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Kansas State University
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Manhattan, KS 66506
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OH, BY THE WAY...

PUBLIC FORUM FOR DIRECTOR OF ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT CANDIDATES BEGINS APRIL 26
Interviews for a newly created position as director of energy and environment will begin Monday, April 26. A public forum for each candidate will run from Monday to Wednesday. 

The director of energy and environment will be responsible for the development of energy reduction initiatives and tasks for the university. 

Candidates are Donald Gray, Casey Lauer and Blythe Vogt.

Gray will present in a university forum from 10:30-11:30 a.m. Monday, April 26, in the Town Hall of the Leadership Studies Building, room 103.

Lauer's university forum is from 10:30-11:30 a.m. Tuesday, April 27, in the Town Hall of the Leadership Studies Building, room 103.

Vogt will present from 10:30-11:30 a.m. Wednesday, April 28, in the Big 12 Room of the K-State Student Union.

Each candidate's vitae can be viewed online at http://www.k-state.edu/facilities/employment/dee/Resume.html

 

INTERNATIONALLY KNOWN MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS EXPERT CARL BENDER TO GIVE PRESENTATION IN K-STATE'S PETERSON PUBLIC LECTURE SERIES IN PHYSICS
Carl Bender, an internationally known leader in mathematical physics, will be the speaker for the spring 2010 presentation in Kansas State University's Peterson Public Lecture Series in Physics.

Bender's lecture, "In the Complex World Classical Mechanics and Quantum Mechanics are Very Much Alike," will be at 3 p.m. Tuesday, April 27, in Hale Library's Hemisphere Room. The lecture is free and the public is invited. The talk will be presented at an elementary, popular science level.

Bender is the Wilfred R. and Ann Lee Konneker Distinguished Professor of Physics at Washington University in St. Louis, Mo. He specializes in the application of asymptotic analysis, differential-equation theory and complex-variable methods to quantum mechanics and elementary particle physics.

 

K-STATE'S WOMEN IN ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE PROGRAM RECOGNIZED AS BEST IN THE NATION
A Kansas State University program that cultivates the science and technology interests of women from grade school through postgraduate levels is being nationally recognized for excellence.

K-State's Women in Engineering and Science Program, also known as WESP, has received the Women in Engineering Program Award as the nation's outstanding Women in Engineering program. The award, from the Women in Engineering Pro-Active Network, was presented at the network's joint conference with the National Association of Multicultural Engineering Program Advocates, April 12-14, in Baltimore, Md.

The award is presented annually to one outstanding Women in Engineering program that is serving as a model for other institutions. To be considered, the program has to have been in existence for five or more years and have assessment data that shows how the program has made an impact. The honor includes a plaque and opportunity to speak on an experts' panel at the next Women in Engineering Pro-Active Network national conference.

The Women in Engineering and Science Program is a collaborative effort between K-State's colleges of Engineering and Arts and Sciences, according to Kimberly Douglas-Mankin, director.

"WESP designs and implements programs that make K-State a better place for women to pursue their interests in science and engineering," Douglas-Mankin said. "Programming is structured around three purposes: promoting awareness, building community and providing support. While programming is designed to benefit female students in engineering and science, many of the programs offered by the WESP office serve all students. The reality is that the things that make K-State better for women scientists and engineers also make K-State better for everyone."