even years)

 

 

KS-8: Historical perspectives.

Basic: Social science

 

BIOANTHROPOLOGY COURSES

Course Number  & Title

Professor

Description

Terms offered

Requirements Fulfilled

ANTH 380 

Introduction to Human Evolution

Durband

A beginning survey of the human fossil record, including an introduction to evolutionary theory and a discussion of the place that humans occupy among the other primates. (No prerequisites required.)

 Fall 

KS-8:Natural and Physical Sciences.

Basic: None.

ANTH 383 Plagues

(formerly ANTH 333)

Alfonso-Durruty This class applies evolutionary theory and principles to the study of health and disease in both past and contemporary populations. This course enhances the student's understanding of diseases and disorders as interactions that occur in a specific cultural and historical setting (No prerequisite necessary)

 Fall

 

KS-8: Historical perspectives, Natural and Physical Sciences.

Basic: Natural sciences.

ANTH 388 

Topics in Physical Anthropology:  

 

(formerly ANTH 330)

Campbell

(S18)

Nutritional Anthropology - S18 (388 A)
Course description: Nutritional anthropologists study the evolution, current diversity and clinical and social significance of the human diet and nutrition. This course will introduce students to nutritional anthropology as a distinct field of study that draws on methods, theory, and data from anthropology, sociology, gender studies, ecology, biology, epidemiology and nutritional science. The overall goal of the course is to understand why people eat what they eat and the biological impacts of consumption. We will concentrate on how ecology and evolution as well as social, cultural, and political forces influence our dietary choices and nutritional status, and how dietary choices impact on society. By the end of the course students should have a general understanding of basic human nutrition. The course is heavily biased towards an empirical perspective, and on critical thinking and hands-on exercises.
 

Eating: The Bioanthropology of Food and Subsistence - S18 (388 B)
Course description: The production and consumption of food is one of the most direct ways humans interact with their environments and one of the most culturally elaborated areas of human experience. In this course we will explore food production, consumption, and subsistence patterns from an interdisciplinary, cross-cultural perspective with an emphasis on critical reflection on our own individual and cultural foodways. By the end of this course, students will gain a better understanding of the major modes of production that societies have used to produce food throughout human history (including foraging, horticulture, pastoralism, agriculture, and industrialism) as well as the biological impacts and cultural aspects of production and consumption.  The second half of the course will focus on the modern US food system and contemporary issues, many of them global—food policies, nutrition, the genetic modification of foodstuffs, sustainable agriculture, environmental degradation, the safety of our food, and food (in)security.

 Occasional

KS-8:Natural and Physical Sciences.

Basic: None.

ANTH 680

Forensic Anthropology

Alfonso-Durruty

In this course students learn and apply the theories and techniques/methods anthropologists use to identify individuals, and assess the cause of death in a medico-legal setting.

Spring  (Even years)

 

KS-8: None.

Basic: Natural sciences.

ANTH 681

Primatology

(formerly ANTH 691)

Durband

Survey of the primate order including considerations of anatomy and behavior. Particular emphasis will be given to exploring the ecological constraints that drive the evolution of certain behaviors.  (ANTH 280 or a comparable introductory biological/physical anthropology course is prerequisite.) (ANTH 280 or a comparable introductory biological/physical anthropology course is prerequisite.)

Fall 

KS-8: Natural and Physical Sciences.

Basic: Natural sciences.

ANTH 682

Human Growth and Development

(formerly ANTH 692)

Alfonso-Durruty

Provides an anthropological examination of the process of growth and development in humans that emphasizes both the biological, evolutionary, and cultural aspects that have shaped them. Emphasis is given to the evolution of the life cycle, as well as the social and environmental conditions that affect human growth.

Occasional

KS-8: Natural and Physical Sciences.

Basic: Natural sciences.

ANTH 683

Osteology (Lecture & Laboratory)

(formerly ANTH 694 & 695)

Alfonso-Durruty

Thiscourse offers a detailed introduction to the form and function of the human skeleton. Student are instructed on the identification of the different bones and their landmarks. Additional topics include a brief review on estimations of sex and age based on skeletal remains. 

Spring  (Odd years)

 

KS-8: Natural and Physical Sciences.

Basic: Natural sciences.

ANTH 686

Bioarchaeology

(formerly ANTH 696)

Alfonso-Durruty

This course explores how archaeologists and bioanthropologists approach the study of death, mortuary practices and skeletal remains, to reconstruct past lives and understand the associated behavior.

Fall 

KS-8: Natural and Physical Sciences, Social Sciences.

