Tiffany Galtress

Tiffany GaltressContact Information

Office: BH 533

Phone: 532-0623

E-mail: galt@k-state.edu

Research Interests

I received my BSc in Psychology from the University of York, U.K. in 2001 and between 2002 and 2003 worked as a research assistant for Dr Pam Blundell on a BBSRC funded grant investigating the neural basis of reward representation. I then embarked on a BBSRC funded PhD investigating the mechanisms of reward value, timing and choice under the supervision of Dr Kim Kirkpatrick which I obtained in 2007. My PhD work formed the basis of a three-year BBSRC research grant on reward value effects and reward timing awarded to Dr Kirkpatrick in 2007 on which I worked as a named Post-doctoral associate. In 2010 I moved from York to Kansas State to continue working with Dr Kirkpatrick as a named Post-doctoral fellow on a current five-year NIMH funded grant investigating timing, reward processing and choice.

I have investigated the contribution of the orbitofrontal cortex, the basolateral amygdala and the nucleus accumbens core in reward processing and representation and have conducted pharmacological research into the effect of the neurotransmitter dopamine on timing and choice behavior. I am interested in the interaction between reward value and reward delay in timing paradigms and temporal discounting tasks and my current research investigates how individual sensitivity to reward value and delay affects choice behavior. We anticipate that this line of research will be a factor in the development of therapeutic techniques for the treatment of impulsive choice disorders in humans and also contribute to the development of a  neurocomputational model of timing, reward processing and temporal discounting.

Grant Funding

  • National Institutes of Mental Health, Timing, reward processing, and choice, $875,000, 2010-2015. Named Researcher; Dr K. Kirkpatrick P.I.
  • Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (UK), Reward value effects on reward timing, £311,000, 2007-2009. Named Researcher; Dr K. Kirkpatrick P.I.

Publications

  • Blair, C.A.J., Blundell, P., Galtress, T., Hall, G., & Killcross, A. S. (2003) Discrimination between outcomes in instrumental learning: Effects of preexposure to the reinforcers. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology,56B, 253-265.
  • Galtress, T., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2009). Reward value effects on timing in the peak procedure. Learning and Motivation, 40, 109-131.
  • Galtress, T., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2010). The role of the nucleus accumbens core in impulsive choice, timing, and reward processing, Behavioral Neuroscience, 124, 26-43.
  • Galtress, T., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2010). Reward magnitude effects on temporal discrimination, Learning and Motivation, 41, 108-124.
  • Galtress, T., Marshall, A., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2012). Motivation and timing: Clues for
     
    modeling the reward system. Behavioural Processes, 90, 142-153.
  • Galtress, T., Garcia, A., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2012). Individual differences in impulsive choice and timing in rats. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 98, 65-87.

Conference Presentations

  • Galtress, T., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2005). Choice as a function of reward magnitude and delay. Associative Learning Symposium, Gregynog, U.K.
  • Galtress, T., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2006). Reward value and reward timing are not independent. International Conference on Comparative Cognition, Melbourne, FL.
  • Galtress, T., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2007). Manipulating reward value modifies the perception of temporal cues. Psychobiology, Windermere, U.K.
  • Pizzo, M., Galtress, T., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2008). Temporal expectation under pre-feeding in the peak procedure. International Conference on Comparative Cognition, Melbourne, FL, USA.
  • Kirkpatrick, K., & Galtress, T. (2008). Changes in reward value systematically alter timing. Invited symposium contribution at the 49th Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Chicago, IL, USA.
  • Galtress, T., Pizzo, M., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2008). Changing the value of food reinforcement retards learning about a shift in the time of delivery. Psychobiology, Windermere, U.K.
  • Galtress, T., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2009). The effect of changes in reward magnitude and delay on impulsive behaviour in the nucleus accumbens core. Psychobiology, Windermere, U.K.
  • Galtress, T., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2009). The effect of increases in reward value on temporal discrimination. International Conference on Comparative Cognition, Melbourne, FL.
  • Galtress, T., Crumer, A., Garcia, A., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2011). Individual differences in impulsive choice behavior. International Conference on Comparative Cognition, Melbourne, FL.
  • Galtress, T., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2011). The effect of changes in motivational state on timing. Society for Quantitative Analyses of Behavior, Denver, CO.
  • Kirkpatrick, K., & Galtress, T. (2011). Motivation and timing. Invited talk at the Annual Meeting of the Society for the Quantitative Analyses of Behavior, Denver, CO.
  • Kirkpatrick, K., & Galtress, T. (2011). Motivation and timing. Invited talk at the Annual Meeting of the Society for the Quantitative Analyses of Behavior, Denver, CO.
  • Galtress, T., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2011). Individual differences in delay discounting. International Conference on Comparative Cognition, Seattle, WA.
  • Galtress, T., & Kirkpatrick, K. (2012). A rat model of impulsive choice: Reward-related correlates of behavior. Oklahoma Kansas Judgment and Decision Making Conference, Manhattan, KS.
  • Galtress, T. & Kirkpatrick, K. (2012) Timing, reward discrimination, and impulsive choice behavior. Meeting of the Society for the Quantitative Analyses of Behavior, Seattle, WA.
  • Smith, A., Galtress, T.& Kirkpatrick, K. (2012) Predictors of impulsive choice behavior. Meeting of the Society for the Quantitative Analyses of Behavior, Seattle, WA. 
     

Teaching

Between 2004 and 2010 I carried out Post-graduate and Post-doctoral teaching as part of the Comparative Cognition module at the University of York. I have presented lectures and seminars on subjects including timing and numerosity in human and non-human animals.

Additional information and publications