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National Bio and Agro-defense Facility

Documents and resources

National Bio and Agro-defense Facility — NBAF — Overview (pdf) 
A visual overview of NBAF is provided that includes the: (1) NBAF mission;   (2) basis for why NBAF is needed; (3) key elements to winning NBAF; (4) $1.25 billion construction funding breakdown; (5) "hardened" facility design features; (6) construction status; and (7) summary information.

Safeguarding American Agriculture in a Globalized World: 12/13/2017 Testimony (pdf)  
The problems of HSPD-9 not being enforced today was addressed in a Farm Bill hearing of the U.S. Senate Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry Committee on December 13, 2017.  Testimony provided by K-State President Richard Myers addressed three key elements: (1) global biothreats to U.S. agriculture and potential consequences; (2) foundational public policy components of HSPD-9 intended to confront global biothreats; and (3) a proposed path forward which requires the six HSPD-9 biothreat readiness essentials [(A)-(F)] illustrated below to be in federal statute(s). President Myers was Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff from 2001 to 2005, which gives him a unique perspective on global bioterrorism threats. He's very familiar with al-Qaeda's work on bioweapons post-9/11 intended to target not just people, but U.S. crops and livestock as well. Moreover, he also knows multiple terrorist groups and countries are still exploring the use of such bioweapons today. 

Readiness Response

A bioterrorist attack on American agriculture - crops, livestock - and food could devastate the U.S. economy; naturally occurring diseases hitting the U.S. could do the same. Disaster responses to either come with a significant costs to the nation, as avian influenza and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus outbreaks have proven in recent years. Without a fully vetted, nationwide biothreat readiness system as called for in HSPD-9, the monetary consequences associated with bio/agro-disaster responses could grow exponentially...and likely would.

Bio/Agro Security Enterprise (pdf)
Kansas State University's Bio/Agro Security Enterprise (BASE) includes diverse and century-long programs involved in protecting America's food crops, food animals (livestock), food supply and public health. Thus, it is broader than the NBAF mission, which is focused exclusively on protecting animal health and public health.

Base R&D

NBAF and Other Bio/Agro Security Research in the BRI (pdf)
This PDF Summary documents NBAF-related livestock infectious disease research capabilities at Kansas State University, along with crop disease and food safety research proficiencies.BRI 11-26 Pic

The Silicon Valley for Biodefense (pdf)  
The new, 2017 description of the evolving innovation district around NBAF is "the Silicon Valley for Biodefense," thanks to former Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle with the Blue Ribbon Study Panel for Biodefense.  He invoked that nomenclature during Panel hearings at Kansas State, January 26, 2017, entitled "Agrodefense: Challenges and Solutions." Manhattan, Kansas is where government/industry/university R&D partnerships are already providing solutions to emerging biological threats.

The Silicon Valley for Biodefense

Kansas State University's 1999 Homeland Defense Program (pdf) 
This 1999 document — which became known as "The Big Purple Book" — outlined the university’s Homeland Defense Food Safety, Security and Emergency Preparedness Program. The 100-page strategic plan for bio/agrodefense served as the blueprint for the Biosecurity Research Institute (BRI) at Pat Roberts Hall and multiple supporting programs.

First Responder

Kansas State University's 1999 U.S. Senate Testimony (pdf) 
Kansas State University's former president, Jon Wefald, presented testimony before the U.S. Senate's Emerging Threats Subcommittee, chaired by Kansas Senator Pat Roberts, on Oct. 27, 1999. The title was, Agricultural Biological Weapons Threats: Food Safety, Security, and Emergency Preparedness. Few others were concerned with protecting American agriculture - crops, livestock - and food from global bioterrorists back then.