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Dr. Ryszard Jankowiak

 

University Distinguished Professor

Ancillary Professor - Department of Physics

M.S. (Physics) Adam Mickiewicz University (Poznan, Poland) (1974)
Ph.D. in Condensed Matter Physics, Technical University of Gdańsk (Gdańsk, Poland) (1981)

Email: ryszard@ksu.edu
Office Phone: 785-532-6785
Lab Phone: 785-532-1864
Fax: 785-532-6666

Jankowiak Group

Job Openings for Postdoctoral Students

 

Positions and Employment
1976-80 Assistant and Senior Instructor at Technical University, Institute of Physics, Gdańsk, Poland
1981 Assistant Professor, Technical University, Institute of Physics, Gdańsk, Poland
1981 Visiting Professor, Department of Physics, Camerino University, Camerino, Italy
1981-84 Postdoctoral Fellow (with Professor H. Bässler), Physical Chemistry, Philipps University, Marburg, Germany
1984-85 Associate Professor (Gast Dozent) at Philipps University (Physical Chemistry), Marburg, Germany
1985-87 Postdoctoral Fellow (with Professor Gerald J. Small), Ames Laboratory USDOE, Iowa State University, Ames, IA
1988-89 Associate Scientist, Ames Laboratory USDOE, Iowa State University, Ames, IA
1990-1998 Scientist, Ames Laboratory USDOE, Chemical and Biological Sciences Program, Iowa State University, Ames, IA
1999-2005 Senior Scientist, Ames Laboratory USDOE, Chemical and Biological Sciences Program, Iowa State University, Ames, IA
2002-2005 Adjunct Professor in the Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, IA
2005- Present Professor, Department of Chemistry, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS

 

Research Overview

RESEARCH INTERESTS

Energy and electron transfer in natural and artificial photosynthetic complexes at low temperatures and high pressures; hole-burning spectroscopy and structural disorder in glasses, polymers, and proteins; photovoltaic devices; single photosynthetic complex spectroscopy; chemical carcinogenesis; carcinogen metabolism and DNA damage; monoclonal antibody-hapten interactions; and laser-based bioanalytical spectroscopies.

Current research areas include:

  • Photosynthesis research

We study complex biological systems including photosynthetic reaction centers and photosynthetic antenna pigment complexes of green plants/algae and photosynthetic bacteria using solid-state low temperature (laser-based) spectroscopies, i.e. fluorescence line-narrowing spectroscopy (FLNS), hole-burning spectroscopy (HBS), and single photosynthetic complex spectroscopy (SPCS). The combination of HBS on bulk samples and SPCS is a powerful frequency domain approach for obtaining data that can address a number of issues that are key to understanding excitonic structure and energy transfer dynamics. The long-term goal is to reach a better understanding of the ultrafast solar energy driven primary events of photosynthesis as they occur in higher plants, cyanobacteria, purple bacteria, and green algae and to integrate natural and artificial photosynthetic complexes with molecular photovoltaic devices. A better understanding of the excitation energy transfer (EET) and charge separation (CS) processes taking place in photosynthetic complexes is of great interest, since photosynthetic complexes might offer attractive architectures for a future generation of circuitry in which proteins are organized by a macromolecular scaffold. This type of research is of potential importance for the future design of more efficient solar energy conversion devices.

• R. Jankowiak and G. J. Small, “Hole Burning Spectroscopy: Dynamics of Amorphous Solids at Low Temperatures”, Science, 1987, 237, 618.

• R. Jankowiak et al.,"Spectral Hole Burning Spectroscopy in Amorphous Molecular Solids and Proteins," Chemical Reviews, 1993, 93, 1471.

• R. Jankowiak, M. Reppert, V. Zazubovich, J. Pieper, and T. Reinot, "Site Selective and Single Complex Laser-Based Spectroscopies: A Window on Excited State Electronic Structure, Excitation Energy Transfer, and Electron-Phonon Coupling of Selected Photosynthetic Complexes", Chem. Reviews, 2011, 111, pp. 4546-4598.

