March 5, 2012



NACADA to host webcast Tuesday

By Michael Lynch

Academic advising, particularly with the advent of the National Academic Advising Association — or NACADA — in 1977, has assumed an increasingly significant role in higher education in terms of retention, graduation and transfer rates (Tricoli, 2009). Whatever method of advising is employed by the institution of higher education, the goal remains essentially the same: to provide a structured relationship wherein students can satisfy all academic requisites, maintain the necessary cumulative average, fulfill athletic and scholarship requirements, properly prepare for graduate school mandates, and graduate in a timely fashion.

At the same time, many in the academy express concern regarding the legal implications of erroneous guidance given a student, which hampers his or her ability to comply with these objectives. Unquestionably, education at every level operates within anincreasingly complex arena of national and local regulations.

Audrey Wolfson Latourette, who has a law degree, will join Thomas Grites, NACADA past president, in the Advisor Connect platform to discuss the potential legal implications of academic advising. They will review the posture of the courts with respect to intervention in both the public and private college and university context, share an analysis of a variety of legal theories employed by students to enforce statements issued by academic advisers or other representatives of the university, and share strategies to limit individuals' and institutions' potential liabilities.

Participate in this next webcast at 1 p.m. Tuesday in Room 213 of the K-State Student Union.