Photos from the 1930s and 1940s

Resources for Karen Hesse's Out of the Dust and Christopher Paul Curtis's Bud, Not Buddy

(All captions written by the photographer.)

Hesse: Photos | Resources Curtis: Photos | Resources 1930s: Resources

  1. Walker Evans. Lucille Burroughs, daughter of a cotton sharecropper. Hale County, Alabama (1935 or 1936).
  2. Walker Evans. Lucille Burroughs picking cotton, Hale County, Alabama (1936).
  3. Walker Evans. Floyd Burroughs, cotton sharecropper. Hale County, Alabama (1935 or 1936).
  4. Walker Evans. Allie Mae Burroughs, wife of cotton sharecropper. Hale County, Alabama (1935 or 1936).
  5. Walker Evans. Charles and his father Floyd Burroughs, Alabama cotton sharecropper (1936).
  6. Walker Evans. Squeakie asleep (Othel Lee Burroughs). Son of a Hale County, Alabama cotton sharecropper (1936).
  7. Walker Evans. Front porch of the Burroughs' home. Hale County, Alabama (1935 or 1936).
  8. Walker Evans. Part of the bedroom of Floyd Burroughs' cabin. Hale County, Alabama (1935 or 1936).
  9. Walker Evans. Landowner in Moundville, Alabama (1936).
  10. Walker Evans. Bud Fields with his daughter-in-law and granddaughter. Hale County, Alabama (1935 or 1936).
  11. Walker Evans. Bud Fields, cotton sharecropper. Hale County, Alabama (1935 or 1936).
  12. Arthur Rothstein. Dust piled up around farmhouse. Oklahoma (1936).
  13. Arthur Rothstein. Stock watering hole almost completely covered by shifting topsoil. Cimarron County, Oklahoma (1936).
  14. Dorothea Lange. Carter County, Oklahoma. Abandoned land, exhausted soil (1937).
  15. Dorothea Lange. Children of migrant cotton field workers from Sweetwater, Oklahoma. Eight children in the family. Note the housing. Near Casa Grande project, Arizona (1937).
  16. Dorothea Lange. Migrant family from Oklahoma in Texas. A family of six alongside the road. An example of how they fall between the relief agencies. The father, aged thirty-five, is an intelligent fellow, a painter by trade. Advanced tuberculosis, victim of an occupational disease. Ineligible for WPA (Works Progress Administration), rated as totally disabled. As a state charge under Oklahoma relief standards, the family were told the maximum relief would be seven dollars every two weeks. They lost their home, their furniture, took to the road a year ago and when the photographs were made they were found to be without money, shelter, and without food for the four children (1936).
  17. Dorothea Lange. Family walking on highway, five children. Started from Ioabel, Oklahoma. Bound for Krebs, Oklahoma. Pittsburg County, Oklahoma. In 1936 the father farmed on thirds and fourths at Eagleton, McCurtain County, Oklahoma. Was taken sick with pneumonia and lost farm. Unable to get work on Work Prjects Administration and refused county relief in county of fifteen years residence because of temporary residence in another county after his illness (1938).
  18. Dorothea Lange. Child living in Oklahoma City shacktown (1936).
  19. Dorothea Lange. Toward Los Angeles, California (1937).
  20. Margaret Bourke-White. At the time of the Louisville Flood (1937).
  21. Arthur Rothstein. Hooverville shack with outdoor store. This man obtains seasonal employment in the Yakima and Willamette fruit orchards. Oregon (1936).
  22. Arthur Rothstein. Notice on shacks at Hooverville. Portland, Oregon (1937).
  23. John Vachon. Negro children standing in front of half mile concrete wall, Detroit, Michigan. This wall was built in August 1941, to separate the Negro section from a white housing development going up on the other side (1941).
  24. Arthur S. Siegel. Detroit, Michigan. Riot at the Sojourner Truth homes, a new U.S. federal housing project, caused by white neighbors' attempt to prevent Negro tenants from moving in. White picket line (1942).
  25. Arthur S. Siegel. Detroit, Michigan. Riot at the Sojourner Truth homes, a new U.S. federal housing project, caused by white neighbors' attempt to prevent Negro tenants from moving in. Sign with American flag "We want white tenants in our white community," directly opposite the housing project (1942).
  26. Arthur S. Siegel. Detroit, Michigan. Riot at the Sojourner Truth homes, a new U.S. federal housing project, caused by white neighbors' attempt to prevent Negro tenants from moving in. Police arresting a Negro (1942).
  27. Jack Delano. Chicago, Illinois. Pullman porter at the Union Station (1943).
  28. Jack Delano. Pullman porter making up an upper berth aboard the "Capitol Limited" bound for Chicago, Illinois (1942).
  29. International News Photo. Detroit, Michigan. Police officers removing sit-down strikers from the Yale and Towne Manufacturing plant (1937).
  30. Sheldon Dick. National guardsman with one-pounder, overlooking Chevrolet number nine and number four during strike at Flint, Michigan (1937).
  31. Sheldon Dick. Strikers guarding window entrance to Fisher body plant number three. Flint, Michigan (1937).
  32. Gordon Parks. New York, New York. A trio of musicians from Duke Ellington's orchestra during the early morning broadcast (1943).
  33. Gordon Parks. New York, New York. Tenor saxaphone player with Duke Ellington's orchestra at the Hurricane (1943).


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    This page last updated on Friday, July 30, 2010 .