Basic: Natural sciences.

 

CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY COURSES

Course Number  & Title

Professor

Description

Terms offered

Requirements Fulfilled

ANTH 301

Initiation to Anthropology

Wesch

Identify and apply the core elements of the anthropological perspective while learning professional and academic writing and presentation skills.

REQUIRED for ANTH MAJORS

Spring

KS-8: Social Sciences.

Basic: Social science.

ANTH 305 

Cultures of South Asia

(formerly ANTH 345)

Falcone

This course will provide an interdisciplinary exploration of some of the cultures of the South Asian region (including nations such as, India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh, the Maldives, Bhutan, and Sri Lanka).  We will examine thematic issues of colonization, religion, nationalism, modernity, sexuality, gender, globalization and social stratification in their various South Asian contexts.  By supplementing our scholarly readings about the region with Bollywood films and other popular media, we will trace the cultural contours of contemporary South Asian societies.

 Occasional

 KS-8: Global Issues and Perspectives, Social Sciences. 

Basic: Social science,International studies overlay.

ANTH 315

Medical Anthropology

Durbin

 Medical Anthropology:  Medical anthropology provides a unique way of understanding the universal human experiences of sickness and death and the various medical systems that all cultures have for dealing with these inevitabilities. Medical anthropology also seeks to understand how health and illness is influenced by environment, genetic inheritance, and socio-economic circumstances. This course will, first, introduce students to the basic vocabularies and conceptual frameworks for understanding human health and illness from an holistic perspective. Second, it will help students learn how to apply this understanding and build cultural competence by studying a series of real cases. Themes include: ethnomedicine and its interactions with biomedicine; social constructions of the body; structural violence and global health; ethnicity, race, and health; gender and health; and culture and nutrition.

 Fall

 

KS-8: Global Issues and Perspectives, Social Sciences.

Basic: Social science.


ANTH 318 

Topics in Cultural Anthropology

 

 

 

TBD

 

 Occasional Topics.

 Occasional.

 

ANTH 515  

Creativity and Culture

Falcone

This course will take an anthropological approach to the study of art by examining them as forms of embodied and material cultural knowledge that can reveal much about the social worlds in which things are made, as well as the ways that margins are challenged by artists working to make something new.  We will explore the construction of representation, aesthetics and artistry in various cultural contexts.  Is invention bounded by the genius of an individual, or the limits of a particular cultural milieu?  Who decides what is art, and what it should mean?   Who gets to define what is authentic, and/or what is innovative?

Fall (even years)

KS-8: Aesthetic Interpretation.

Basic: Humanities - Fine Arts, Social science, International studies overlay.

ANTH 516

Ethnomusicology

Falcone

This course will take an anthropological approach to the study of performance arts.  While the course will maintain an emphasis on music cultures, the readings also draw attention to the art worlds of dance and theatre. Embodied and performed cultural knowledge can reveal a great deal about the social worlds in which performances take place.  We will explore the cultural construction of representation and identity, aesthetics, artistry and power in various performance contexts.  Is invention bounded by the genius of an individual, or the limits of a particular cultural milieu?  Who gets to define what is authentic, and/or what is innovative?  Who decides what a performance should mean to the audience or the performer?   Among other things, we will read about Indian performance forms in flux, a Tibetan refugee rock band, brass bands in New Orleans, shamanic artists, and Hawaiian performance arts.

Fall (odd years)

 

KS-8: Aesthetic Interpretation.

Basic: Humanities - Fine Arts, Social Science, International studies overlay.

ANTH 602

Anthropological Theory

 Durbin

Review and integration of the major theoretical approaches in the principal branches of anthropology.

REQUIRED for ANTH MAJORS

(Will be offered S18 instead of F17. If you are graduating Dec 2017 and need this course, see your advisor about enrolling in SOC 431.)

Occasional

KS-8:Historical Perspectives.

Basic: Social science.

ANTH 608

Asian Religions

Falcone

This course explores the major religious traditions that developed in Asia. It focuses on traditions, literature and rituals that emerged in India (e.g. Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism) as well as religious movements that developed in Thailand, Tibet, China and Japan (e.g. Confucianism, Taoism, Shinto, and Buddhist sectarian movements). Among other themes, the course explores: the relationship between an individual's religious and social obligations, the role of religion in the legitimization of political entities; transcendent religious ideals and the realities of human existence; renunciant social worlds (e.g. nunneries and monasteries), and meditation practices associated with variable notions of enlightenment. 

