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Kansas State University
128 Dole Hall
Manhattan, KS 66506
785-532-2535
media@k-state.edu
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Back row: U.S. Rep. Todd Tiahrt; Manhattan mayor Tom Phillips; U.S. Sen. Sam Brownback; Kansas Senate Minority Leader Anthony Hensley; U.S. Rep. Dennis Moore; U.S. Sen. Pat Roberts; Kansas House Minority Leader Dennis McKinney; Kansas Lt. Gov. Mark Parkinson; and U.S. Rep. Jerry Moran.

Sitting: Speaker of the Kansas House Melvin Neufeld; Kansas Gov. Kathleen Sebelius; and Kansas Senate President Steve Morris

Tuesday Feb. 26 -- Historic meeting in Roberts' office to discuss the National Bio and Agro-defense Facility. Also present at the meeting was U.S. Rep Nancy Boyda.

 

EDITORIALS

HIGH RANKINGS WELL DESERVED -- Manhattan Mercury -- pdf

STOP THE BICKERING AND BUILD THE BIO LAB -- Kansas City Star -- pdf

FUND NBAF LAB -- Topeka Capital-Journal -- pdf

NBAF POLITICS -- Lawrence Journal World -- pdf

NBAF PERFECT FOR MANHATTAN, K-STATE COMMUNITIES -- K-State Collegian -- pdf

GET MOVING ON KANSAS BIO LAB -- Kansas City Star -- pdf

FIGHT TO BRING NEW BIOLAB TO KSU -- Wichita Eagle -- pdf

 

LETTERS

JUERGEN RICHT LETTER

K-STATE AND THE KBA EXPRESS SERIOUS CONCERNS ABOUT GAO ERRORS (PART 1): On Aug. 4, 2009, Kansas State University and the Kansas Bioscience Authority sent a joint letter to Gene Dodaro, acting comptroller general of the Government Accountability Office, outlining serious concerns about a recent GAO report on the safety of biological research, which contained alarming inaccuracies and hidden agendas.

K-STATE AND THE KBA EXPRESS SERIOUS CONCERNS ABOUT GAO ERRORS (PART 2): On Aug. 24, 2009, Kansas State University and the Kansas Bioscience Authority sent a second joint letter to Gene Dodaro, acting comptroller general of the Government Accountability Office, outlining serious concerns about a recent GAO report on the safety of biological research, which contained alarming inaccuracies and hidden agendas.

 

OPINIONS

NATIONAL BIO AND AGRO-DEFENSE FACILITY COULD BE AMERICA'S CDC FOR ANIMAL HEALTH: Prepared by W. Ron DeHaven, CEO and executive vice president of the American Veterinary Medical Association and a former administrator of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

NBAF IS A PERFECT FIT FOR A COLLEGE TOWN: Prepared by Ralph Richardson, DVM, is dean of the K-State College of Veterinary Medicine.

BRINGING NBAF TO KANSAS WOULD ENABLE COLLABORATION WITH HUGE ANIMAL HEALTH NETWORK ALREADY IN PLACE: Prepared by Daniel C. Richardson, DVM, Dipl. ACVS, Chief Executive Officer, K-State Olathe Innovation Campus, Inc.

K-STATE STUDENTS EXCITED FOR POTENTIAL NBAF OPPORTUNITIES: Prepared by Lydia Peele, Kansas State University senior in mathematics education, Olathe, and student body president.

NBAF IN KANSAS IS COMFORTING NEWS FOR THE FUTURE OF THE NATION'S FOOD SUPPLY: Prepared by Kelly F. Lechtenberg, DVM, Ph.D. Lechtenberg is the president of Midwest Veterinary Services Inc. and Logan Valley Feeders Inc., Oakland, Neb., where he feeds cattle, farms and practices veterinarian medicine.

NBAF BENEFITS MORE THAN SHORT-TERM ECONOMIC GAIN; INCLUDES SHARED ADVANTAGES FOR ALL: Prepared by Mike Apley, associate professor of production medicine/clinical pharmacology at Kansas State University, where he also serves as director of PharmCATS Bioanalytical Services, an analytical service laboratory supporting academic and pharmaceutical industry research.

K-STATE'S BIOSECURITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE WOULD ENABLE RESEARCH PROGRAMS TO TRANSITION FROM PLUM ISLAND WITHOUT DELAY DURING CONSTRUCTION PHASE OF NBAF: Prepared by Beth Montelone, interim director of Kansas State University's Biosecurity Research Institute in Pat Roberts Hall, and Peine professor of biosecurity.

K-STATE'S BIOSECURITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE AND THE NATIONAL BIO AND
AGRO-DEFENSE FACILITY WOULD MAKE POWERFUL RESEARCH TEAM
: Prepared by Juergen A. Richt, Regents Distinguished Professor, K-State College of Veterinary Medicine, and one of the state's first Kansas Bioscience Eminent Scholars.

NBAF IN KANSAS WILL BE SAFE, BIOSECURE: Prepared by Dan Thomson, the Jones Professor of Production Medicine and Epidemiology, associate professor of clinical sciences in the K-State College of Veterinary Medicine, and director of the Beef Cattle Institute.

NBAF IN KANSAS WOULD BE ABLE TO RESPOND MORE RAPIDLY TO ANIMAL HEALTH CHALLENGES: Prepared by Steve Henry, a veterinarian from Abilene who works primarily with hogs. He also is an adjunct professor of diagnostic medicine and pathobiology at Kansas State University's College of Veterinary Medicine and earned his veterinary degree from K-State in 1972.

