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Developing Scholars

Frequently Asked Questions

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Who should apply?
Why should I choose this program?
What does research really mean?
How long can I be in the program?
What if I want to stay in the program after my three years?
What if I choose not to continue with the program?
Do I have to take seminar, and does it count toward graduation?
How much of a time commitment is required?

Who should apply?

Any undergraduate student who is first generation of any background or who is a member of a group that has been historically underrepresented in higher education. Students who do not fit this profile are invited to consider the OURCI Grants program for possible research matches or view the OURCI Clearinghouse for research projects.  All undergraduate students in pursuit of undergraduate research placement are welcome to visit one-on-one with OURCI staff for further guidance.

Why should I choose this program?

DSP provides you with insight into your field of study in a way few entering students experience. It will give you an early peek at the rewards and frustrations of research in your field. You will have the chance to meet other students and faculty in your discipline. Gaining skills, knowledge, and practical experience will enhance your understanding of what happens in the classroom. We hope that DSP will open more windows of understanding and doors of opportunity as you head for graduate or professional schools or into a placement in your profession.

What does research really mean?

The field of research encompasses a broad expanse of interests. Past research projects range from anatomy to art, from biology to business, entomology to education, and everything in between. Research means investigative exploration and a chance to be part of cutting-edge discovery.

How long can I be in the program?

Students are admitted into this program as early as their freshman year and can reapply for a second and third year.

What if I want to stay in the program after my three years?

Some students may be employed as peer assistants after completing DSP. By your fourth year, it is likely you will be busy with internships, interviews, and graduation. While you should be ready to move on, we hope you will keep in touch, seek guidance, and share news about your progress with us even after your time in DSP.

What if I choose not to continue with the program?

This program is an opportunity which lays a very strong foundation for your educational career at K-State and beyond. You get to work with the faculty in any field of your interest.

Our DSP students have acknowledged that this experience has been very inspiring and enlightening, helping them move in the direction of their future goals. However, if you are having doubts, make an appointment to meet with Ms. Cortez, and she will listen and help you weigh the options so that you make the best choice for you.

Do I have to take seminar, and does it count toward graduation?

Yes, to both. DSP seminar is a 1-credit hour course that meets once a week each semester of your first year. You enroll in the credits just like any other course, and it counts as elective credit toward graduation.

How much of a time commitment is required?

It is expected that you will put forth an average of six to ten hours of serious research per week. This may include meetings with your mentor, literature searches, conducting experiments, studying and analyzing results, writing about your findings, and other appropriate activities.

Alumna Spotlight

Fulbright Scholar

Ariel Anib

Ariel Anib (Olathe,KS), graduated 2012:Ariel received numerous honors and awards while a Developing Scholar at K-State.  She was DSP’s first Fulbright Scholar.  The Fulbright Program, describes itself as “the flagship international educational exchange program sponsored by the U.S. government, is designed to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of other countries.”  Ariel taught English in Guanajuato, Mexico and toured much of the country.   While at K-State, she received the Dean of Student Life Outstanding Graduating Senior Award, and the Pat J. Bosco Outstanding Graduating Senior for the School of Leadership Studies.  She was a Truman Scholarship semi-finalist, a recipient of the Commerce Bank Award for Enhancing Multiculturalism, a K-State PROUD Hero award recipient, and won the inaugural Wildcat Peace Award.  She was a member of Phi Beta Kappa honorary, as well as Phi Kappa Phi.  Ariel is currently teaching Spanish at Raytown High School in Raytown, Missouri.