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Kansas State University

IT Help Desk
Kansas State University
214 Hale Library
Manhattan, KS 66506
785-532-7722
800-865-6143 (toll-free)
helpdesk@k-state.edu
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Samba connectivity

Samba provides a method for accessing UNIX file space as a drive letter mapping from within the Windows, Macintosh, Linux and other operating systems that understand SMB protocol. A common reason for establishing this mapping is to edit web pages hosted on the central UNIX web server. One drawback to a Samba connection is that off-campus ISPs typically block the protocols required to make this connection. Cox Cable is one ISP that blocks this type of access.

Windows

This process is for establishing a Samba connection with Windows 2000 Professional and Windows XP Professional operating systems. Your results may be different based on your system configuration.

Requirements
  • Windows 2000 Professional or Windows XP Professional operating systems.
  • Ethernet connectivity to the K-State campus Ethernet.
  • An account on the central K-State UNIX system with a minimum of read access to UNIX file space.
  • Optional:
    • Read/Write access to a web directory on the central UNIX web server.
    • A Novell NetWare client installed on your work station (if you are connected to a LAN environment).
  • An understanding of drive mappings.
  • Knowledge of local account, LAN account, and UNIX account IDs and passwords.
Process
  1. Turn on the computer, login to your normal computing environment.
  2. Select My Network Places, click the right mouse button to access the options available.
    wpe2.jpg (16676 bytes)
    • Select Map Network Drive
    • NOTE: that if you have a Novell client installed, a second option of Novell Map Network Drive will appear. This is specific to the Novell LAN environment and should not be used for a Samba connection.
  3. A dialog box will appear where you can enter the drive mapping to the UNIX drive space.
    wpe4.jpg (26439 bytes)
    • Web server example: \\samba.ksu.edu\www\directory_name
    • Personal UNIX space example: \\samba.ksu.edu\<eID>
  4. The first available drive letter will be shown in the Drive entry field. Use the down area to select another drive letter.
  5. Enter the path to the UNIX drive space that will be mapped in the Folder entry field. The path should be entered as shown in the example above.
  6. The Reconnect at logon checkbox should be checked if this is a mapping that should be automatically reconnected each time the computer is started. If multiple individuals use the same computer, the drive mapping may be lost as different IDs logon to the system.
  7. Account IDs exist on the Windows 2000 Professional and XP Professional desktops, the Novell LAN client, and the UNIX environment. If the IDs and passwords all match, the drive mapping will occur without requiring reentry of an ID and password. If any of the IDs and passwords are different, each unique pair will have to be entered to establish the drive mapping. It is recommended that all ID and password pairs be kept synchronized to minimize confusion.
  8. Create a short cut to a Web Folder or FTP Site will invoke the Network Places wizard and establish a short cut to Network Places and end the process.
  9. Select Finish to establish the drive mapping. The ID and password will be verified that the account has access and if successful, the drive mapping will be created.
  10. Once finished the drive should be visible as a normal drive letter through the Windows Explorer. Files contained in the directory now can be accessed by any Windows application.
    wpe1.jpg (10659 bytes)
Removal of connection

The connection can be removed by selecting the drive letter in Windows Explorer, click the right mouse button to display the options available and select Disconnect. This will permanently remove the connection to the UNIX file space.

Mac OS X

This guide outlines the process for establishing a Samba connection with Mac OS X operating system. This process will give you access to your home directory allowing for personal web page publishing access or to the WWW directory to access departmental/unit web space areas. You can then drag and drop to transfer files to and from your web space as you would any other folder on your system.

Requirements
  • Mac OS X
  • Ethernet connectivity to the K-State campus Ethernet.
  • An account on the central K-State UNIX system with a minimum of read access to UNIX file space.
  • Optional:
    • Read/Write access to a web directory on the central UNIX web server.
  • An understanding of drive mappings.
  • Knowledge of local account, LAN account, and UNIX account IDs and passwords.
Process
  1. Turn on the computer, login to your normal computing environment.
  2. In Finder , choose "Go" from the menu, then "Connect to Server".
    wpe2.jpg (16676 bytes)
  3. A Connect to Server dialog box will appear where you can enter smb://samba.ksu.edu/www/your_eid in the server address bar, and optionally add it to your favorites using the plus sign. To access the K-State publishing area for college, departmental or unit access enter smb://samba.ksu.edu/www
    wpe4.jpg (26439 bytes)
    • Web server example: smb:\\samba.ksu.edu\www\directory_name
    • Personal UNIX space example: smb:\\samba.ksu.edu\<eID>
  4. Click "Connect" and enter your eID and password when prompted.
Advanced Configuration Options
  1. If you desire, you can add the connection as if it were an external drive to your desktop by going to Finder's "Preferences" and checking the box next to "Connected servers" under "Show these items on the Desktop" in the "General" tab.
    wpe1.jpg (10659 bytes)
  2. You can also auto-load (mount) the web space when your computer turns on by dragging the Samba file from "Favorites" under the "Library" folder (use Finder) to the Login items under your account in System Preferences --> Accounts --> My Account --> Login Items
Removal of connection

The connection can be removed through Finder by selecting the drive, and clicking on the Disconnect button or right click and selecting eject.