Frequently Asked Questions

General

1. Where can individuals find contact information for the Office of Student Financial aid (OSFA)?

Please contact OSFA to find out more.

2. What kinds of financial aid can students apply for at K-State?

There are five types of financial aid: scholarships, grants, loans, work-study funding, and waivers. Students can apply for grants, loans, and work-study funding by completing and submitting the FAFSA. To apply for K-State scholarships, students must complete the K-State scholarship application.

3. How much financial aid can students receive from scholarships, grants, work-study funding, and loans?

Generally, students will not know how much financial aid the OSFA may be able to offer to them until they have been accepted for admission by the university and completed both the FAFSA and the K-State scholarship application. Premised on data you submit on the FAFSA and the Scholarship Application in conjunction with federal, state, and institutional eligibility criteria, the OSFA will prepare a financial aid offer that may include a mix of scholarship, grant, work, and loan offers. We encourage you to check out the Scholarships, Grants, Jobs, and Loans sections on this website for additional details.

4. How does the OSFA let me know of my financial aid processing status?

The most convenient method for checking on the status of your financial aid for a given academic year is to review your information within university’s student information system, iSIS. From the iSIS Student Center you will be able to view your aid awards, our estimated cost of attendance for you, our requests for you to provide additional information when needed, and much more.

Scholarships

1. What types of scholarships are available?

K-State offers wide variety of merit based scholarships. Merit refers to a student’s past academic, leadership, or civic accomplishments. We encourage you to check out the Scholarships section on this website for additional details such as priority dates and application procedure.

2. I will be receiving a non-K-State, private scholarship. Will this affect my financial aid?

Please notify the OSFA as soon as you learn that you will receive any private scholarships or funding. Private funding may affect your eligibility for financial aid, especially your eligibility for federal loans.

3. How are non-K-State, private scholarships processed?

Most private scholarship donors send scholarship checks to K-State. If you receive a private scholarship check directly from a scholarship donor, please endorse it and write your full name and Wildcat ID number on the front of the check. Then mail or deliver the check to the OSFA. The university will then apply the scholarship against your university account where it will reduce your university charges and/or result in an excess financial aid credit that will be forwarded to you.

Applying for financial aid

1. How do I apply for financial aid?

For most types of grants, work study, and loans offered at K-State, students and their families must complete the Free Application for Federal Student aid (FAFSA). The most efficient and accurate method for a student to complete this federal application is to do so online. Due to limited funding for certain financial aid programs, the OSFA encourages all students to apply by March 1 prior to the start of a new academic year. (For example, March 1, 2013 is the priority date for the 2013-2014 academic year that starts in August of 2013.) To be confident that the results of the submitted FAFSA are forwarded to the OSFA at K-State, filers of the FAFSA should be sure to list K-State's federal school code of 001928 on the FAFSA.

2. Why does K-State have a FAFSA priority date?

Due to limited funding for certain aid programs, the OSFA encourages all individuals to apply by March 1 prior to the start of a new academic year. (For example, March 1, 2013 is the priority date for the 2013-2014 academic year that starts in August of 2013.) Filing your FAFSA after the priority date will, however, not affect your eligibility considerations for certain federal aid programs such as Federal Pell Grant or Federal Direct Student Loans. Even in instances where a student and/or family have not yet filed their federal taxes, the OSFA encourages individuals to apply by the March 1 priority date. In such instances the student and his/her parent may be obligated to update their FAFSA after federal taxes have been filed – but the priority date will have been successfully locked in with the initial ‘estimated tax’ application.

3. Why do I need a Federal PIN to file a FAFSA?

You, and at least one parent if you are a dependent, will need a personal identification number to electronically sign your FAFSA. Your financial aid PIN is just like the PIN you get from your bank. It is confidential and should not be shared with anyone, even if someone else completes your FAFSA for you. Students and parents of dependent students are encouraged to apply for a PIN if they have not already done so.

4. My parent(s) have more than one student in college. Is a separate parent PIN needed for each student?

Your parent can use the same PIN to sign multiple electronic FAFSA applications. A separate FAFSA must, however, be filed for each student in the household.

5. Can students and/or parents estimate tax information on the FAFSA if they have not yet filed their federal taxes before the K-State FAFSA priority date?

Yes, you, and if applicable, your parents, can provide estimated federal tax data if federal taxes have not yet been filed in order to meet K-State’s March 1 FAFSA Priority filing date. However, you will be obligated to make a correction to your original FAFSA information once federal taxes have been filed. Except for very limited circumstances, the OSFA recommends that federal tax filers utilize the IRS Data Retrieval Process embedded within the FAFSA for accuracy and convenience.

