Handheld Wind Speed Sensing Device
Reference Number: 13-18
Inventors: Joel Cranmer, Derek Damas, Brandon Henderson, Kyle Welch, Justin Werner and Mark Wheeler
Description:

Although measuring wind speed is a practice dating from the 15th century, the methods and devices used over time have evolved, enabling more accurate readings. Today, there are different types of devices that essentially provide the same results: Sonic, windmill, hotwire, cup and laser. Several of these devices have been adapted to manageable sizes; however, there are many situations in which a handheld anemometer is the preferred solution for airflow measurement. These handheld devices typically incorporate sensors that contain a rotatable vane that is mounted within a circular protective ring. Although these devices are currently broadly used, their design provides several distinct drawbacks, such as:

  • A need for overcoming the inertia of the rotating vane
  • Sensor insensitivity to small airflows 
  • Vulnerability to deformation on rough handling or shock
  • Vulnerability to wear, degradation and water

With these limitations in mind, Kansas State University researchers have developed a new compact handheld device for determining wind speed. The device contains no moving parts and is both rugged and waterproof. This device addresses most of the drawbacks of other devices and provides accurate readings across a broad range of wind speeds and in adverse conditions.

Advantage:
  • Portable handheld device with no moving parts
  • Very durable
  • Water-resistant
  • Can operate at temperatures between -15 and +70 degrees Celsius
  • Tested in a wind tunnel to determine wind speed in the range of 5 to 75 mph, ±2 mph
  • Can send signals to an external device
Applications:
  • Durable and waterproof handheld anemometer that can be used in different fields, from meteorology to outdoors sports and activities.
Patent Status
  • Provisional patent application filed in May 2013.

Kansas State University Research Foundation seeks to have discussions with companies that are interested in licensing and/or research collaborations.

Interested parties should contact:

Kansas State University Institute for Commercialization (KSU-IC)
2005 Research Park Circle Manhattan, KS 66502
Tel: 785-532-3900 Fax: 785-532-3909
E-Mail: ic@k-state.edu