Kimberly Kirkpatrick

kirkpatrickContact Information

Office: BH 413

Phone: 532-0805

E-mail: kirkpatr@ksu.edu

Reward, Timing, & Decision Lab

Research Interests

I received my Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Iowa in 1995 under the supervision of Professor Edward A. Wasserman. My dissertation examined the role of spatial and feature-based information in pigeon visual perception. I then moved to Brown University in 1996, where I worked as a Post-doctoral fellow with Professor Russell M. Church examining the role of timing processes in classical conditioning paradigms. My research was funded in part by an NRSA from the NIH during this time. After leaving Brown in 2000, I established the York Timing Laboratory at the University of York, UK, where I spend 8 years as a faculty member. I moved from York to Kansas State in 2008 where I established the Reward, Timing and Decision (RTD) laboratory.

The main line of research in my laboratory is the role of timing and reward processes in determining impulsive and risky choice in rats. This research is progressing along a number of different routes including examining interactions between timing and reward processing, examining the effect of pharmacological interventions on timing and choice behavior, and assessing the role of reward processing neural substrates such as the nucleus accumbens core in timing and choice paradigms. We are also conducting some investigations of strain-related differences in discounting paradigms to determine the source of differences in levels of impulsivity among different strains of rats, and looking at the effects of environmental enrichment on reward processing and decision making. In 2010, I received an RO1 grant from the NIMH to investigate targeted therapeutic interventions to treat impulsivity in our rat model. We are currently working on developing this line of research into a translational environment for application to targeted human populations. We are also working on developing a neurocomputational model of timing, reward processing and temporal discounting.

Student Involvement

Undergraduate and graduate students working in my laboratory are involved in all aspects of the research process. Depending upon the students’ interest, they can learn neurobiological techniques such as injections, histology, and stereotaxic surgery in addition to obtaining a strong grounding in behavioral analysis. Students will learn how to design projects, analyze data, write computer programs, and will be given the opportunity to contribute to the publication of the results and the writing of grants for funding of the research. Students are also encouraged to attend scientific meetings to present their research. I am open to supervising a multitude of possible projects that relate to the general areas described above and am also interested in developing new ideas based on the interests of potential students. In general, graduate students are funded on research assistantships with federal grants when money is available or through departmental graduate teaching assistantships. I can be contacted by e-mail (kirkpatr@ksu.edu) or telephone (785-532-0805) by students who are interested in conducting research in my laboratory.

Current Post-doctoral Fellows

Dr. Jennifer Peterson

Current Graduate Students

Andrew Marshall

James Provost

Catherine Hill

Grant Funding (last 5 years)

  • National Institutes of Mental Health, Timing, reward processing, and choice, $1.3M, 2010-2015
  • Kansas State University, University Research Small Grant, Differential rearing effects on novelty-seeking, impulsive action, and impulsive choice, $4000, 2010
  • National Science Foundation, ADVANCE Distinguished Lecture Series, $1200, 2009
  • Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (UK), International Scientific Interchange Scheme, Neurobiology of timing and reward value, £3000, 2007
  • The Leverhulme Trust, Study Abroad Fellowship, The neurobiology of time perception, £11,000, 2007
  • Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (UK), PI on Project Grant, Reward value effects on reward timing, £311,000, 2007-2009
  • Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (UK), PI on Project Grant, The role of the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala in the acquisition of timing: neural and psychological processes, £186,000, 2005-2008

Recent Publications (*indicates student co-author)

