What can I do with a Women's Studies Degree?

  • If you are planning on entering one of the "helping" professions, Women's Studies is critical to your job.
    • To teach about women and men in non-sexist ways is one of the biggest challenges faced by teachers and professors at all levels of education.
    • To understand public policy questions which revolve around assumptions about what women and men do, assumptions that are rapidly changing as men and women push for equality at home and at work.
    • To write about women's issues – from analysis of the gender gap through comparable worth, to test tube babies – requires a thorough grounding in women's history, experience, and modes of expression.
  • If you are planning on business, Women's Studies can help you.
    • Understanding that market research and advertising may be based on sexist interpretations that are "bad for business" is useful in product development.
    • Knowing that product design may reflect views of gender behavior no longer appropriate to vast segments of the market is essential for good business.
    • Being a good manager involves understanding worker stress to be a major factor in productivity, a stress often based in work-family relationships.
    • Realizing that many facets of international business rely on women as industrial workers and as agricultural laborers, especially in the "Third World," is crucial for future development.
  • If you are planning on medicine, there is much in Women's Studies to help you on the job.
    • In internal medicine, knowing that women and men differ in how they report symptoms and that prescription drugs abuse is a major women's health issue can help you to be an effective physician.
    • In obstetrics and gynecology, familiarity with the history of women as healers, the reemergence of midwifery as a profession, and alternative approaches to fertility control and birth is useful.
    • In pediatrics, awareness of changing family patterns, of single-parent households and of the involvement of fathers in children's healthcare helps in providing optimal care.
  • If you are planning on law, women's studies will help you on the job.
    • A good background in women's history and the study of gender roles is essential to understanding discrimination law.
    • Knowledge of changing family and work patterns is fundamental to providing effective assistance to clients in general private practice.
    • Awareness of how women and men function in corporate settings will give you an edge in your professional life.

For more career information, visit the National Women's Studies Association: www.nwsa.org

Graduate Work related to Women's Studies

  • MA in Women's Studies
  • PhD in Women's Studies
  • Law School (JD)
  • Medical School
  • Business School (MBA)
  • MA/PhD in related fields:
    • Area Studies
    • Cultural Studies
    • English
    • Fine and Performing Arts
    • History
    • International Studies
    • Organizational Studies
    • Philosophy
    • Public Administration
    • Political Science
    • Sociolog

Careers in Women's Studies

  • Administrative Office/Govt.
  • Advocate for Social Groups
  • Archivist
  • Attorney
  • Bank Officer
  • Business Manager
  • Consultant
  • Credit Manager
  • Editor
  • Educator
  • FBI/CIA Agent
  • Grant Writer
  • Human resources Officer
  • Journalist
  • Legislative Assistant
  • Librarian
  • Lobbyist
  • Market Researcher
  • Museum Exhibit Developer
  • News Correspondent
  • Non-Profit Funding Manager
  • Paralegal
  • VISTA Worker
  • Politician
  • Professor/Teacher
  • Public Relations
  • Real Estate Agent/Broker
  • Reporter
  • Researcher
  • Retail Buyer
  • Sales Representative
  • Stockbroker
  • University Admissions
  • Social Worker
  • Senator/Representative
  • Policy Consultant