6. Do all students need to report parent information on the FAFSA?

The FAFSA contains a series of questions which will determine if you are considered to be a “dependent” student for financial aid purposes. The OSFA encourages you to carefully review this series of questions when completing the FAFSA on-line. If it is determined that you are considered to be a dependent student, the FAFSA application will indicate that a parental section will need to be completed by your parent before the application can be successfully submitted.

7. I just received my Student Aid Report (SAR). What do I do with it?

This report is sent to you by the federal government. It summarizes the data you reported on your FAFSA and displays your EFC. Carefully review your SAR for accuracy. If you find that you need to make corrections, you can do so by logging back into your online FAFSA, making the needed corrections, and re-submitting the application.

8. What does EFC stand for?

EFC stands for Expected Family Contribution. The federal processor calculates this index number based on the information you provide on your FAFSA. The EFC will be displayed on your Student Aid Report (SAR). The EFC allows financial aid professionals to determine a student’s financial need. To determine need the EFC is subtracted from a student’s Cost of Attendance.

Award Notification

1. When does the OSFA begin sending out financial aid award notifications?

The first award notifications are typically sent out by April 1 for the next academic year which begins with the fall term. Notifications to new, incoming students typically take the form of paper award notices sent to a student’s permanent address. Continuing students typically receive their award notification via an email communication sent to their K-State e-mail address. All students are asked to respond to their financial aid offers by logging into the university’s student information system, iSIS. Note: Your award notification may be delayed if you did not complete the FAFSA by the March 1 priority date, you were selected for verification, or our office encountered a differing eligibility issue.

2. I just received my financial aid award notification e-mail or letter. What do I do now?

Irrespective of whether you received your financial aid award notification by e-mail or letter, you will need to log into K-State’s student information system, iSIS to respond to your award offers. In addition, you may also be asked to provide information in regard to your enrollment plans and whether you anticipate receiving any non-university forms of aid. K-State’s online acceptance process will also allow you to review a number of your rights and responsibilities as a financial aid recipient.

3. I still haven't received an award notification and it’s after April 1st. Why?
There are three primary reasons why you may have not have received an award notification.
(1) Your financial aid application is not complete. Often the OSFA will request additional information before eligibility for differing forms of aid can be established. Fortunately, checking whether you need to provide any additional information to the OSFA is easy. Simply log in to your Student Center within the university’s student information system, iSIS. The OSFA posts any requests for any additional information required from you under the To Do List within your Student Center in iSIS.
(2) K-State did not receive your FAFSA information. Often a student will neglect to provide K-State’s federal school code on his or her FAFSA. Unless your FAFSA has K-State’s federal school code of 001928 listed, the OSFA will not receive your FAFSA information. Fortunately, if you have already filed your FAFSA adding K-State’s federal school code is easy, simply make a correction to your on-line FAFSA application and resubmit it.
(3) You have not been admitted to a degree-seeking program at K-State. Students who have not been admitted to a degree-seeking program at K-State are generally not awarded any federal, state, or institutional aid.

Transfer and Non-Traditional Students

1. I'm planning to transfer to K-State. How do I apply for financial aid at K-State?

For most types of grants, work study, and loans offered at K-State, transfer and non-traditional students are encouraged to complete the Free Application for Federal Student aid (FAFSA). The most efficient and accurate method for a student to complete the FAFSA is to do so online. Note: If you have already completed the FAFSA please be sure to verify that you listed K-State as a school to receive your information. If you find that you had not previously listed K-State you will need to add K-State’s school code of 001928 to your FAFSA application and resubmit it.

2. What scholarships are available for undergraduate transfer students?

 If you will be an undergraduate transfer student, we encourage you to review our Transfer scholarship checklist to familiarize yourself on what types of transfer scholarships we offer and how to apply.

3. What scholarships are available for non-traditional students?
If you are a non-traditional student, please do the following:
Submit the K-State scholarship application by February 1 of the preceding academic year. Adult non-traditional undergraduates should also submit typed information that includes address, Social Security Number, student status (full or part-time), and one paragraph each describing:
(1) your career goals and plans,
(2) your financial need, and
(3) your unique circumstance to Non-traditional Student Services, Kansas State University, 101 Holton Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506-1305, by February 1 of the preceding academic year.
4. As a transfer student do I have to be admitted to K-State before I can receive a financial aid offer?

Yes, you must be admitted into a degree program. Your FAFSA can be processed once the Office of Undergraduate Admissions has notified you that you have been admitted to K-State.

5. Since I'm transferring, how can I be sure that my financial aid will be available in time to start classes?

As you can imagine, much will depend on how soon you applied for both admission and federal student aid. We encourage transfer students to apply four to five months before attending K-State. Consequently, we encourage you to review our financial aid process and contact us if you encounter challenges along the way.