  • *Wilkinson, A., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2011). Tracking and capture of constant and varying velocity stimuli: a cross-species comparison of pigeons and humans. Animal Cognition14, 59-71.
  • Galtress, T., *Marshall, A. T., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2012). Motivation and timing: Clues for modeling the reward system. Behavioural Processes90, 142-153.
  • Galtress, T., *Garcia, A., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2012). Individual differences in impulsive choice and timing in rats. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior98, 65-87.
  • *Garcia, A., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2013). Impulsive choice behavior in four strains of rats: Evaluation of possible models of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. Behavioural Brain Research, 238, 10-22.
  • *Marshall, A. T., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2013). The effects of the previous outcome on probabilistic choice in rats. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes, 39, 24-38.
  • Kirkpatrick, K., *Marshall, A. T., *Clarke, J., & Cain, M. E. (2013). Environmental rearing effects on impulsivity and reward sensitivity. Behavioral Neuroscience, 127, 712-724.
  • Kirkpatrick, K. (2013). Data mining and neurocomputational modeling in the neurosciences. In M. L. Rice (Ed.), The Merrill Series on The Research Mission of Public Universities (pp. 81-89). Lawrence, KS: The University of Kansas Merrill Advanced Studies Center.
  • Kirkpatrick, K. (2014). Interactions of timing and prediction error learning. Behavioural Processes, 101, 135-145.
  • Kirkpatrick, K., *Bilton, T., Hansen, B. C., & Loschky, L. C. (2014). Scene gist categorization by pigeons. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Learning and Cognition, 40, 162-177.
  • Kirkpatrick, K., *Marshall, A. T., *Smith, A., Koci, J., & Park, Y. (2014). Individual differences in impulsive and risky choice: Effects of environmental rearing conditions. Behavioural Brain Research, 269, 115-127.
  • *Marshall, A. T., *Smith, A. P., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2014). Mechanisms of impulsive choice: I. Individual differences in interval timing and reward processing. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 102, 86-101.

Recent Conference Presentations (*indicates student co-author)

  • *Garcia, A., *Vilardo, M., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2011). Factors influencing impulsive choice behavior in different strains of rats. Spring Meeting of the International Conference on Comparative Cognition, Melbourne, FL.
  • *Marshall, A., *Clarke, J., *Crumer, A., Cain, M., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2011).Differential rearing environment effects on impulsive action and impulsive choice in rats. Spring Meeting of the International Conference on Comparative Cognition, Melbourne, FL.
  • Galtress, T., *Crumer, A., *Garcia, A., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2011). Individual differences in impulsive choice behavior. Spring Meeting of the International Conference on Comparative Cognition, Melbourne, FL.
  • Galtress, T., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2011). The effect of changes in motivational state on timing. Annual Meeting of the Society for the Quantitative Analyses of Behavior, Denver, CO.
  • Garcia, A., *Crumer, A., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2011). Individual differences in impulsive choice behavior in different strains of rats. Annual Meeting of the Society for the Quantitative Analyses of Behavior, Denver, CO.
  • *Marshall, A., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2011). Probabilistic choice in rats. Fall meeting of the International Conference on Comparative Cognition, Seattle, WA.
  • Galtress, T., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2011). Individual differences in delay discounting. Fall meeting of the International Conference on Comparative Cognition, Seattle, WA.
  • Kirpatrick, K., *Clarke, J., & Cain, M. E. (2011). Environmental enrichment effects on reward sensitivity. Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Seattle, WA.
  • *Marshall, A., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2012). Previous outcome effects on sequential probabilistic choice behavior. Oklahoma/Kansas Judgement and Decision Making Group Workshop, Manhattan, KS.
  • Galtress, T., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2012). A rat model of impulsive choice behavior: Reward-related correlates of performance. Oklahoma/Kansas Judgement and Decision Making Group Workshop, Manhattan, KS.
  • *Marshall, A., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2012). Modeling sequential choices in a risky choice task. Annual Meeting of the Society for the Quantitative Analyses of Behavior, Seattle, WA.
  • *Vildardo, M., *Katz, B., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2012). A rodent model for detection of oxygen based explosives and propellants. Annual Meeting of the Society for the Quantitative Analyses of Behavior, Seattle, WA.
  • *Smith, A., Galtress, T., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2012). Predictors of impulsive choice behavior. Annual Meeting of the Society for the Quantitative Analyses of Behavior, Seattle, WA.
  • Galtress, T., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2012). Timing, reward discrimination, and impulsive choice behavior. Annual Meeting of the Society for the Quantitative Analyses of Behavior, Seattle, WA.
  • Galtress, T., *Smith, A., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2012). DRL intervention effects on an impulsive choice task. Fall Meeting of the International Conference on Comparative Cognition, New Orleans, LA.
  • *Marshall, A., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2012). Reward magnitude effects on sequential risky choices in rats. Fall Meeting of the International Conference on Comparative Cognition, New Orleans, LA.
  • Kirkpatrick, K. (2012). Adventures in data mining. Fall Meeting of the International Conference on Comparative Cognition, New Orleans, LA.
  • *Marshall, A., Galtress, T., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2013). Impulsive choice mechanisms: A reductionist approach. Society for the Quantitative Analyses of Behavior, Minneapolis, MN.
  • *Smith, A., Galtress, T., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2013). Reward contrast effects on timing and impulsive choice behavior. Society for the Quantitative Analyses of Behavior, Minneapolis, MN.
  • *Hyder, J., *Marshall, A., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2013). The effects of relative gains and losses on probabilistic choice in rats. Society for the Quantitative Analyses of Behavior, Minneapolis, MN.
  • *Marshall, A., *Hyder, J., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2013). Probabilistic choice in rats: the effects of differential losses and alternative outcomes. Fall Meeting of the International Conference on Comparative Cognition, Toronto, Canada.
  • *Smith, A., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2013). Delay exposure as a potential mechanism to increase self-control in rats. Fall Meeting of the International Conference on Comparative Cognition, Toronto, Canada.
  • Kirkpatrick, K. (2013). Measurement of delay discounting: methodological issues. Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Toronto, Canada.
  • *Hill, C., Peterson, J. R., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2014). Measurement of impulsive choice in rats: I. Preliminary assessment. Spring Meeting of the International Conference on Comparative Cognition, Melbourne, FL.
  • *Marshall, A. T., *Fardette, E., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2014). The effects of certain outcome magnitude on probabilistic choice in rats. Spring Meeting of the International Conference on Comparative Cognition, Melbourne, FL.
  • Peterson, J. R., *Hill, C., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2014). Measurement of impulsive choice in rats: II. Test-retest reliability. Spring Meeting of the International Conference on Comparative Cognition, Melbourne, FL.
  • *Wang, Z., *Marshall, A. T., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2014). Environmental rearing effects on behavioral flexibility. Spring Meeting of the International Conference on Comparative Cognition, Melbourne, FL.
  • *Marshall, A. T., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2014). Mechanisms of impulsive choice: reward sensitivity and devaluation. Society for the Quantitative Analyses of Behavior, Chicago, IL.

