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Source: Dr. Douglas McGregor, associate professor, mechanical and nuclear engineering
Director of K-State’s Semiconductor Materials and Radiological Technologies Lab (S.M.A.R.T.)

Audio

RADIO REPORT: 1 Wrap
1 Actuality

You have selected a report on an award-winning gamma ray detector developed by a K-State expert that could be a big benefit to homeland security. The wrap and sound bite follow in 3,2,1. . .

WRAP 1: For years, they said it couldn’t be done, but an expert in K-State’s mechanical and nuclear engineering department has come up with a high-resolution gamma ray detector that would be a great help with homeland security issues. Lanice Thomson reports.

TIME: 59 seconds

SUGGESTED INTRO: KEEPING IT SIMPLE – THAT’S THE KEY TO AN INEXPENSIVE GAMMA RAY DETECTOR INTRODUCED BY K-STATE ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR DOUGLAS MC GREGOR. THE HAND-HELD DEVICE SIMPLY USES A SEMI-CONDUCTOR BLOCK WRAPPED IN TEFLON AND COPPER TAPE. MCGREGOR EXPLAINS HIS UNIT HAS GREAT PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS WHEN IT COMES TO HOMELAND SECURITY. . .

(McGregor :21 "For homeland security purposes, anything that might be harmful to people that would emit gamma rays -- this device would be used to first located if there is a problem. Second identify what those gamma rays are, and third tell you what direction that item would be in so you can find it.")

MCGREGOR SAYS THE DEVICE COULD LOOK FOR CERTAIN RADIATION EMISSIONS THAT MIGHT BE INDICATIVE OF A TERRIST-FORMED TYPE OF DEVICE, SUCH AS A DIRTY BOMB. HE ADDS THAT HIS DEVICE IS A BARGAIN AT LESS THAN $150 PER UNIT -- COMPARED WITH OTHER HIGH-RESOLUTIONS DETECTORS THAT COULD COST UP TO $10,000.

LANICE THOMSON, KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY.

 

Summer 2006