Federal Work-Study funding

1. What is Federal Work-Study funding?

Federal Work-Study funding helps you offset some of the typical costs associated with going to college by allowing you to work part-time on campus. Typical work-study awards range from $800 to $2,500. Most jobs are on campus and pay by the hour. We encourage you to check out the Employment section on this website for additional Federal Work-Study details.

2. How do I get Federal Work-Study funding?

Consideration for Federal Work-Study funding is given to students who demonstrate significant financial need and meet K-State's March 1 priority date for submitting the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Students must indicate on the FAFSA that they are interested in work-study funding as part of their financial aid package.

3. How do I find a Federal Work-Study job?

If you have accepted a Federal Work-Study offer from the OSFA, we encourage you to check out K-State’s the part-time job list which includes an up-to-date listing of part-time job opportunities including Federal Work-Study funded jobs.

Loans

1. What is a Federal Direct Parent PLUS Loan?

A Federal Direct Parent PLUS Loan is a low-interest, unsubsidized federal loan that allows a parent of a dependent student to assist in paying for the student's college education. If a student accepts an offered Parent PLUS Loan as part of his/her financial aid package, the OSFA will request additional information to be submitted by the student’s parent, since the parent is the actual borrower of a Federal Direct PLUS Loan. We encourage you to check out the Loans section on this website for additional details.

2. Where is a Federal Direct Parent PLUS Loan sent?

The federal government sends the loan proceeds of a Federal Direct Parent PLUS Loan directly to K-State where it is applied against applicable student charges such as tuition and fees.  If the parent borrower has provided authorization, any residual amount of the loan is forwarded to the student as a student aid credit balance. If the parent borrower has not provided authorization, any residual amount of the loan is forwarded by the university to parent borrower.

3. Besides federal student loans are there any other student loans available?

Various lending institutions offer private, alternative student loans. The OSFA encourages all students at K-State to apply for all available federal student loans before applying for a private loan. Typically, the terms and conditions of private loans are less attractive for the student borrower than their federal counter parts.

Verification

1. What is verification?

Verification is a process that ensures that the information you and your family reported on your FAFSA is accurate. As part of this process, the OSFA may ask the student and his/her family to provide additional information. Individuals are typically selected for verification by the federal processor of the FAFSA. The OSFA also reserves the right to select individuals for the verification process under certain conditions such as when a student submits a Professional Judgment Appeal. We encourage you to review our Verification section on this website.

2. What happens if I'm selected for verification?

If you are selected for verification the OSFA is likely to request that you take certain corrective actions on you FAFSA and/or provide the office with additional information. You will be able to see these requests within your Student Center in the university’s student information system, iSIS. Specifically, we ask you to review and respond to item listed under the To Do List area within your Student Center.

Special circumstances

1. How can students and families notify the OSFA that their financial situation is not accurately reflected in the data submitted as part of the FAFSA?

The OSFA at Kansas State University recognizes that a family’s financial circumstances may not be adequately reflected in the information provided on the FAFSA. If you have reason to believe that this situation applies to you and your family, we invite you to file a Professional Judgment Appeal along with supporting documentation with the OSFA. K-State’s financial aid advisors are authorized to make data adjustments, on a case-by-case basis, after reviewing a Professional Judgment Appeal. Such adjustments may allow a student to become eligible for additional forms of student aid.

2. I live on my own. Why am I not considered independent from my parents for financial aid purposes?

Not living with your parents doesn't automatically classify you as independent student. Independent status is determined by the federal government based on a variety of factors such as your age, the degree you will be pursuing, your marital status, your veteran status, etc.. In very rare circumstances such as where the OSFA can document an abusive relationship between parents and students, the OSFA has the authority to make an otherwise dependent student independent for financial aid purposes. Please contact our office if you have questions.

3. I'm thinking of dropping a class. Will this affect my financial aid?

Current and future financial aid eligibility can be affected by dropping credit hours once the term has begun. As part of monitoring each student’s Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP), the OSFA tracks the number of attempted vs. completed credit hours. We encourage you to review our SAP policy or contact our office before dropping courses during any given term.

4. I'm thinking of dropping all my classes. How might I be affected by withdrawing from the university?

In addition to affecting you from a SAP perspective, the OSFA is obligated to perform a Return to Title IV calculation for any student who received federal student aid. You may be affected by such a calculation, since it determines how much, if any, of the federal aid you may already have received will need to be returned to the federal government. We encourage you to review our Withdrawing from K-State policy or contact our office before dropping all your term courses (withdrawing).