Final Report of the Survey of the Women of the K-State Faculty and Staff

Appendix A - Summary Report form the Office of Planning and Analysis

This is the final report summarizing the results from the Women of K-State and President’s Commission on the Status of Women survey that was administered August 10-20 and August 31-September 10.  In the initial offering (August 10-20), 2,543 women were asked to complete the survey, with 904 completing the survey, a 35.5% response rate. The follow up offering (August 31-September 10) consisting of non-State employees and a few individuals not included in the initial offering, 328 women were asked to complete the survey, with 75 completing the survey, a 22.9% response rate. Both response rates were less than ideal. However, the information gained from the survey may still be useful with future planning.

A brief summary of what we considered to be the most relevant results is given below.

  • Regarding Work Environment, the top three issues of importance were: Salary (38.4% said it was either the most important or second most important issue), Sufficient Employment Benefits (32.4%), and Handling meaningful projects/tasks in my position (31.0%).
  • Regarding Employee Benefits, Tuition Assistance received the highest percentage of respondents that were dissatisfied (22.7% were either Dissatisfied or Very Dissatisfied). One-third (34.2%) of the part-time respondents were not satisfied with Tuition Assistance benefits, the largest of any sub-group. Faculty were a close second with 31.4%.
  • Nearly one in five respondents (18.5%) felt that K-State has inadequate lighting on campus walkways.
  • Regarding Culture, 38.2% of the respondents did not feel that women were adequately represented among departmental leadership positions. Likewise, 34% felt that women were not adequately represented among college leadership positions.
    • The top three issues of importance were: Developing appropriate programs for female employee recruitment and retention (43.9% said it was either the most important or second most important issue), Developing appropriate support organizations for female employees (36.2%), and Increasing the number of university/college level leadership positions held by women (33.3%).
  • Regarding Family, 31.7% of respondents either disagreed or strongly disagreed that employees with children are treated the same as employees without children.
    • When separated by gender, only 14.7% of the respondents felt that men without children were treated differently then men with children. However, 37% of the respondents felt women without children were treated differently than women with children.
    • Over half of the respondents (51.5%) felt that childcare was an issue for every employee and nearly three quarters (72.2%) felt that child care facilities for K-State employees should be a priority.
  • Current Boss(43.6%), Family Support(39.7%), Co-Workers(38.9%), Education/Training (34.9%) and Previous Boss (32.3%) were the most popular contributors to career success. Budget Issues (51.8%), Equity in Pay (43.5%), and Work/Life Balance (38.5%) were the most popular barriers to carrier success.
  • The top three issues for the K-State community to address in the next two years were: Matching compensation with job requirements (57.6% said it was either the most important or second most important issue), Providing compensation for additional workloads during the latest budget crunch (36.6%), and Addressing issues of salary equity between males and females on campus (31.8%).
  • The top three issues for the K-State community to address in the next three to five years were: Increasing compensation for both men and women (33.4% said it was either the most important or second most important issue), Matching responsibility with compensation (29.9%), and Addressing issues of salary equity between males and females on campus (28.1%).
  • Comparisons by sex, academic classification, and college showed no meaningful differences.