CELEBRATE KANSAS' SUCCESS WITH NBAF, CONGRATULATE ALL INVOLVED: Linda Weis, chair-elect of the Board of Directors for the Manhattan Area Chamber of Commerce.

CONSIDERING NBAF: Nancy and Jerry Jaax are graduates of K-State's College of Veterinary Medicine and work at K-State. While serving at USAMRIID, they were key participants in the 1989 Reston Ebola outbreak detailed in Richard Preston's best seller "The Hot Zone," which inspired the 1995 film "Outbreak."

PUTTING NATIONAL LABORATORY FOR ANIMAL HEALTH IN MANHATTAN WOULD OPEN DOORS FOR K-STATE STUDENTS WANTING TO DO INNOVATIVE RESEARCH: Lydia Peele is a Kansas State University senior in mathematics education from Olathe and student body president.

NOT HAVING NBAF AT K-STATE WOULD BE A RISK: Mike Apley is an associate professor of production medicine/clinical pharmacology at Kansas State University, where he also serves as director of PharmCATS Bioanalytical Services, an analytical service laboratory supporting academic and pharmaceutical industry research.

PUTTING NBAF IN KANSAS IS VITAL TO NATION'S BIOSECURITY: Kelly F. Lechtenberg, DVM, Ph.D. Lechtenberg is president of Midwest Veterinary Services Inc. and Logan Valley Feeders Inc., both in Oakland, Neb., where he feeds cattle, farms and practices veterinarian medicine.

WHAT IS NBAF AND WHY SHOULD WE WANT IT HERE?: Dan Thomson, MS, Ph.D, DVM, Jones Professor of Production Medicine and Epidemiology, associate professor of clinical sciences in the K-State College of Veterinary Medicine, and director of the Beef Cattle Institute.

NBAF WOULD PROVIDE PROTECTION TO LIVESTOCK INDUSTRIES IN KANSAS AND U.S.: Bob L. Larson, DVM, Ph.D., professor of clinical sciences and the Coleman Chair in Food Animal Production Medicine at Kansas State University. Larson also interim director of K-State's Master of Public Health Program.

A TIP OF THE HAT TO MANHATTAN: Tom Thornton, president and CEO of the Kansas Bioscience Authority.

PUTTING NATIONAL BIO AND AGRO-DEFENSE FACILITY AT K-STATE WILL ADD TO REGIONAL SYNERGY IN THE BIOSCIENCES: Dan Richardson, CEO, K-State Olathe Innovation Campus

K-STATE'S BIOSECURITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE AND THE NATIONAL BIO AND AGRO-DEFENSE FACILITY WOULD MAKE POWERFUL RESEARCH TEAM: Juergen A. Richt, Regents Distinguished Professor, K-State College of Veterinary Medicine, and one of the state's first Kansas Bioscience Eminent Scholars

NBAF WOULD BE A DYNAMIC ADDITION: Linda Weis, chair-elect of the Board of Directors of the Manhattan Area Chamber of Commerce

NBAF WILL ADVANCE ANIMAL HEALTH AND HELP MAKE OUR NATION SAFER: Jeff Levin, Manhattan resident

HIGH TECHNOLOGY AND TRAINING MAKE BIOCONTAINMENT RESEARCH SAFE: Scott Rusk, director of Pat Roberts Hall, home to K-State's Biosecurity Research Institute

BIO-FACILITIES PREPARED FOR EMERGENCIES: Scott Rusk, director of Pat Roberts Hall, home to K-State's Biosecurity Research Institute

K-STATE'S FOCUS ON SAFE AND SECURE FOOD IS LONG-STANDING: Marty Vanier, director of operations for K-State's National Agricultural Biosecurity Center

ANIMAL DISEASE RESEARCH WILL BE SAFELY ACCOMPLISHED IN THE HEARTLAND: Ron Trewyn, K-State vice president for research, and Jerry Jaax, K-State associate vice president for research compliance

THE NBAF WOULD BUILD ON KANSAS' EXISTING STRENGTHS IN BIOSCIENCE: Tom Thornton, president, Kansas Bioscience Authority

NBAF'S LOCATION WILL HAVE REAL IMPLICATIONS FOR ANIMAL DISEASE, ECONOMY: Steve Henry, veterinarian in Abilene who works primarily with hogs and also an adjunct professor of diagnostic medicine and pathobiology at Kansas State University's College of Veterinary Medicine

THE BENEFITS OF BRINGING NBAF TO K-STATE ARE TOO GREAT TO IGNORE: Fred Cholick, dean of K-State's College of Agriculture and director of K-State Research and Extension

BIOCONTAINMENT LABS MAKE AMERICA SAFER: Scott Rusk has been involved in managing biocontainment facilities for more than 20 years. He is the associate director for operations at K-State's Biosecurity Research Institute.

WHAT BETTER PLACE TO PUT NBAF THAN HERE?: Ralph Richardson is dean of Kansas State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine, from which he received his DVM nearly 40 years ago.

LET'S SHOW MANHATTAN IS RIGHT SITE FOR NBAF: Angela Kreps is a KSU graduate. She now lives in Overland Park and is president of KansasBio and is a member of the board of directors of the Kansas Bioscience Authority.

CITIZENS NEED STRAIGHT TALK ON NBAF SAFETY: Nancy and Jerry Jaax are graduates of K-State's College of Veterinary Medicine and work at K-State. While serving at USAMRIID, they were key participants in the 1989 Reston Ebola outbreak detailed in Richard Preston's best seller "The Hot Zone," which inspired the 1995 film "Outbreak."

KANSAS IS PRIMED TO COMPETE FOR NBAF: Pat Roberts, U.S. senator from Kansas