Spring (even years)

 

 

ANTH 612

Ethnohistory

(formerly ANTH 660)

 Ritterbush

 This advanced cultural anthropology methods course immerses students in the ethnohistoric method, which applies an anthropological perspective to understanding earlier human societies through analysis of primary historical and ethnographic documents.  Typically a semester-long case study is employed with 'hands-on' analysis of historical records and ethnographic studies.  In addition to learning to extract and critically interpret cultural information from these sources, students experience reconstruction of a past culture over time.  Secondary goals include uncovering understanding of culture change and the holistic nature of anthropology.

 

Occasional

 

 

KS-8: Historical Perspectives, Social Sciences.

Basic: Social science.

ANTH 616 

Apocalypse & Prophecy: the Anthropology of Futurity

(formerly ANTH 650)

 Falcone

 For the messianic prophet, the inventor, the environmentalist, and so many other individuals and communities, "the future" pervades and shapes the present moment, and vice versa.   We will look at distinct notions of time, progress, hope and fear, planning, utopia and dystopia, world-ending and world-renewal from various societies around the world.

 Spring

(odd years)

 

KS-8: Global Issues and Perspectives, Human Diversity within the US.

Basic: Social science.

ANTH 618

Religion in Culture

 Wesch

Introduction to religions of the world and anthropological theories for understanding how they relate to other aspects of culture, why they are similar, why and how they are different.

 Fall

KS-8: Social Sciences.

Basic: Social science

ANTH 710 

Writing Culture: Ethnographic Methods

(formerly ANTH 790)

 Falcone

 How does one write about culture?  In this course, we will interrogate issues of truth, representation and ethics vis-à-vis ethnography, creative non-fiction, ethnographic fiction.  This course will combine theoretical and critical reading on writing cultures with more practical readings on the normative field methods of cultural anthropologists.  The course evolves into a writing workshop towards the completion of a final, polished ethnographic product. This will be an opportunity to do participant observation of a local subculture and write up your results in a cohesive, anthropological, ethical manner. Students have the opportunity to publish their final polished mini-ethnographies in a class book.

 Spring

 

KS-8: Ethical reasoning and responsibility, Human Diversity within the US.


Basic: Social Science.

ANTH 715 

Digital Ethnography

(formerly ANTH 777)

Wesch

In this class, you will learn how to actually *do* an ethnographic project using, harnessing, and leveraging the always emerging possibilities of digital media. Over the past 4 years students have moved in to a retirement community (Meadowlark Hills) and done real ethnography, producing several short documentaries, including To Live in This World, which was accepted into the Ethnographilm Festival in Paris, France.

There are many more great videos by students you can view here: https://www.youtube.com/user/mwesch  Work from this class has been featured on BBC, ABCnews.com, CurrentTV, local ABC and NBC television stations, the Margaret Mead Film Festival, several newspapers and magazines worldwide, and the Chronicle of Higher Education (just to name a few).  Several students have gone on into great careers in digital media starting with this class.

Spring

KS-8: Aesthetic Interpretation, Social Sciences.


Basic: Social science.

 

LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY

Course Number  & Title

Professor

Description

Terms offered

Requirements Fulfilled

ANTH 328 

Topics in Linguistic Anthropology:

(formerly ANTH 323 - Language and Gender)

 Managan

 Language and Performance (S18) - 

Occasional

KS-8: Global issues and Perspectives, Social Sciences.

Basic: Social science.

ANTH 525

Language and Culture

 

 Managan

Study of language and dialect as aspects of social and ethnic group identities. Emphasis on analysis of conversational style in diverse cultural settings. Research project to be determined according to student interests.

Occasional

KS-8: Ethical Reasoning and Responsibility, Global Issues and  Perspectives.

Basic: Social science

ANTH 528

Topics in Linguistic Anthropology:

Managan

Language and Media (S18) - This course, designed for undergraduates with some linguistic background, focuses on linguistic anthropological approaches to mediatized communication. We will explore the role of media in creating or defining language communities, how media shape our impressions of different people and their ways of speaking, and how mediatized communication is culturally patterned. Special consideration will be given to the impact of digital media technologies on language and social organization. In addition to reading and articles and a full-length ethnography and watching documentaries, students will conduct their own analyses of language in media. 

Occasional

 

 

ANTH 720

Field Methods in Linguistic Anthropology

(formerly ANTH 792)

 Managan

Techniques of collecting and analyzing linguistic data as a means of understanding culture.

Occasional

 

KS-8: None.

Basic: Social science, International studies overlay.