Recent Invited Talks (*indicates student co-author)

  • Kirkpatrick, K. (2011). Individual differences in impulsivity. Invited address at the 25th Annual Meeting of the Texas Applied Behavior Analysis Association, Galveston, TX.
  • Kirkpatrick, K. (2011). Reward processing, timing, and impulsivity. Invited symposium contribution at the Annual Meeting of the Southwestern Psychological Association, San Antonio, TX.
  • Kirkpatrick, K., & Galtress, T. (2011). Motivation and timing. Invited talk at the Annual Meeting of the Society for the Quantitative Analyses of Behavior, Denver, CO.
  • *Marshall, A., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2012). Analysis of interval timing in two discounting procedures. Invited symposium contribution at the 38thannual meeting of Association for Behavior Analysis International, Seattle, WA.
  • Kirkpatrick., K., *Sears, T., Hansen, B., & Loschky, L. (2012). Factors influencing scene gist categorization by pigeons. Invited symposium contribution at the 38th Annual Meeting of Association for Behavior Analysis International, Seattle, WA.
  • Kirkpatrick, K. & *Vilardo, M. (2012). Olfactory discrimination of oxygen based explosives and propellants by rats. Invited talk at the Pavlovian Society, Jersey City, NJ.
  • Kirkpatrick, K. (2013). Environmental rearing effects on decision making. Invited symposium contribution at the Eastern Psychological Association, New York, NY.
  • Kirkpatrick, K. (2013). Data mining and neurocomputational modeling in the neurosciences. Invited talk at the Merrill Center for Advanced Studies Annual Retreat, Nebraska City, NE.
  • Kirkpatrick, K. (2013). Differential rearing effects on impulsivity. Invited symposium contribution at the Applied Behavioral Analysis International meeting. Merida, Mexico.
  • Kirkpatrick, K., & *Marshall, A. T. (2014). Why is time so powerful? Invited symposium contribution at the Spring Meeting of the International Conference on Comparative Cognition, Melbourne, FL.
  • Kirkpatrick, K. (2014). Individual differences in impulsive and risky choice. Invited address presented at the Meeting on Addictions, Mexico City, MX.

Additional information and publications