  • Cancer research

We are developing clinically useful biomarker-technologies for cancer risk assessment. We use high resolution laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, various separation techniques, and optical biosensors to arrive at a firm, molecular-level understanding of the mutagenic and tumorigenic activity of carcinogens (whether endogenous or extrinsic) initiated by DNA adduct formation. The major goals of our research, which are related to the carcinogenic activity of metabolites formed from estrogens and/or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are: 1) development of monoclonal antibody-gold biosensor chips for detection and quantitation of biomarkers produced by covalent binding of catechol estrogen and PAH metabolites to DNA; 2) characterization and determination of DNA adducts formed from selected catechol estrogen quinones (CEQ) in urine of breast and prostrate cancer patients, and 3) development of microfluidic devices with amperometric detection. The catechol estrogens of particular interest are 4-hydroxyestrone and 4-hydroxyestradiol because they are potentially powerful endogenous carcinogens. CEQ derived DNA adducts have been already observed in urine of breast and prostate cancer patients (see refs below). It is anticipated that detection of the estrogen derived biomarkers could be used for early breast and prostate cancer risk assessment.

• Jankowiak, R., et al. “The Role of Fluorescence Line-Narrowing Spectroscopy and Related Luminescence-Based Techniques in the Elucidation of Mechanisms of Tumor Initiation by Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Estrogens” J. Phys. Chem. B, 2004, 108, 10266.

• Cavalieri, E., et al., “Catechol estrogen quinones as initiators of breast and other human cancers: Implications for biomarkers of susceptibility and cancer prevention”, BBA-Reviews on Cancer 2006, 1766: 63.

• Markushin, Y., et al., “Potential Biomarker for Early Risk Assessment of Prostate Cancer”, The Prostate, 2006, 66, 1565.

Selected Recent Publications:

  • Site-Energies of Active and Inactive Pheophytins in the Reaction Center of Photosystem II from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii K. Acharya, B. Neupane, R. Picorel, M. Seibert, and R. Jankowiak, J. Phys. Chem. B 2012, dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp3007624

  • Electron Transfer in the Rhodobacter Sphaeroides Reaction Center Containing Zn-Bacteriochlorophylls (Zn-RC) and its β-Zn-RC Mutant: Hole Burning Study, B. Neupane, P. Jaschke, T. Beatty, and R. Jankowiak, J. Phys. Chem. B 2012, 116, 3457-3466.

  • Effects of the Distributions of Energy Transfer Rates on Spectral Hole Burning in Pigment-Protein Complexes at Low Temperatures, N. Herascu, S. Ahmouda, R. Picorel, M. Seibert, R. Jankowiak and V. Zazubovich, J. Phys. Chem. B 2011, 115, 15098-15109.

  • Spectroscopic Study of CP43 Complex and PSI-CP43 Supercomplex of the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803, X. Feng, B. Neupane, K. Acharya, M. Rafael, V. Zazubovich, and R. Jankowiak, J. Phys. Chem. B 2011, 115, 13339-13349.

  • Low Temperature Frequency Domain Study of Excitation Energy Transfer in Ethynyl-linked Chlorophyll-trefoils and Aggregates, B. Neupane, N. C. Dang, R. F. Kelley, M. R. Wasielewski, and R. Jankowiak, J. Phys. Chem. B 2011, 115, 10391-10399.

  • Site Selective and Single Complex Laser-Based Spectroscopies: A Window on Excited State Electronic Structure, Excitation Energy Transfer, and Electron-Phonon Coupling of Selected Photosynthetic Complexes, Ryszard Jankowiak, Mike Reppert, Valter Zazubovich, Jörg Pieper, and Tõnu Reinot, Chem. Rev. 2011, 111, 4546-4598.

  • On stabilization of a neutral aromatic ligand by π–cation interactions in monoclonal antibodies, Chen Lin, Raja Chinnappan, Khem Acharya, Jean-Luc Pellequer, and Ryszard Jankowiak, Biophys. Chem.2011, 154, 35-40.

  • Integrated microfluidic device for the separation and electrochemical detection of catechol estrogen-derived DNA adducts, Abdulilah Dawoud Bani-Yaseen, Toshikazu Kawaguchi, Alexander K. Price, Christopher T. Culbertson and Ryszard Jankowiak, Anal. Bioanal. Chem., 2011, 399, 519.

  • On the Unusual Temperature Dependent Emission of the CP47 Antenna Protein Complex of Photosystem II, Khem Acharya, Bhanu Neupane, Mike Reppert, Ximao Feng, and Ryszard Jankowiak, J. Phys. Chem. Lett, 2010, 1, 2310.

  • Accurate Modeling of Fluorescence Line Narrowing Difference Spectra: Direct Measurement of the Single-Site Fluorescence Spectrum, Mike Reppert, V. Naibo, and Ryszard Jankowiak, J. Chem. Phys., 2010, 133, 014506.